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War hawk

Origins of
the War of 1812
ChesapeakeLeopard Affair
Orders in Council (1807)
Embargo Act of 1807
Non-Intercourse Act (1809)
Macon's Bill Number 2
Tecumseh's War
Henry letters
War Hawks
Rule of 1756
Monroe–Pinkney Treaty
Little Belt Affair

A war hawk, or simply hawk, is a term used in politics for someone favoring war in a debate over whether to go to war, or whether to continue or escalate an existing war. War hawks are the opposite of doves. The terms are derived by analogy with the birds of the same name: hawks are predators that attack and eat other animals, whereas doves mostly eat seeds and fruit and are historically a symbol of peace.

Contents

  • Historical group 1
  • Variations of the term 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Historical group

Henry Clay, one of the most significant members of the War Hawks.[1]

The term "War Hawk" was coined by the prominent

  1. ^ a b c Eaton, Clement (1957). Henry Clay and the Art of American Politics. Boston, MA: Little, Brown and Company. p. 25. 
  2. ^ Donald Hickey, The War of 1812: A Forgotten Conflict (Urbana, Illinois: University of Illinois Press, 1989), p. 334n.8.
  3. ^ Daniel M. Smith, The American Diplomatic Experience (Boston, 1972) p.60
  4. ^ Stagg, J.C.A. (1976), "James Madison and the "Malcontents": The Political Origins of the War of 1812", The William and Mary Quarterly 33 (4): 557–585,  

References

See also

The term liberal hawk is a derivation of the traditional phrase, in the sense that it denotes an individual with "socially liberal" inclinations coupled with an aggressive outlook on foreign policy.

The term also created the term "chicken hawk", referring to a war hawk who avoided military service.

In modern American usage "hawk" means a fierce advocate for a cause or policy, such as "deficit hawk" or "privacy hawk".

Variations of the term

[4] The notion that this loose faction of congressional War Hawks pressured

[1]

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