World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Verandah

 

Verandah

"Verandah" redirects here. For the vine training system, see Verandah (vine system).

A veranda or verandah (from Portuguese varanda, IPA: [vɐˈɾɐ̃dɐ]) is a roofed opened gallery or porch.[1] The word commonly refers to balconies on cruise ships and some hotel properties. It is also described as an open pillared gallery, generally roofed, built around a central structure.[2] A veranda is often partly enclosed by a railing and frequently extends across the front and sides of the structure.[3]

History of term

The term dates to 1711 and came from the Hindi varanda, which in turn is thought to have come from a Portuguese word meaning "long balcony or terrace".[4]

Although the form "verandah" is correct and very common, some authorities prefer the version without an h (the Concise Oxford English Dictionary gives the h version as a variant,[5] and The Guardian Style Guide says "veranda not verandah").[6]

Architecture styles notable for verandas


The veranda has featured quite prominently in Australian vernacular architecture and first became widespread in colonial buildings during the 1850s. The Victorian Filigree architecture style is used by residential (particularly terraced houses in Australia and New Zealand) and commercial buildings (particularly hotels) across Australia and features decorative screens of wrought iron, cast iron "lace" or wood fretwork. The Queenslander is a style of residential construction in Queensland, Australia, which is adapted to subtropical climates and characterized by its large verandas, often in the Filigree style.

The Creole Townhouse in New Orleans, Louisiana is also noted for its prominent use of verandas.

Spanish colonial architecture (as well as the "Mission style" revivalist version that became popular in the Western United States in the early 1900s) commonly incorporates verandas, both on the exterior of buildings and, in cases of buildings with courtyards, along the interior walls of courtyards. In some cases, homes were constructed with every room opening into a courtyard veranda, rather than interior corridors or direct connections to other rooms.

See also

References

External links

  • Verandah
  • Archnet discussion forum on Verandah
  • British Empire Architecture
  • Ajay Sinha Discovers Experimentation in Ancient Indian Temple Design
  • The guide of verandah in France
  • See more verandahs in the State Library of Queensland's collection
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.