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Wildlife photography

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Title: Wildlife photography  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Mayakkam Enna, Wildlife Photographer of the Year, Bhushan Mate, John Pezzenti, Canon EF 500mm lens
Collection: Nature Photography
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Wildlife photography

Wildlife photography is a genre of photography concerned with documenting various forms of wildlife in their natural habitat. It is one of the more challenging forms of photography. As well as requiring sound technical skills, such as being able to expose correctly, wildlife photographers generally need good field craft skills. For example, some animals are difficult to approach and thus a knowledge of the animal's behavior is needed in order to be able to predict its actions. Photographing some species may require stalking skills or the use of a hide/blind for concealment.

While wildlife photographs can be taken using basic equipment, successful photography of some types of wildlife requires specialist equipment, such as macro lenses for insects, long focal length lenses for birds and underwater cameras for marine life. However, a great wildlife photograph can also be the result of being in the right place at the right time.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Definition 2
  • Examples 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

History

In the early days of photography, it was difficult to get a photograph of wildlife due to

  1. ^ http://www.answers.com/topic/wildlife-photography
  2. ^ http://photography.nationalgeographic.com/photography/photographers/first-wildlife-photos.html
  3. ^ http://photography.nationalgeographic.com/photography/photographers/digital-camera-trap-article.html
  4. ^ http://rps.org/news/2014/may/nature-definition-agreed Accessed 25 May 2014

References

See also

Examples

The world's three largest photography organisations, the [4]

Definition

[3]

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