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Watertown, South Dakota

Watertown, South Dakota
City
Intersection of Interstate 29 and Highway 212: The Redlin Art Center
Intersection of Interstate 29 and Highway 212: The Redlin Art Center
Nickname(s): South Dakota's Rising Star
Location in Codington County and the state of South Dakota
Location in Codington County and the state of South Dakota
Coordinates:
Country United States
State South Dakota
County Codington
Founded 1879[1]
Incorporated 1885[2]
Government
 • Mayor Steve Thorson
Area[3]
 • City 25.04 sq mi (64.85 km2)
 • Land 17.45 sq mi (45.20 km2)
 • Water 7.59 sq mi (19.66 km2)
Elevation 1,732 ft (528 m)
Population (2010)[4]
 • City 21,482
 • Estimate (2013[5]) 21,995
 • Density 1,231.1/sq mi (475.3/km2)
 • Metro 27,606 (US: 447th)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 57201
Area code(s) 605
FIPS code 46-69300
GNIS feature ID 1258841[6]
Website http://www.watertownsd.us/

Watertown is a city in and the county seat of Codington County, South Dakota, United States.[7] The population was 21,482 at the 2010 census. It is the fifth largest city in South Dakota. It is also the principal city of the Watertown Micropolitan Statistical Area, which includes all of Codington and Hamlin counties.

Watertown is home to the Redlin Art Center which houses many of the original art works produced by Terry Redlin, one of America's most popular wildlife artists. Watertown also is home to the Bramble Park Zoo and the Watertown Regional Library. The Watertown Public Opinion is a six-day daily newspaper published in Watertown.

Watertown's residential real estate is considered the most expensive in South Dakota for cities of its size; the median price for a home in Watertown is around $200,000.[8]

Contents

  • Geography 1
  • History 2
  • Demographics 3
    • 2010 census 3.1
    • 2000 census 3.2
  • Education 4
  • Points of interest 5
  • Local media 6
    • AM radio 6.1
    • FM radio 6.2
  • Transportation 7
  • Notable people 8
  • Notable visitors 9
  • Major employers 10
  • References 11
    • Bibliography 11.1
  • External links 12

Geography

Watertown is located at (44.903433, -97.120437),[9] along the Big Sioux River.[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 25.04 square miles (64.85 km2), of which, 17.45 square miles (45.20 km2) is land and 7.59 square miles (19.66 km2) is water.[3] Watertown sits on the Big Sioux River and two major lakes, Lake Pelican and Lake Kampeska. Most of Watertown also sits upon a short plateau. Elevation at Watertown Regional Airport is 1,745 feet.

Watertown has been assigned the ZIP code 57201 and the FIPS place code 69300.

History

An 1883 bird's eye illustration of Watertown

Watertown was founded in 1879 as a rail terminus when the Chicago & Northwestern Railroad reactivated part of a line it had constructed to Lake Kampeska.[1][11] Despite the prominence of rivers and lakes in the area, the city was named after Watertown, New York, the hometown of brothers John E. Kemp and Oscar P. Kemp, two of the city's founders. The town's name was originally planned to be named Kampeska. [1]

During the 1880s, Watertown prospered as a transportation hub after the railroads had been extended further west. Along with several other cities, Watertown had been a candidate as capital of the new state of South Dakota,[1] although it lost out to the more centrally located Pierre. The city's current newspaper, the Watertown Public Opinion, began publishing in 1887.[1]

In the mid-20th century, Interstate 29 was constructed through eastern South Dakota.[12] The route included a slight bend to bring the interstate closer to Watertown.[12] The interstate's construction has been a major economic benefit to the larger communities along its route, including Watertown.[12]

Demographics

The per capita income for the city was $18,994. About 5.7% of families and 9.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.5% of those under age 18 and 11.0% of those age 65 or over.[16]

2010 census

As of the census[4] of 2010, there were 21,482 people, 9,278 households, and 5,563 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,231.1 inhabitants per square mile (475.3/km2). There were 10,050 housing units at an average density of 575.9 per square mile (222.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.8% White, 0.4% African American, 2.4% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.4% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.6% of the population.

There were 9,278 households of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.7% were married couples living together, 10.0% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.3% had a male householder with no wife present, and 40.0% were non-families. 33.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.90.

The median age in the city was 36.6 years. 24.2% of residents were under the age of 18; 10.3% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24.9% were from 25 to 44; 25.2% were from 45 to 64; and 15.4% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.2% male and 50.8% female.

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 20,237 people, 8,385 households, and 5,290 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,328.9 people per square mile (513.0/km²). There were 9,193 housing units at an average density of 603.7 per square mile (233.1/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 96.25% White, 0.14% African American, 1.65% Native American, 0.33% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.71% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.28% of the population. 47.1% were of German, 19.8% Norwegian and 5.9% Irish ancestry. 96.5% spoke English, 1.7% Spanish and 1.1% German as their first language.

There were 8,385 households out of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.6% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.9% were non-families. 30.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the city the population was spread out with 25.9% under the age of 18, 11.3% from 18 to 24, 27.9% from 25 to 44, 19.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 96.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.9 males.

Education

Watertown has two institutions providing post-secondary education. Lake Area Technical Institute is a public technical school classified as a community college, offering degrees in areas such as Agriculture, Nursing, and Welding. There is also a satellite campus of Mount Marty College,[17] a private Catholic school based in Yankton, South Dakota.

Watertown has one public high school, Watertown High School, and one private boarding school, Great Plains Lutheran High School. Watertown is considered one of the best cities for secondary education within the state and is considered above-average for post-secondary education within the state.

Watertown Middle School is the only public middle school in Watertown. The Watertown School Board is currently in the process of building the new middle school a few blocks north of the current middle school. The new school, currently in construction, is said to be completed in late 2016, including a new recreation center located next to it.

There are multiple elementary schools in Watertown. The five public elementary schools include: Lincoln Elementary, Jefferson Elementary, Roosevelt Elementary, McKinnely Elementary, and Mellette Elementary. Immaculate Conception School is a private Catholic elementary school. St. Martin's Lutheran School is a private Lutheran elementary school. Watertown Christian School is a private non-denominational Christian elementary school.

Points of interest

Sailboat on Lake Kampeska circa 1900.

Local media

AM radio

AM radio stations
Frequency Call sign Name Format Owner City
950 AM KWAT News/Talk Three Eagles Communications Watertown
1480 AM KSDR 1480 Talk Radio News/Talk Three Eagles Communications Watertown

FM radio

FM radio stations
Frequency Call sign Name Format Owner Target city/market City of license
89.1 FM KPGT Religious Church Planters of America Watertown Watertown
90.1 FM K211EC Christian
WJFM-FM translator
Jimmy Swaggart Ministries Watertown Watertown
91.9 FM K220IT The Refuge Contemporary Christian Refuge Media Group Watertown Watertown
92.9 FM KSDR-FM KS93 Country Three Eagles Communications Watertown Watertown
96.1 FM KIXX Kicks 96 Hot AC Three Eagles Communications Watertown Watertown
96.9 FM KDLO-FM Big Country 96.9 Country Three Eagles Communications Watertown Watertown
99.1 FM KXLG Classic Hits/News/Talk Dakota Communications Watertown Milbank
104.3 FM KKSD Hippie Radio Classic Hits Three Eagles Communications Watertown Milbank
106.3 FM KPHR Power 106.3 Classic Rock Armada Media Watertown Ortonville

Transportation

The City of Watertown is connected to three major thoroughfares: Highway 81, running north and south; Highway 212, running east and west; and Interstate 29, running north and south.

Watertown also has one airport, Watertown Regional Airport, served by Great Lakes Aviation, and local bus service provided by the Watertown Area Transit Corporation.

Notable people

Notable visitors

President Barack Obama has visited the city twice, first in 2008 during his presidential campaign, and again on May 8th, 2015, to address the graduating class of 2015 from Lake Area Technical Institute.

Major employers

International Manufacturers with at least 50 Employees[18]

  • ESCO Manufacturing, Inc.
  • Benchmark Foam, Inc.
  • Sparton, Inc.
  • Worthington Industries
  • Persona, Inc.
  • Smith Equipment Manufacturing Company
  • Terex Utilities
  • Tower Systems Inc.
  • Twin City Die Castings
  • Wurth Electronics Midcom

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Hasselstrom, p. 29.
  2. ^ "SD Towns" (PDF).  
  3. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010".  
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder".  
  5. ^ "Population Estimates".  
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names".  
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  8. ^ "South Dakota Homes For Sale By City". South Dakota Real Estate Trends. RealEstate.com. Retrieved 28 January 2013. 
  9. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990".  
  10. ^ DeLorme (2001). South Dakota Atlas & Gazetteer. Yarmouth, Maine: DeLorme. ISBN 0-89933-330-3
  11. ^ Thompson (ed.), p. 173.
  12. ^ a b c Schell, p. 333.
  13. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2014". Retrieved June 4, 2015. 
  14. ^  
  15. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013". Retrieved July 7, 2014. 
  16. ^ Watertown, South Dakota: Now. Watertown Area Chamber of Commerce and Convention and Visitors Bureau, 2006
  17. ^ "Watertown Campus". Retrieved 18 February 2011. 
  18. ^ Watertown Chamber of Commerce. "Watertown Chamber of Commerce". Retrieved 2008-03-03. 

Bibliography

  • Hasselstrom, Linda M. (1994). Roadside History of South Dakota. Missoula, MT:  
  • Schell, Herbert S. (2004). History of South Dakota. Pierre, SD:  
  • Thompson, Harry F. (ed.) (2009). A New South Dakota History (Second ed.). Sioux Falls, SD: Center for Western Studies -  

External links

  • Watertown Government Website
  • Watertown Area Chamber of Commerce
  • Watertown Public Opinion - local newspaper
  • Watertown Regional Library Website
  • School District Website
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