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William Benton (senator)

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Title: William Benton (senator)  
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Subject: United States Senate election in Connecticut, 1952, Encyclopædia Britannica, History of the Encyclopædia Britannica, Raymond E. Baldwin, Prescott Bush
Collection: 1900 Births, 1973 Deaths, 20Th-Century American Businesspeople, 20Th-Century American Episcopalians, 20Th-Century American Writers, American Episcopalians, American Publishers (People), Appointed United States Senators, Connecticut Democrats, Democratic Party United States Senators, Encyclopædia Britannica, McCarthyism, People from Minneapolis, Minnesota, People from New York City, Permanent Delegates of the United States to Unesco, Politicians from Norwalk, Connecticut, The Yale Record Alumni, United States Senators from Connecticut, University of Chicago People, Yale University Alumni
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William Benton (senator)

William Burnett Benton
United States Senator
from Connecticut
In office
December 17, 1949 – January 3, 1953
Preceded by Raymond E. Baldwin
Succeeded by William A. Purtell
Personal details
Born (1900-04-01)April 1, 1900
Minneapolis, Minnesota, U.S.
Died March 18, 1973(1973-03-18) (aged 72)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Helen Hemingway Benton
Alma mater Carleton College
Yale University
Religion Episcopalian
William Benton (C) with Hubert Humphrey and Golda Meir, Jerusalem 1970

William Burnett Benton (April 1, 1900 – March 18, 1973) was a U.S. senator from Connecticut (1949–1953) and publisher of the Encyclopædia Britannica (1943–1973).

Contents

  • Early life 1
  • Advertising and civic life 2
  • Public and elected office life 3
  • Encyclopædia Britannica and further civic life 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Early life

Benton was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He was educated at Shattuck Military Academy, Faribault, Minnesota, and Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota until 1918, at which point he matriculated at Yale University, where he contributed to campus humor magazine The Yale Record[1] and was admitted to the Zeta Psi fraternity.

Advertising and civic life

He graduated in 1921 and began work for advertising agencies in New York City and Chicago until 1929, after which he co-founded Benton & Bowles with Chester Bowles in New York. He moved to Norwalk, Connecticut in 1932, and served as the part-time vice president of the University of Chicago from 1937 to 1945. In 1944, he had entered into unsuccessful negotiations with Walt Disney to make six to twelve educational films annually.[2]

Public and elected office life

He was appointed United Nations. He was appointed to the United States Senate on 17 December 1949 by his old partner Chester Bowles (who had been elected Governor in 1948), and subsequently elected in the general election on 7 November 1950 as a Democrat to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Raymond E. Baldwin in December 1949 for the remainder of the term ending 3 January 1953.

In the November 1950 election, he defeated Joseph McCarthy from the Senate. On television, when asked if he would take any action against Benton's reelection bid, McCarthy replied, "I think it will be unnecessary. Little Willie Benton, Connecticut's mental midget keeps on... it will be unnecessary for me or anyone else to do any campaigning against him. He's doing his campaigning against himself." Benton lost in the general election for the full term in 1952 to William A. Purtell. Benton's comeback bid failed in 1958 when, running against Bowles and Thomas Dodd he failed to win the Democratic nomination for the U.S. Senate.[3] He was later appointed United States Ambassador to UNESCO in Paris and served from 1963 to 1968.

Encyclopædia Britannica and further civic life

For much of his life, from 1943 to his death in 1973, he was chairman of the board and publisher of the Encyclopædia Britannica, was a member of and delegate to numerous United Nations and international conferences and commissions, and trustee of several schools and colleges.

Benton established the Benton Foundation.

He died in New York City on March 18, 1973, aged 72, and was survived by his widow, Helen Hemingway Benton, who died in 1974.

See also

  • Muzak, a company once owned by Benton

References

  1. ^ Bronson, Francis W., Thomas Caldecott Chubb, and Cyril Hume, eds. (1922) The Yale Record Book of Verse: 1872-1922. New Haven: Yale University Press. p. 100-101.
  2. ^ Gabler, Neal, Walt Disney: the triumph of the American imagination, New York : Random House, 2006. ISBN 978-0-679-43822-9. Cf. p.444
  3. ^ "Benton, Bowles Lose to Dodd in Connecticut". June 29, 1958. 
  • Hyman, Sidney (1970). The Lives of William Benton. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.  

External links

  • William Benton's Congressional Biography
  • A film clip "Longines Chronoscope with Sen. William Benton (June 6, 1952)" is available for free download at the Internet Archive
Government offices
Preceded by
Archibald MacLeish
Assistant Secretary of State for Public Affairs
September 17, 1945 – September 30, 1947
Succeeded by
George V. Allen
United States Senate
Preceded by
Raymond E. Baldwin
U.S. Senator (Class 1) from Connecticut
1949–1953
Served alongside: Brien McMahon, William A. Purtell, Prescott Bush
Succeeded by
William A. Purtell
Party political offices
Preceded by
Joseph M. Tone
Democratic Party nominee for United States Senator from Connecticut
(Class 1)

1950, 1952
Succeeded by
Thomas J. Dodd
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