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Ruin

By: Neil Azevedo

Ruin is a tale that is not a tale. It is a microscopic peering into the unpleasant fabric of human sustainability. It is a real person wrought by sabotaging the very nature of storytelling. It is a description of love, that is, the deliberate perversion of it in order to fulfill one's needs, which is to say it is the banal record of everyday life. It is a collection of details that follow the details that preceded it in A Book of Nightmares. It is not a happy book. It is full of elegiac contemplation on suffering, helplessness, holiness and unrelenting sexual isolation. It is blunt and graphic and painfully beautiful. It has little plot, and no punctuation, and might, just might, be the poetry for which America has been unconsciously waiting....

there is only love in its various forms and manifestations and by it we either see or we do not see it has been eight years since my last report I am home again if this house can be said to have been a home to me or rather if it can still so be called many years have scampered in and eaten away at what I remember was a modest structure with a mild economical luster ......

Epigraph Ruin About the Author About William Ralph Press

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A Vomit of Diamonds

By: Boripat Lebel

AVoD is a long, short story ​full of pizzazz​ and physics​; perfect for the reader who can appreciate delusions of grandeur and stomach words such as tensors and geodesics....

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These Details in Preference to Nothing

By: Neil Azevedo

These Details in Preference to Nothing is the story of a relationship, or rather it’s a meditation on one, that is, a mediation on love, faith and an existence caught in transition told from a perspective not fully capable of seeing all angles. The narrative is in the first person and in the present tense as is every love affair between very young adults. The title sums up a lot—These Details in Preference to Nothing—a line lifted from Becket. To quote John Barth “heartfelt ineptitude has its appeal and so does heartless skill; but what you want is passionate virtuosity.” A story told in intense moments of meditative stupor, it sometimes reads more like poetry, and so it began as an extended sonnet sequence, but emerged into this record—to be added to all the others throughout history--of the truth in the sincere and authentic passion of the young, or at least some of the relevant and more illustrative details. ISBN: 978-1-932023-36-7. https://www.facebook.com/williamralpheditions...

I have begun every impulse to speak with hesitation, suspended on the edge of doubt, mindful of my inability to say how it was. It was the year of the roar of lions, humid nights, the soft breaths of waterweeds and kisses. It was the first year alone with my son. I had always had enemies of my sleep. I had come to know them. My response was always hesitation. The world was very large. It was true that a specific combination of things often conspired to lead my telling what happened back to an ecstasy of memories of melancholy and through a long, long night. Saudade the Portuguese say, the sadness inside each joy. All my life I have been haunted by a dream of heaven.  It was true. For me, anyway, for the way I told things, and the way I have always told them. I was somewhat absent of myself where the words came to carry the telling from me. I was touched by the words the way the butterfly wants to be still in the hands of the breeze, to be untangled from the air that makes the soft current, carries the preliminary push, something unformed and unclear, to be unsnarled from the waft, to be unfurled as the sound from the trees, to be...

These Details in Preference to Nothing About the Author Also from William Ralph Press

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The Bald Boy Keloglan and the Most Beautiful Girld in the World

By: Ph.D. HB Paksoy

Before we ascend to the thoughts and deeds of Keloğlan, it may be desirable to explore the foundations of Turkish oral literature, which enjoys its share of archetypes. One such internationally known character is Nasreddin Hoja (or, Hoca), representing the voice of reason in a witty manner. On one occasion, Nasreddin borrows a kazan (large cauldron) from his neighbor. When Nasreddin returns the kazan, the neighbor sees that there is a small cooking pot in the bottom. He asks Nasreddin: "What is this?" Nasreddin replies: "Apparently the kazan had been pregnant and it has given birth to this small pot." The neighbor unquestioningly accepts the kazan and the pot. Some weeks later, Nasreddin wishes to borrow the same kazan. The neighbor is only too happy to oblige. This time, a month passes. The neighbor calls on Nasreddin to inquire about his kazan. Nasreddin, with a concerned look, announces: "I am sorry, but your kazan died." The neighbor is puzzled. Then becoming angry, he demands: "How could it die?" "You believed that it gave birth, why do you not believe that it died?" ...

On another celebrated occasion, which took place over some eight centuries ago, Nasreddin again demonstrates the necessity of experimental science and reasoning: One day Nasreddin brings home three pounds of meat, expecting his wife to cook it for dinner. At dinner-time, Nasreddin finds no meat on the table. He asks his wife, "What happened to the meat?" His wife replies, "The cat ate it." Nasreddin breezes into the kitchen, puts the cat on the scales, and discovers the cat to be weighing three pounds. Nasreddin quizzically questions the result, "If the meat I brought home weighed three pounds, then, where is the cat? And, if this happens to be the cat, then what happened to the meat?" ...

Table of Contents Preface Introduction Keloğlan from Dream to Throne Keloğlan and His Wise Brother Tekerleme The Keloğlan Who Would Not Tell The Keloğlan Who Guarded the Door How Keloğlan Stole Köroğlu’s Horse, Kırat, for Hasan Pasa Man Persecuted Beause of Wife’s Great Beauty How Hasan and Hasan Differed from Hasan The Heavy Headed Keloğlan The Magic Bird, The Magic Fruit, and the Magic Stick The Pomegranate Thief and the Padişah’s Sons The Blind Padişah with Three Sons The Padişah’s Youngest Son as Dragon-Slayer Keloğlan as Dead Bridegroom How Keloğlan Got a Bride for a Chickpea Keloğlan and the Sheep in the Sea Keloğlan and the Sheep in the River Keloğlan and the Lost but Recovered Ring Keloğlan and the Deceived Judge The Maligned Maiden Keloğlan and the Mirror The Successful Youngest Daughter The Shepherd Who Came as Ali and Returned as a Girl Keloğlan and the Girl Who Traveled Nightly to the Other World The Keloğlan and the Padişah’s Youngest Daughter The Shepherd Who Married a Princess But Became Padişah of Another Country Keloğlan Turns the Shoes How Keloğlan Drowned His Mother-in-Law Keloğlan an...

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Pamphilia to Amphilanthus

By: Lady Mary Wroth

Pamphilia to Amphilanthus is the first sonnet sequence written by an Englishwoman. Published in 1621, the poems invert the usual format of sonnet sequences by making the speaker a woman (Pamphilia, whose name means all-loving) and the beloved a man (Amphilanthus, whose name means lover of two.). It is possible that Wroth based the story on her own fraught relationship with her cousin, William Herbert. (Summary by Elizabeth Klett.)...

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Faith of Men, The

By: Jack London

A collection of short stories by author Jack London

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Bartleby the Scrivener, A Story of Wall Street.

By: Herman Melville

Bartleby the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street is a short story by Herman Melville. The story first appeared, anonymously, in Putnam's Magazine in two parts. The first part appeared in November 1853, with the conclusion published in December 1853. It was reprinted in Melville's The Piazza Tales in 1856 with minor textual alterations. The work is said to have been inspired, in part, by Melville's reading of Emerson, and some have pointed to specific parallels to Emerson's essay, The Transcendentalist. The story has been adapted twice: once in 1970, starring Paul Scofield, and again in 2001, starring Crispin Glover. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartleby...

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Mosaic : A Global Writers' Spotlight, Volume 1

By: Reading/Writing Center BYU-Hawaii, Compiler; Erin Baker, Editor

The Mosaic is a collection of writing from international students at Brigham Young University-Hawaii. Read poetry, short stories and personal experiences by students from more than 10 different countries as they use English as a common language to share what matters in their lives....

...I grew up on my family’s small farm and helped my parents in their everyday work. I stayed on the farm without going school. I did not go far away from home; I stayed to help my parents. When I turned seven, my parents told me that I needed to go to school, which was 20 km away from our home, in a small town. I was excited, and I could not wait to go to school. On September 1st of 1991, by 7 AM, I was ready to leave my home. Mum and I rode on horseback and started our journey to the school. She enrolled me in the school and a school dorm, and left me there. She said she would come back to pick me up on Friday......

Who Am I? My Evil Sister Vs. My Evil Self Three Dreams Where the Light Enters You Teach me How to Dance Almost the End of the World The Book of Mormon Saving the Face of Hawaii Nature My Best The Broadway Incident The Biggest Disappointment Peculiar Letter from Hell Oye Tu! Remember not to Forget Globalization: Good or Bad for Developing Countries? Comfort Stations Homecoming Nature Mistaking Process Journey for Education ...

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Vicar of Wakefield, The

By: Oliver Goldsmith

Published in 1766 'The Vicar of Wakefield' was Oliver Goldsmith's only novel. It was thought to have been sold to the publisher for £60 on Oliver Goldsmith's behalf by Dr Johnson to enable Goldsmith to pay off outstanding rent and to release himself from his landlady's arrest. It is the story of the family of Dr Primrose, a benevolent vicar, and follows them through their fall from fortune and their ultimate rise again. The story provides insight into family life and circumstances in the mid 18th century and the plot has many aspects of a pantomime like quality: Impersonation, deception, an aristocratic villain and the abduction of a beautiful heroine. Goldsmith himself dissipated his savings on gambling whilst a student at Trinity College Dublin and subsequently travelled in Europe sustaining himself by playing the flute and disputing doctrinal matters in monasteries and universities. Later he worked as an apothecary's assistant, a doctor and a school usher (experiences shared in this story by Dr Primrose's son). (Summary by Martin Clifton)...

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Tendresses

By: Various; Kline, Tony, Translator

Translations of poems in the European Languages from: Sappho, Catullus, Dante, Petrarch, Goethe, Leopardi, Pushkin, Heine, Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Mandelstam, Machado, Akhmatova, Quasimodo, Celan, and Neruda....

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No Thoroughfare

By: Charles Dickens ; Wilkie Collins

Two boys from the Foundling Hospital are given the same name, with disastrous consequences in adulthood. Two associates, wishing to right the wrong, are commissioned to find a missing heir. Their quest takes them from fungous wine cellars in the City of London to the sunshine of the Mediterranean—across the Alps in winter. Danger and treachery would prevail were it not for the courage of the heroine and the faithful company servant. - The story contains crafted descriptions, well-drawn and diverse characters, eerie and exotic backgrounds, mystery, semi-concealed identities, brinkmanship with death, romance, the eventual triumph of Good over Evil, and many other elements expected in classic Dickens. - First published in 1867 there are thematic parallels with other books from Dickens' mature writings, including Little Dorrit (1857) and especially Our Mutual Friend (1865). The Listener will decide if this story yields insights into The Mystery of Edwin Drood (unfinished 1870). - Wilkie Collings collaborated with Charles Dickens to produce this ‘Christmas’ book and the stage play of the same name. In the book Collins assisted in Act 1 a...

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Victory: An Island Tale

By: Joseph Conrad

Recollections of the life of Axel Heyst, one-time manager of the liquidated Tropical Belt Coal Company in a fictitious island in the Pacific. After retreating from society in response to his professional failures, the misanthrope is drawn back by a romantic affair. (Introduction by S. Kovalchik)...

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Favourite Chapters Collection 001

By: Various

A collection of volunteers’ favourite chapters. Some were chosen for being the key chapter in a great novel, others for the wonderful clarity with which great ideas are expressed, and still others because the reader did a wonderful job. Whatever the reason they were chosen, we hope they will give you as much pleasure as they did us. (Summary by David Barnes)....

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Trials and Confessions of a Housekeeper

By: T. S. Arthur

Is housekeeping such a trial? Mrs. Smith thinks so and confesses all in this merry account of her escapades and near disasters! (Summary by Kehinde)

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Notes from the Underground

By: Fyodor Dostoyevsky

Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s short masterpiece about a ranting, slightly mad civil servant. The stylistic inventiveness, and the insights into the absurdities and weakness of humans seem so fresh and incisive today that if published now (a century and a half later) Notes would be considered an avant-garde post-modernist triumph. In some ways this is a heavy text, laden with conversational philosophizing; but the vividness of the narrator make it a wonderful read, and funny. (Review by Hugh McGuire)...

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Gone to Earth

By: Mary Webb

Gone to Earth is the cry of fox hunters as the fox takes to its den and they lose the chase. Here, Mary Webb tells the story of Hazel Woodus whose understanding of her half tame fox cub contrasts with her misunderstanding of humanity. She is pursued by two very different men, the Squire of the Manor and the local Minister. Mary Webb wrote this book in 1917 and it is set in rural Shropshire of the late 1800s. (Summary by Rachel Lintern)...

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Main Street

By: Sinclair Lewis

Carol Milford is a liberal, free-spirited young woman, reared in the metropolis of Minneapolis. She marries Will Kennicott, a doctor, who is a small-town boy at heart. When they marry, Will convinces her to live in his home-town of Gopher Prairie, Minnesota. Carol is appalled at the backwardness of Gopher Prairie. But her disdain for the town's physical ugliness and smug conservatism compels her to reform it. (Summary from Wikipedia)....

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Of Human Bondage

By: W. Somerset Maugham

Of Human Bondage , published in 1915, is considered to be W. Somerset Maugham’s best work. Many believe the novel to be one of the world’s literary masterpieces. The story follows Phillip Carey from early childhood through his 30’s. Orphaned at 9, Phillip spends his early years raised by his childless aunt and uncle. His aunt tries to be a mother to Philip, but she is unsure how to behave whereas his uncle, a vicar, takes a cold disposition towards him. Philip is sent to a boarding school but his shyness and his club foot make it difficult for him to fit in. The novel follows this theme throughout as Phillip travels to Germany, France, and England, makes new acquaintances, searches for his life’s calling, and experiences romantic episodes. Mildred in particular, will leave you wondering about Phillip's obsession and passion for such a woman. More than a few of us have had “our Mildred”. The characters in Of Human Bondage are real-life with faults, qualities, and feelings that Maugham describes so vividly. It would not be unusual that we have encountered individuals with traits similar to the characters in this book. At times the emo...

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International Episode, An

By: Henry James

Two men visting the US from London meet a pair of charming women who return the visit the following year in London. Romantic intrigues, miscommunication and cultural faux pas abound in this short but delightful novel. (Summary written by Kristen McQuillin)...

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Return of the Native, The

By: Thomas Hardy

Like all of Hardy's work, The Return of the Native (1878) is passionate and controversial, with themes and sympathies beyond what a good Victorian would ever admit. A modern and honest novel of chance and choice, faith and infidelities, this dark story asks what is free will and what is fate? What is the true nature of nature, and how do we fit together? Can we fit together? A tragedy set in the barren land of Edgon Heath. Our heroine, Eustacia, is proud, passionate, cruel, fickle, avaricious, and desperate. She burns every life she touches, never able to find the mad love and exotic world she dreams of. Our supposed hero, Clym, is modest, steady, plain, moral, and dutiful. He is satisfied returning from Paris to the simple comfort of home. When they come together, the Heath will come apart. Originally released as five books, in classic tragic form, a sixth, tacking on a 'happy ending', was added by editor and public pressure. (Summary by Marlo Dianne)...

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