World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Zimri (king)

Article Id: WHEBN0016362368
Reproduction Date:

Title: Zimri (king)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Omri, Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), Jeroboam II, Jeroboam, Jehu
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Zimri (king)

Zimri or Zambri (Hebrew: זִמְרִי, Zimrī ; praiseworthy; Latin: Zambri) was a king of Israel for seven days. William F. Albright has dated his reign to 876 BCE, while E. R. Thiele offers the date 885 BCE.[1] His story is told in 1 Kings, Chapter 16.

In the Bible

He was the chariot commander who murdered king Elah and all his family members at Tirzah, as Elah was drinking in the house of Arza, his steward.[2] Zimri succeeded Elah as king. However, Zimri reigned only seven days, because the army elected Omri as king, and with their support laid siege to Tirzah. Finding his position untenable, Zimri set fire to the palace and perished.

Omri became king only after four years of war with Tibni, another claimant to the throne of Israel.

Depiction of the coronation of Zimri, from Rudolf von Ems' Chronicle of the World.

The name Zimri became a byword for a traitor who murdered his master. When the Duke of Buckingham.

References

  1. ^ Edwin Thiele, The Mysterious Numbers of the Hebrew Kings, (1st ed.; New York: Macmillan, 1951; 2d ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1965; 3rd ed.; Grand Rapids: Zondervan/Kregel, 1983). ISBN 0-8254-3825-X, 9780825438257
  2. ^ , Fessenden and Company, 1836The Comprehensive Commentary on the Holy Bible: Ruth-Psalm LXIIIScott, Thomas and Henry, Matthew.
Zimri (king)
Contemporary King of Judah: Asa
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Elah
King of Israel
885 BCE
Succeeded by
Omri
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.