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Waldrada of Worms

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Title: Waldrada of Worms  
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Subject: 801, Otto II, Holy Roman Emperor, Hugh Capet, Rudolph I of Burgundy, Bertha of Burgundy, Conrad II, Duke of Transjurane Burgundy, Matilda, Abbess of Quedlinburg
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Waldrada of Worms

Waldrada of Worms (aka, Waldraith of Toulouse (born 801, date of death unknown) was the second wife of Conrad II, Duke of Transjurane Burgundy. They had two known children, Adelaide of Auxerre and Rudolph I of Burgundy.
She was first married to Robert III of Worms, in 819 in Wormgau, Germany. This marriage brought in 820 a son, Robert IV the Strong. The marriage ended when Robert III died in 822.

Some say her father was Saint William of Gellone. However, this may be unlikely. It is also unlikely that she is the wife of Conrad. While having been born supposedly between 790 and 801, she certainly could have been William's daughter, these dates are likely not accurate if she was also Conrad's wife. This is because her progeny with Conrad were born ca. 849 and 859, respectively. If these dates are accurate, then Waldrada had these children between the ages of 49 and 59 years old, at best. Given that menopause occurs in modern times between ages 45–55, it is possible that she was Adelaide's mother. Her being Rudolph's mother is more problematic.

What is more likely is that she and the wife of Conrad are two different people. One possible solution is that the Waldrada who married Conrad II and Robert III is the daughter of Waldrada, wife of Adrian, Count of Orléans (767-824), who may (key word) be the daughter of William of Gelone. This is all conjecture, however.

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