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Winger (ice hockey)

Winger, in the game of ice hockey, is a forward position of a player whose primary zone of play on the ice is along the outer playing area. They typically work by flanking the centre (ice hockey) forward. Originally the name was given to forward players who went up and down the sides of the rink. Nowadays, there are different types of wingers in the game — out-and-out goal scorers, checkers who disrupt the opponents, and forwards who work along the boards and in the corners. They tend to be bigger than centreman and smaller than defenceman.

This position is commonly referred to by the side of the rink that the winger normally takes, i.e. "left wing" or "right wing."

Contents

  • Defensive zone play 1
  • Backchecking 2
  • Face-offs 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5

Defensive zone play

Typical winger positioning in the defensive zone.

The wingers' responsibilities in the defensive zone include the following:

  • wait for a pass from their teammates
  • intercept a pass to the opposing defenceman
  • attack the opposing defencemen when they have the puck

Wingers should typically not:

  • play deep in their zone
  • help out their teammates along the boards

Wingers should be playing high in the zone, and always be vigilant for a breakout pass or a chance to chip the puck offside. When wingers receive a pass along the boards, they can exercise a number of options:

  • Bank the puck off the boards or glass to get it out of the zone
  • Redirect or softly pass the puck to a rushing forward
  • Shoot the puck out to the centre line to another forward who can either set up an attack, or dump the puck into the offensive zone to summon a line change
  • Carry the puck themselves to attempt a breakaway or an odd man rush

Backchecking

Wingers are usually the last players to backcheck out of the offensive zone. On the backcheck, it is essential that they cover the last free opposing player rushing in. Once the puck is controlled by the opposing team in the defensive zone, however, wingers are responsible for covering the defenceman on their side of the ice.

Face-offs

Prior to the puck being dropped for a face-off, players other than those taking the face-off must not make any physical contact with players on the opposite team, nor enter the face-off circle (where marked). After the puck is dropped, it is essential for wingers to engage the opposing players to prevent them from obtaining possession of the puck.

Once a team has established control of the puck, wingers can set themselves up into an appropriate position.

Some wingers are also employed to handle faceoffs.[1]

See also

Positions on the hockey rink
Forwards:
Left wing | Centre | Right wing
Defencemen:
Left defenceman | Right defenceman
Goaltender:
Goaltender
Power forward | Enforcer | Grinder | Pest | Two-way forward | Captain | Head coach | Referee & linesman

References

  1. ^ Heika: Faceoff skills learned playing center paying dividends for Stars' Jamie Benn in new position
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