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Fritz Dufour's Philosophical Essay on the Works of Louise-Victorine Ackermann : My life, First poems, Philosophical poems (1877) - Translated from French and with a philosophical essay by Fritz Dufour (2017)

By Dufour, Fritz

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Book Id: WPLBN0100002416
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Reproduction Date: 4/25/2017

Title: Fritz Dufour's Philosophical Essay on the Works of Louise-Victorine Ackermann : My life, First poems, Philosophical poems (1877) - Translated from French and with a philosophical essay by Fritz Dufour (2017)  
Author: Dufour, Fritz
Volume:
Language: English
Subject: Non Fiction, Philosophy
Collections: Authors Community, Philosophy
Historic
Publication Date:
2017
Publisher: Self-Published
Member Page: Fritz Dufour

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Linguist, Mba, Des, F. D. (2017). Fritz Dufour's Philosophical Essay on the Works of Louise-Victorine Ackermann : My life, First poems, Philosophical poems (1877) - Translated from French and with a philosophical essay by Fritz Dufour (2017). Retrieved from http://www.self.gutenberg.org/


Description
Louise Victorine-Ackermann was a French poet. Her works were originally written in French, in verses and in rhymes. Reading this outstanding work is transcendental. I compare it to walking inside an empty cathedral, sitting by the seaside alone or lying on your back to gaze at the stars on a balmy summer night. I had a unique experience reading My life – First poems – Philosophical poems. I hope you will too. I invite you to enjoy to the last verse this powerful work from Louise-Victorine Ackermann. Also, please read my essay at the end, starting at page 152 – or you may read it first to better appreciate Ackermann’s work.

Summary
If poetry is a literary work in which special intensity is given to the expression of feelings and ideas , Ackermann epitomizes it thanks to her work. Yes, the feelings she expressed in her work are intense and special. Some of what she doesn’t mention in her autobiography is revealed through her poems. That makes her a true poet. The symbiosis between Ackermann and poetry is evident. Nevertheless, after 140 years since the publication of the work, there is still a lot of mysteries or questions that remain whole. Why didn’t she have any children for a man she loved and with whom she spent two years? Was it because of the childhood she had and which she didn’t want her own children to experience? Was it because her role model was her father, not her mother? Was she or her husband infertile? Why didn’t she have a love life after her husband’s death? Was it because she stopped believing in love or was it because she’s always been skeptical about love in the first place? Was it because poetry was more important to her and she was reluctant to have to hide her writings from a potential lover like she did for her late husband? In her autobiography, she hints at the answer a little bit by saying that she could have done without love all her life and that she ended up being with her husband only because she appreciated the attention. But, when trying to discover who the poet was, let’s not use this confession as a qualifier to conclude that she was an ice maiden. She was just being cautious because her intuition warned her about how devastating passionate love can be (I wrote amply on the matter in my analysis of Love). Thus, we know a little bit as far as her decision not to have a love life after her husband’s death. Of course, the answers to other questions would help understand better who she was, but, unfortunately, I don’t know. However, these pending questions have no impact on her reputation as a true poet and are unable to prevent us from taking her work for what it is: a medley of beautifully written verses projecting, subtly, some powerful philosophical views in a century where there were few female writers, both in France and Germany where she spent a great deal of time.

Excerpt
What, who, where, when, why, and how are probably the immediate questions to which you’d like to have answers if you’re reading this essay. If you’ve read the section entitled My life, I’m assuming you already have an idea regarding the first four questions and you’re more interested in the last two. Let me start by saying there is no simple and clear-cut answer to any of these questions. But, before I get to the above-mentioned questions, I’d like to take the opportunity to say what this essay is, meaning what kind or what form of essay is it, in addition to being philosophical in terms of content. As far as the form is concerned, it’s two-pronged. First, it’s a dialectic essay. On the several topics addressed, I present a thesis – short but to the point – and an argument. Then I attempt to object to my own argument, to which I object with a counterargument, but then I counter the counterargument with a final and new argument. This is a technique called Chinese dragon strategy. Second, the essay is critical. Like the work itself, my arguments, although protean, revolve around a recurring issue: suffering and pain. The four noble truths state that “1) All existence is characterized by suffering 2) All suffering is caused by desire 3) Therefore, desire and suffering can be overcome 4) The way to overcome desire and suffering is to follow the eightfold noble path”. I’d like to say right now that my goal isn’t to demonstrate whether desire and suffering can be overcome nor to speculate on the eightfold noble paths. Ackermann didn’t do it either. This essay doesn’t just look at Ackermann’s work. It looks through and beyond it. Now, let’s go back to our six questions. Philosophical in nature, this essay is an attempt to fathom and explain the work itself (what), the character and temperament of its author – nature and nurture (who), the context in which the work is written – what impact did the environments in which she evolved have on her personality and her work? (where). Stating the date of the work isn’t sufficient. An analysis of the period and its events are also in order (when). Reading Ackermann’s autobiography, one has a sense of the reasons behind such an iconoclast work, but there is more beneath the surface. The true motive(s) surface only if one resorts to philosophy (why). Ackermann resorts to a myriad of themes not necessarily philosophical to make a philosophical point, using, of course, poetry (how). At this point, perhaps none of what I just said meet your expectations as far as the six questions are concerned. All right, to simplify it, let’s say for now this is a collection of poems written by some 19th-century French poet by the name of Louise-Victorine Ackermann – born Choquet – between France and Germany from adolescence – 1829 – up until 1877 by using poetry because she liked to write. Is that better? Not quite! If that was the case, the purpose of this essay would be abased and it wouldn’t do justice to the work, albeit acceptable from a practical standpoint. Let’s go back to the first four questions. With respect to why and how, enough arguments can be found in the body of the essay, which sheds light on these two questions.......The essay is done in relation to metaphysics, ethics, and logic. I propose a few recommendations as to how to go about making ethics prevail. Although I will offer my views, but I will do so by abiding by the principle of alterity or otherness, meaning that I will keep in mind that Ackermann’s work stems from her personal experience. Therefore, I’m unable to say that Ackermann should have felt this way or that way. Her work speaks of her own personal experience. Thus, thanks to alterity, it’s incumbent upon me to oppose identity, meaning I have to recognize Ackermann in her difference. In many respects, a literary work is akin to a painting, a symphony, which doesn’t take long to become frozen in time, and no one else can edit nor finish it if it was unfinished. However, I will conclude by taking a stand vis-à-vis Ackermann’s work as a whole instead of the individual.

Table of Contents
TABLE OF CONTENTS Presentation of Louise-Victorine Ackermann……………….………………………………………..........3 About the translation…………………………………………………………………………...………...3 A- Works of Louise-Victorine Ackermann I- My life…………………………………...…………………………………………….........5 II- First poems……………………………………………………………………...…….........13 III- Philosophical poems………………………………………………………………...……..57 B- Philosophical essay (by Fritz Dufour) Prologue……………………………………………………………………………………………...153 Philosophical analysis of Louise-Victorine Ackermann’s work………………………………………..158 1. Love…………………………………………………………………………………….158 a. Eros……………………………………………………………………………..159 b. Philia………………………………………………………………………….....160 c. Agape…………………………………………………………………………...161 d. Love and Ethics………………………………………………………....……….161 e. Pacifism………………………………………………………………………....162 f. Just war theory…………………………………………………………………..164 g. An ethical or moral dilemma…………………………………………………….164 2. Nature…………………………………………………………………………………...168 a. Animism………………………………………………………………………..168 i. Ecosophy……………………………………………………………….169 ii. Deep ecology…………………………………………………………...169 iii. Ecocide-geocide………………………………………………………...170 iv. Speciesism……………………………………………………………...171 v. Phylogenetics…………………………………………………………...174 b. Animism: fact or fiction?..…………………………………………………….....174 3. Time……………………………………………………………………………………178 4. Positivism………………………………………………………………………………182 5. Faith……………………………………………………………………………………183 a. Atheism………………………………………………………………………...184 b. Amoralism versus amorality…………………………………………………….186 c. Theodicy……………………………………………………………………......187 d. Supererogation…………………………………………………………...……..190 6. Seeking an answer……………………………………………………………………....195 a. Axiarchism……………………………………………………………………..195 b. Christianity, a conjunctive concept………………………………………………197 i. Christianity is experiential………………………………………………198 ii. Christianity is emotional………………………………………………...199 iii. Christianity is practical………………………………………………….200 iv. Christianity is ritual……………………………………………………..200 v. Christianity is dogmatic………………………………………………....201 vi. Christianity is philosophical…………………………………………….203 vii. Christianity is mythological and narrative……………………………….204 viii. Christianity is ethical…………………………………………………....205 ix. Christianity is social and institutional…………………………………....206 c. Lady Philosophy………………………………………………………………..207 7. Comparisons...………………………………………………………………………….210 a. Ackermann and Plato………………………………………......……………….210 b. Ackermann and Aristotle……………………………………………..………....211 c. Ackermann and Michel de Montaigne…………………………………..………211 d. Ackermann and Blaise Pascal………………..………………………………….213 e. Ackermann and Victor Hugo………………..…………………………………..213 8. Scope…………………………………………………………………………………...214 Epilogue…………………………………………………………………………………………….217 Recommendations…………………………………………………………………………..220 Looking towards the future………………………………………………………………….221

 

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