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Vulnerability

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Vulnerability

Vulnerability refers to the inability to withstand the effects of a hostile environment. A window of vulnerability (WoV) is a time frame within which defensive measures are reduced, compromised or lacking

Contents

  • Common applications 1
  • Research 2
  • Types 3
    • Social 3.1
    • Cognitive 3.2
    • Military 3.3
  • Invulnerability 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Common applications

In relation to hazards and disasters, vulnerability is a concept that links the relationship that people have with their environment to social forces and institutions and the cultural values that sustain and contest them. “The concept of vulnerability expresses the multi-dimensionality of disasters by focusing attention on the totality of relationships in a given social situation which constitute a condition that, in combination with environmental forces, produces a disaster”.[1]

It's also the extent to which changes could harm a system, or to which the community can be affected by the impact of a hazard or exposed to the possibility of being attacked or harmed, either physically or emotionally: "we were in a vulnerable position".

Research

Within the body of literature related to vulnerability, major research streams include questions of Millennium Development Goals. Many institutions are conducting interdisciplinary research on vulnerability. A forum that brings many of the current researchers on vulnerability together is the Expert Working Group (EWG).1 Researchers are currently working to refine definitions of “vulnerability”, measurement and assessment methods, and effective communication of research to decision makers.[3]

Types

Social

In its sense, social vulnerability is one dimension of vulnerability to multiple

  • BUGTRAQ-VULNERABLE SITE TRACKER (vulnerability kinds)
  • Community based vulnerability mapping in Búzi, Mozambique (GIS and Remote Sensing)
  • MunichRe Foundation
  • Satellite Vulnerability
  • Security-Feeds.com (Keep an eye on major feeds concerning security alerts and vulnerabilities on a single page)
  • Survivability/Lethality Analysis - US Army
  • RESIST RESIST Vulnerability Assessment Code
  • Top Computer Vulnerabilities
  • United Nations University Institute of Environment and Human Security
  • VULNERABILITY LABORATORY (Verified Vulnerability Research Project)

External links

  1. ^ Bankoff, Greg etal. (2004). Mapping Vulnerability: Disasters, Development and People. London: Earth scan. 
  2. ^ Villagran, Juan Carlos. "“Vulnerability: A conceptual and methodological review." SOURCE. No. 2/2006. Bonn, Germany.
  3. ^ Birkmann, Joern (editor). 2006. Measuring Vulnerability to Natural Hazards – Towards Disaster Resilient Societies. UNU Press.
  4. ^ Luis Flores Ballesteros. "What determines a disaster?" 54 Pesos May. 2008:54 Pesos 11 Sep 2008. http://54pesos.org/2008/09/11/what-determines-a-disaster/
  5. ^ See also Daniel R. Curtis, 'Pre-industrial societies and strategies for the exploitation of resources. A theoretical framework for understanding why some settlements are resilient and some settlements are vulnerable to crisis', http://www.academia.edu/1932627/Pre-industrial_societies_and_strategies_for_the_exploitation_of_resources._A_theoretical_framework_for_understanding_why_some_settlements_are_resilient_and_some_settlements_are_vulnerable_to_crisis
  6. ^ a b Riskind, John H.; Black, David (2005). "Cognitive Vulnerability". In Freeman, Arthur, Felgoise, Stephanie H., et al. Encyclopedia of Cognitive Behavior Therapy. New York: Springer. pp. 122–26.  
  7. ^ Ingram, Rick (February 2003). "Origins of Cognitive Vulnerability to Depression". Cognitive Therapy and Research 27 (1): 77–88.  
  8. ^ Mathews, Andrew; MacLeod, Colin (1 April 2005). "Cognitive Vulnerability to Emotional Disorders". Annual Review of Clinical Psychology 1 (1): 167–195.  
  9. ^ Ball, Robert (2003). The Fundamentals of Aircraft Combat Survivability Analysis and Design, 2nd Edition. AIAA Education Series. p. 603.  
  10. ^ Warship Vulnerability
  11. ^ William Godwin (1876). "Lives of the Necromancers". p. 17. 

References

See also

In mythology talismans charms and amulets were created by magic users for the purpose of making the wearer immune to injury from both mystic and mundane weapons. [11]

Invulnerability is a common feature found in video games. It makes the player impervious to pain, damage or loss of health. It can be found in the form of "power-ups" or cheats;when activated via cheats, it is often referred to as "god mode". Generally, it does not protect the player from certain instant-death hazards, most notably "bottomless" pits from which, even if the player were to survive the fall, they would be unable to escape. As a rule, invulnerability granted by power-ups is temporary, and wears off after a set amount of time, while invulnerability cheats, once activated, remain in effect until deactivated, or the end of the level is reached. Depending on the game in question, invulnerability to damage may or may not protect the player from non-damage effects, such as being immobilized or sent flying. In comic books, some superheroes are considered invulnerable, though this usually only applies up to a certain level. (e.g. Superman is invulnerable to physical attacks from normal people but not to the extremely powerful attacks of Doomsday)..

Invulnerability

In military terminology, vulnerability is a subset of survivability, the others being susceptibility and recoverability. Vulnerability is defined in various ways depending on the nation and service arm concerned, but in general it refers to the near-instantaneous effects of a weapon attack. In aviation it is defined as the inability of an aircraft to withstand the damage caused by the man-made hostile environment.[9] In some definitions, recoverability (damage control, firefighting, restoration of capability) is included in vulnerability. Some military services develop their own concept of vulnerability.[10]

Military

A cognitive vulnerability, in cognitive psychology, is an erroneous belief, cognitive bias, or pattern of thought that is believed to predispose the individual to psychological problems.[6] It is in place before the symptoms of psychological disorders start to appear; after the individual encounters a stressful experience, the cognitive vulnerability shapes a maladaptive response that may lead to a psychological disorder.[6] In psychopathology, cognitive vulnerability is constructed from schema models, hopelessness models, and attachment theory.[7] Attentional bias is one mechanism leading to faulty cognitive bias that leads to cognitive vulnerability. Allocating a danger level to a threat depends on the urgency or intensity of the threshold. Anxiety is not associated with selective orientation.[8]

Cognitive

[5][4]

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