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William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire

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William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire

William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire

William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire, KGPC (26 September 1698 – 5 December 1755) was a British nobleman and Whig politician, the son of William Cavendish, 2nd Duke of Devonshire and the Hon. Rachel Russell.

He married Catherine Hoskins (or Hoskyn) (d. 8 May 1777) on 27 March 1718. They had seven children:

Like his father, the 3rd Duke was active in politics, and served for seven years as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He was also a Member of Parliament from 1721 until his father's death sent him to the House of Lords in 1729.[2]

He was made a Privy Counsellor (PC) in 1731, and served as Lord Privy Seal from 1731 to 1733. He was invested as a Knight of the Garter (KG) in 1733.

In 1739, he was enlisted as a founding governor for the new children's charity, the Foundling Hospital, in Bloomsbury, London, which aimed to alleviate the problem of babies being abandoned by destitute mothers and ended up becoming a centre for British art and music. William Cavendish sold the Old Devonshire House at 48 Boswell Street, Theobald's Road in Bloomsbury. In 1734 Cavendish engaged architect William Kent to build a new Cavendish House in fashionable Picadilly.

During the Jacobite rising of 1745 the Duke raised a militia in support of the King, known as the Derbyshire Blues, which mustered at The George Inn, Derby, on 3 December 1745.

William Cavendish is also notable as the most recent common ancestor of Prince Charles and his first wife, Lady Diana Spencer. Charles and Diana were seventh cousins once removed as Charles descends from William's son, the 4th Duke, and Diana was descended from William's daughter, Lady Elizabeth.[3]

References

  1. ^ Rachel Walpole, Countess of Orford at Geni.com
  2. ^ "William Cavendish, 3rd Duke of Devonshire (1698 - 1755)". Chatsworth House. 27 March 2015. Retrieved 27 March 2015. 
  3. ^ http://www.dianapow.com/faq.html#faq31

External links

  • thePeerage.com
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Galfridus Walpole
John Newsham
Member of Parliament for Lostwithiel
1721–1724
With: John Newsham 1721–1722
Lord Stanhope 1722–1724
Succeeded by
Sir Orlando Bridgeman, Bt
Henry Parsons
Preceded by
Hon. John West
Richard West
Member of Parliament for Grampound
17221727
With: Humphry Morice
Succeeded by
Humphry Morice
Philip Hawkins
Preceded by
John Bigg
John Proby
Member of Parliament for Huntingdonshire
1727–1729
With: John Bigg
Succeeded by
John Bigg
Robert Piggott
Honorary titles
Preceded by
The Duke of St Albans
Captain of the Gentlemen Pensioners
1726–1731
Succeeded by
The Earl of Burlington
Preceded by
The 2nd Duke of Devonshire
Lord Lieutenant of Derbyshire
1729–1755
Succeeded by
The 4th Duke of Devonshire
Political offices
Preceded by
In Commission
Lord Privy Seal
1731–1733
Succeeded by
The Viscount Lonsdale
Preceded by
The Earl of Chesterfield
Lord Steward
1733–1737
Succeeded by
The Duke of Dorset
Preceded by
The Duke of Dorset
Lord Lieutenant of Ireland
1737–1744
Succeeded by
The Earl of Chesterfield
Preceded by
The Duke of Dorset
Lord Steward
1744–1749
Succeeded by
The Duke of Marlborough
Peerage of England
Preceded by
William Cavendish
Duke of Devonshire
1729–1755
Succeeded by
William Cavendish
Baron Cavendish of Hardwick
(descended by acceleration)

1729–1751

Catergory:People from Derbyshire


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