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Ziegfeld Theatre

The Ziegfeld Theatre is an American single-screen movie theater located at 141 West 54th Street in the Manhattan borough of New York City, New York.

It was opened in 1969. The theater was named in honor of the original Ziegfeld Theatre which was built by the impresario Florenz Ziegfeld, Jr. and operated from 1927 until it was demolished in 1966.

History

On December 17, 1969, a few hundred feet from the site of the original Ziegfeld Theatre, a new Ziegfeld Theatre opened as a single-screen movie house. Located at 141 West 54th Street, it is one of the last large-scale movie palaces built in the United States.

Constructed by Emery Roth & Sons from designs by Irving Gershon and red-carpeted interior designs by John J. McNamara, it has 1,131 seats (825 seats in the orchestral section and 306 seats in the tiered rear section). It has been used for 70 mm world premieres and big-event press screenings, such as the November 1977 opening of Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

The theater underwent extensive renovations in the late 1990s. It was a centerpiece site during the 2008 New York Film Festival because of reconstruction work at Lincoln Center that year. During the 2000s, digital projection was installed.

The theater is the largest single-screen cinema operating in New York and continues to be the site of film premieres and gala events.

Management and ownership

Since 2013, the Ziegfeld has been managed by Bow Tie Cinemas, on behalf of Cablevision, which owns the theater (the theater was previously part of the Clearview Cinemas theater chain prior to the chain's sale to Bow Tie; the actual ownership of the Ziegfeld building was excluded from the sale).

See also

External links

  • Cinema Treasures
  • Official website
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