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The Maine Woods

By Thoreau, Henry David

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Book Id: WPLBN0000700367
Format Type: PDF eBook
File Size: 811.77 KB.
Reproduction Date: 2005

Title: The Maine Woods  
Author: Thoreau, Henry David
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Literature, Literature & thought, Literature & drama
Collections: DjVu Editions Classic Literature
Historic
Publication Date:
Publisher: DjVu Editions Classic Literature

Citation

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Thoreau, H. D. (n.d.). The Maine Woods. Retrieved from http://www.self.gutenberg.org/


Excerpt
Excerpt: ON THE 31st of August, 1846, I left Concord in Massachusetts for Bangor and the backwoods of Maine, by way of the railroad and steamboat, intending to accompany a relative of mine engaged in the lumber-trade in Bangor, as far as a dam on the west branch of the Penobscot, in which property he was interested. From this place, which is about one hundred miles by the river above Bangor, thirty miles from the Houlton military road, and five miles beyond the last log-hut, I proposed to make excursions to Mount Ktaadn, the second highest mountain in New England, about thirty miles distant, and to some of the lakes of the Penobscot, either alone or with such company as I might pick up there. It is unusual to find a camp so far in the woods at that season, when lumbering operations have ceased, and I was glad to avail myself of the circumstance of a gang of men being employed there at that time in repairing the injuries caused by the great freshet in the spring. The mountain may be approached more easily and directly on horseback and on foot from the northeast side, by the Aroostook road, and the Wassataquoik River; but in that case you see much less of the wilderness, none of the glorious river and lake scenery, and have no experience of the batteau and the boatman?s life. I was fortunate also in the season of the year, for in the summer myriads of black flies, mosquitoes, and midges, or, as the Indians call them, ?nosee- ems,? make travelling in the woods almost impossible; but now their reign was nearly over.

Table of Contents
Table of Contents: Ktaadn, 1 -- Chesuncook, 51 -- The Allegash and East Branch, 96 -- Appendix, 184 -- I. TREES., 184 -- II. FLOWERS AND SHRUBS., 185 -- III. LIST OF PLANTS., 188 -- IV. LIST OF BIRDS, 196 -- V. QUADRUPEDS., 197 -- VI. OUTFIT FOR AN EXCURSION., 198 -- VII. A LIST OF INDIAN WORDS., 199


 
 



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