World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Vilmos Zsigmond

Vilmos Zsigmond, A.S.C.
Vilmos Zsigmond at 43rd KVIFF
Born (1930-06-16) June 16, 1930
Szeged, Hungary
Occupation Cinematographer
Years active 1955–present

Vilmos Zsigmond, A.S.C. (born June 16, 1930) is a Hungarian-American cinematographer.

In 2003, a survey conducted by the International Cinematographers Guild placed Zsigmond among the ten most influential cinematographers in history.[1]

Contents

  • Life and career 1
  • Awards and nominations 2
  • Filmography 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Life and career

Zsigmond was born in Szeged, Hungary, the son of Bozena (née Illichman), an administrator, and Vilmos Zsigmond, a celebrated soccer player and coach.[2][3] He studied cinema at the Academy of Drama and Film in Budapest.[4][5] He received an MA in cinematography.[2] He worked for five years in a Budapest feature film studio becoming "director of photography."[2] Together with his friend and fellow student László Kovács, he chronicled the events of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution in Budapest on thirty thousand feet of film[2] and then escaped to Austria shortly afterwards.[2] This early chapter of his professional life, with some of their footage of the revolution, constitutes the opening segment of the bio-documentary by PBS's Independent Lens (2009) called No Subtitles Necessary: Laszlo & Vilmos.

In 1962, he became a naturalized citizen of the United States.[3] He settled in Los Angeles and worked in photo labs as a technician and photographer. During the 1960s, he worked on many low-budget independent films and educational films, as he attempted to break into the film industry.[2] Some of the films that he worked on during this period credited him as "William Zsigmond," including the classic horror B-Film, The Incredibly Strange Creatures Who Stopped Living and Became Mixed-Up Zombies. The first film he worked on in the United States was The Sadist, starring Arch Hall, Jr.. In 1964 working with a favorite crew which included László Kovács, Jim Enochs, and Ernie Reed, Vilmos shot the European style, neo-noir, black and white film Summer Children (aka A Hot Summer Game) which has recently been fully restored digitally for DVD release.

He gained prominence during the 1970s after being hired by The Witches Of Eastwick and with Woody Allen on Melinda and Melinda, Cassandra's Dream, and You Will Meet a Tall Dark Stranger.

He has been a longtime user and endorser of Tiffen filters, and is also associated with the technique known as 'flashing' or 'pre-fogging'. This involves carefully exposing the film negative to a small, controlled amount of light in order to create a muted colour palette, pioneered by cinematographer Freddie Young on the 1966 film The Deadly Affair.

In 2012, Zsigmond along with Yuri Neyman, ASC co-founded Global Cinematography Institute in Los Angeles, CA with the mission to educate cinematographers, and to preserve and extend the role of cinematographer as the major expert and contributor in the image building process in all current and future variations of the complex mix of artistry and technology.[6]

Awards and nominations

Filmography

See also

References

  1. ^ "Top 10 Most Influential Cinematographers Voted on by Camera Guild," October 16, 2003. Retrieved January 28, 2011.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g Schaefer, Dennis; Larry Salvato (1986). "Vilmos Zsigmond". Masters of Light: Conversations with Contemporary Cinematographers.  
  3. ^ a b Vilmos Zsigmond Biography (1930-)
  4. ^ "Vilmos Zsigmond".  
  5. ^ "Vilmos Zsigmond".  
  6. ^ http://library.creativecow.net/kaufman_debra/Global-Cinematography-Institute/1

External links

  • Vilmos Zsigmond at the Internet Movie Database
  • Internet Encyclopedia of Cinematographers profile
  • Budapest Cinematographers MasterClass's Master
  • Sulinet-Panteon (Hungarian)
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.