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World's Best Moms : A Collection of Memories

By: Editor Bob, Compiler

A collection of stories and testimonials from countries around the world to celebrate mothers who taught their children how to live and how to love, and the children who fondly relive all moments spent with their mothers... Stories that remind you of all the things your mom did for you and you never realized. A dedication to mothers all over the world for their selfless love and care....

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The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Sampson and Gregory, with Swords and Bucklers, of the House of Capulet. Sampson. Gregory: A my word wee?l not carry coales. Greg. No, for then we should be Colliars. Samp. I mean, if we be in choller, wee?l draw. Greg. I, While you live, draw your necke out o?th Collar. Samp. I strike quickly, being mov?d. Greg. But thou art not quickly mov?d to strike. Samp. A dog of the house of Mountague, moves me. Greg. To move, is to stir: and to be valiant, is to stand: Therefore, if thou art mov?d, thou runst away. Samp. A dogge of that house shall move me to stand. I will take the wall of any Man or Maid of Mountagues. Greg. That shewes thee a weake slave, for the wea-kest goes to the wall. Samp. True, and therefore women being the weaker Vessels, are ever thrust to the wall: therefore I will push Mountagues men from the wall, and thrust his Maides to the wall. Greg. The Quarrell is betweene our Masters, and us |(their men. Samp. ?Tis all one, I will shew my selfe a tyrant: when I have fought with the men, I will bee civill with the Maids, and cut off their head...

Table of Contents: The Tragedie of Romeo and Juliet, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1

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The Third Part of Henry the Sixth

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Third Part of Henry the Sixth with the Death of the Duke of Yorke; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Alarum. Enter Plantagenet, Edward, Richard, Norfolke, Mount-ague, Warwicke, and Souldiers. Warwicke. I Wonder how the King escap?d our hands? Pl. While we pursu?d the Horsmen of y North, He slyly stole away, and left his men: Whereat the great Lord of Northumberland, Whose Warlike eares could never brooke retreat, Chear?d up the drouping Army, and himselfe. Lord Clifford and Lord Stafford all abrest Charg?d our maine Battailes Front: and breaking in, Were by the Swords of common Souldiers slaine. Edw. Lord Staffords Father, Duke of Buckingham, Is either slaine or wounded dangerous. I cleft his Beauer with a down- right blow: That this is true (Father) behold his blood. Mount. And Brother, here?s the Earle of Wiltshires |(blood, Whom I encountred as the Battels joyn?d. Rich. Speake thou for me, and tell them what I did. Plan. Richard hath best deseru?d of all my sonnes: But is your Grace dead, my Lord of Somerset? Nor. Such hope have all the line of John of Gaunt. Rich. Thus do I hope to shake King Henries head. Warw. And s...

Table of Contents: The third Part of Henry the Sixt, 2 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 2

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The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke : A Study with the Text of the Folio of 1623

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Hamlet; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Barnardo and Francisco, two Centinels. Barnardo. Who?s there? Fran. Nay answer me: Stand & unfold your selfe. Bar. Long live the King. Fran. Barnardo? Bar. He. Fran. You come most carefully upon your houre. Bar. ?Tis now strook twelve, get thee to bed Francisco. Fran. For this releefe much thankes: ?Tis bitter cold, And I am sicke at heart. Barn. Have you had quiet Guard? Fran. Not a Mouse stirring. Barn. Well, goodnight. If you do meet Horatio and Marcellus, the Riuals of my Watch, bid them make hast. Enter Horatio and Marcellus. Fran. I thinke I heare them. Stand: who?s there? Hor. Friends to this ground. Mar. And Leigemen to the Dane. Fran. Give you good night. Mar. O farwel honest Soldier, who hath reliev?d you? Fra. Barnardo ha?s my place: give you goodnight. Exit Fran. Mar. Holla Barnardo. Bar. Say, what is Horatio there? Hor. A peece of him. Bar. Welcome Horatio, welcome good Marcellus. Mar. What, ha?s this thing appear?d againe to night. Bar. I have seene nothing. Mar. Horatio saies, ?tis but our Fantasie, And will not let beleefe take hold of him Touchin...

Table of Contents: The Tragedie of Hamlet, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 5 -- Scena Tertia., 11 -- Actus Secundus., 20 -- Scena Secunda., 23...

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The Tragedy of Richard the Third

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Richard the Third with the Landing of Earle Richmond, and the Battell at Bosworth Field; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Richard Duke of Gloster, solus. Now is the Winter of our Discontent, Made glorious Summer by this Son of Yorke: And all the clouds that lowr?d upon our house In the deepe bosome of the Ocean buried. Now are our browes bound with Victorious Wreathes, Our bruised armes hung up for Monuments; Our sterne Alarums chang?d to merry Meetings; Our dreadfull Marches, to delightfull Measures. Grim- visag?d Warre, hath smooth?d his wrinkled Front: And now, in stead of mounting Barbed Steeds, To fright the Soules of fearfull Adversaries, He capers nimbly in a Ladies Chamber, To the lascivious pleasing of a Lute. But I, that am not shap?d for sportive trickes, Nor made to court an amorous Looking- glasse: I, that am Rudely stampt, and want loves Majesty, To strut before a wonton ambling Nymph: I, that am curtail?d of this faire Proportion, Cheated of Feature by dissembling Nature, Deform?d, un finish?d, sent before my time Into this breathing World, scarse halfe made up, And that so lamely and unf...

Table of Contents: The Tragedie of Richard the Third, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 5 -- Scena Tertia., 11 -- Scena Quarta., 19 -- Actus Secundus. Scoena Prima., 25 -- Scena Secunda., 29 -- Scena Tertia., 32 -- Scena Quarta., 34 -- Actus Tertius. Scoena Prima., 35 -- Scena Secunda., 40 -- Scena Tertia., 44 -- Scaena Quarta., 44 -- Actus Quartus. Scena Prima., 55 -- Scena Secunda., 58 -- Scena Tertia., 62 -- Scena Quarta., 75 -- Actus Quintus. Scena Prima., 75 -- Scena Secunda., 76...

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The Sea Wolf

By: Jack London

Excerpt: Chapter I; I SCARCELY know where to begin, though I sometimes facetiously place the cause of it all to Charley Furuseth?s credit. He kept a summer cottage in Mill Valley, under the shadow of Mount Tamalpais, and never occupied it except when he loafed through the winter months and read Nietzsche and Schopenhaver to rest his brain. When summer came on, he elected to sweat out a hot and dusty existence in the city and to toil incessantly. Had it not been my custom to run up to see him every Saturday afternoon and to stop over till Monday morning, this particular January Monday morning would not have found me afloat on San Francisco Bay. Not but that I was afloat in a safe craft, for the Martinez was a new ferrysteamer, making her fourth or fifth trip on the run between Sausalito and San Francisco. The danger lay in the heavy fog which blanketed the bay, and of which, as a landsman, I had little apprehension. In fact, I remember the placid exaltation with which took up my position on the forward upper deck, directly beneath the pilot-house, and allowed the mystery of the fog to lay hold of my imagination. A fresh breeze was bl...

Table of Contents: Chapter I, 1 -- Chapter II, 8 -- Chapter III, 14 -- Chapter IV, 24 -- Chapter V, 29 -- Chapter VI, 35 -- Chapter VII, 46 -- Chapter VIII, 49 -- Chapter IX, 55 -- Chapter X, 62 -- Chapter XI, 67 -- Chapter XII, 72 -- Chapter XIII, 80 -- Chapter XIV, 84 -- Chapter XV, 91 -- Chapter XVI, 96 -- Chapter XVII, 102 -- Chapter XVIII, 113 -- Chapter XIX, 119 -- Chapter XX, 125 -- Chapter XXI, 132 -- Chapter XXII, 136 -- Chapter XXIII, 139 -- Chapter XXIV, 143 -- Chapter XXV, 149 -- Chapter XXVI, 160 -- Chapter XXVII, 170 -- Chapter XXVIII, 177...

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The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eighth: A Historical Play

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eighth; THE PROLOGUE -- I Come no more to make you laugh, Things now, That beare a Weighty, and a Serious Brow, Sad, high, and working, full of State and Woe: Such Noble Scoenes, as draw the Eye to flow We now present. Those that can Pitty, heere May (if they thinke it well) let fall a Teare, The Subject will deserve it. Such as give Their Money out of hope they may beleeve, May heere finde Truth too....

Table of Contents: The Famous History of the Life of King Henry the Eight, 1 -- THE PROLOGVE., 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 2 -- Scena Secunda., 8 -- Scaena Tertia., 13 -- Scena Quarta., 15 -- Actus Secundus. Scena Prima., 19 -- Scena Secunda., 24 -- Scena Tertia., 27 -- Scena Quarta., 30 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 37 -- Scena Secunda., 41 -- Actus Quartus. Scena Prima., 53 -- Scena Secunda., 57 -- Actus Quintus. Scena Prima., 62 -- Scena Secunda., 67 -- Scena Tertia., 73 -- Scena Quarta., 75...

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The Taming of the Shrew

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Taming of the Shrew; Actus Primus -- Scaena Prima -- Enter Begger and Hostes, Christophero Sly. Begger. Ile pheeze you infaith. Host. A paire of stockes you rogue. Beg. Y?are a baggage, the Slies are no Rogues. Looke in the Chronicles, we came in with Richard Conqueror: therefore Paucas pallabris, let the world slide: Sessa. Host. You will not pay for the glasses you have burst? Beg. No, not a deniere: go by S[aint]. Jeronimie, goe to thy cold bed, and warme thee. Host. I know my remedie, I must go fetch the Head- borough. Beg. Third, or fourth, or fifth Borough, Ile answere him by Law. Ile not budge an inch boy: Let him come, and kindly. Falles asleepe. Winde hornes. Enter a Lord from hunting, with his traine. Lo. Huntsman I charge thee, tender wel my hounds, Brach Meriman, the poore Curre is imbost, And couple Clowder with the deepe- mouth?d brach, Saw?st thou not boy how Silver made it good At the hedge corner, in the couldest fault, I would not loose the dogge for twentie pound. Hunts. Why Belman is as good as he my Lord, He cried upon it at the meerest losse, And twice to day pick?d out the dullest sent, Trust me, ...

Table of Contents: The Taming of the Shrew, 1 -- Actus primus. Scaena Prima., 1 -- Actus Tertia., 29 -- Actus Quartus. Scena Prima., 44 -- Actus Quintus., 56...

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The First Part of Henry the Fourth. Edited by Frederic W. Moorman

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The First Part of Henry the Fourth with the Life and Death of Henry Sirnamed Hot-Spurred; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter the King, Lord John of Lancaster, Earle of Westmerland, with others. King. So shaken as we are, so wan with care, Finde we a time for frighted Peace to pant, And breath shortwinded accents of new broils To be commenc?d in Stronds afarre remote: No more the thirsty entrance of this Soile, Shall daube her lippes with her owne childrens blood: No more shall trenching Warre channell her fields, Nor bruise her Flowrets with the Armed hoofes Of hostile paces. Those opposed eyes, Which like the Meteors of a troubled Heaven, All of one Nature, of one Substance bred, Did lately meete in the intestine shocke, And furious cloze of civill Butchery, Shall now in mutuall well- beseeming rankes March all one way, and be no more oppos?d Against Acquaintance, Kindred, and Allies. The edge of Warre, like an ill- sheathed knife, No more shall cut his Master. Therefore Friends, As farre as to the Sepulcher of Christ, Whose Souldier now under whose blessed Crosse We are impressed and ingag?d to fight, Forthwith a power...

Table of Contents: The First Part of Henry the Fourth, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1 -- Scaena Secunda., 3 -- Scoena Tertia., 8 -- Actus Secundus. Scena Prima., 15 -- Scaena Secunda., 17 -- Scoena Tertia., 20 -- Scena Quarta., 22 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 34 -- Scaena Secunda., 41 -- Scena Tertia., 45 -- Actus Quartus. Scoena Prima., 50 -- Scaena Secunda., 53 -- Scoena Tertia., 55 -- Scena Quarta., 58 -- Actus Quintus. Scena Prima., 59 -- Scena Secunda., 62 -- Scena Tertia., 66 -- Scaena Quarta., 70...

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The Tragedie of Cymbeline

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Cymbeline; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter two Gentlemen. Gent. You do not meet a man but Frownes. Our bloods no more obey the Heavens Then our Courtiers: Still seeme, as do?s the Kings. Gent. But what?s the matter? His daughter, and the heire of?s kingdome (whom He purpos?d to his wiues sole Sonne, a Widdow That late he married) hath referr?d her selfe Unto a poore, but worthy Gentleman. She?s wedded, Her Husband banish?d; she imprison?d, all Is outward sorrow, though I thinke the King Be touch?d at very heart. None but the King? He that hath lost her too: so is the Queene, That most desir?d the Match. But not a Courtier, Although they weare their faces to the bent Of the Kings lookes, hath a heart that is not Glad at the thing they scowle at. And why so? He that hath miss?d the Princesse, is a thing Too bad, for bad report: and he that hath her, (I meane, that married her, alacke good man, And therefore banish?d) is a Creature, such, As to seeke through the Regions of the Earth For one, his like; there would be something failing In him, that should compare. I do not thinke, So faire an Outward, and s...

Table of Contents: The Tragedie of Cymbeline, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 3 -- Scena Tertia., 6 -- Scena Quarta., 7 -- Scena Quinta., 8 -- Scena Sexta., 12 -- Scena Septima., 14 -- Actus Secundus. Scena Prima., 20 -- Scena Secunda., 21 -- Scena Tertia., 22 -- Scena Quarta., 26 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 32 -- Scena Secunda., 34 -- Scena Tertia., 36 -- Scena Quarta., 38 -- Scena Quinta., 43 -- Scena Sexta., 47 -- Scena Septima., 48 -- Scena Octaua., 50 -- Actus Quartus. Scena Prima., 51 -- Scena Secunda., 51 -- Scena Tertia., 62 -- Scena Quarta., 63 -- Actus Quintus. Scena Prima., 65 -- Scena Secunda., 66 -- Scena Tertia., 67 -- Scena Quarta., 69 -- Scena Quinta., 74...

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The Second Part of Henry the Fourth

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Second Part of Henry the Fourth Containing his Death and the Coronation of King Henry the Fifth; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- INDUCTION. Enter Rumour. Open your Eares: For which of you will stop The vent of Hearing, when loud Rumor speakes? I, from the Orient, to the drooping West (Making the winde my Post- horse) still unfold The Acts commenced on this Ball of Earth. Upon my Tongue, continuall Slanders ride, The which, in every Language, I pronounce, Stuffing the Eares of them with false Reports: I speake of Peace, while covert Enmitie (Under the smile of Safety) wounds the World: And who but Rumour, who but onely I Make fearfull Musters, and prepar?d Defence, Whil?st the bigge yeare, swolne with some other griefes, Is thought with childe, by the sterne Tyrant, Warre, And no such matter? Rumour, is a Pipe Blowne by Surmises, Ielousies, Conjectures; And of so easie, and so plaine a stop, That the blunt Monster, with uncounted heads, The still discordant, wavering Multitude, Can play upon it. But what neede I thus My well- knowne Body to Anathomize Among my houshold? Why is Rumour heere? I run before King Harries vict...

Table of Contents: The Second Part of Henry the Fourth, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 2 -- Scena Tertia., 7 -- Scena Quarta., 12 -- Actus Secundus. Scoena Prima., 14 -- Scena Secunda., 18 -- Scena Tertia., 22 -- Scaena Quarta., 24 -- Actus Tertius. Scena Prima., 32 -- Scena Secunda., 35 -- Actus Quartus. Scena Prima., 42 -- Scena Secunda., 53 -- Actus Quintus. Scoena Prima., 62 -- Scena Secunda., 64 -- Scena Tertia., 68 -- Scena Quarta., 71 -- Scena Quinta., 72 -- EPILOGVE., 74...

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The Chimes

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: FIRST QUARTER; THERE are not many people --and as it is desirable that a story-teller and a story-reader should establish a mutual understanding as soon as possible, I beg it to be noticed that I confine this observation neither to young people nor to little people, but extend it to all conditions of people: little and big, young and old: yet growing up, or already growing down again --there are not, I say, many people who would care to sleep in a church. I don?t mean at sermon-time in warm weather (when the thing has actually been done, once or twice), but in the night, and alone. A great multitude of persons will be violently astonished, I know, by this position, in the broad bold Day. But it applies to Night. It must be argued by night, and I will undertake to maintain it successfully on any gusty winter?s night appointed for the purpose, with any one opponent chosen from the rest, who will meet me singly in an old church-yard, before an old church-door; and will previously empower me to lock him in, if needful to his satisfaction, until morning ......

Table of Contents: ILLUSTRATION: TROTTY VECK., ii -- FIRST QUARTER, 1 -- THE SECOND QUARTER, 20 -- THIRD QUARTER, 36 -- FOURTH QUARTER, 52 -- ILLUSTRATION: MR. AND MRS. TUGBY., 68...

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The Prelude of 1805 in Thirteen Books

By: William Wordsworth

Excerpt: Book First; Introduction -- Childhood and School-time -- OH, there is blessing in this gentle breeze, That blows from the green fields and from the clouds And from the sky; it beats against my cheek, And seems half conscious of the joy it gives. O welcome messenger! O welcome friend! A captive greets thee, coming from a house Of bondage, from yon city?s walls set free, A prison where he hath been long immured. Now I am free, enfranchised and at large, May fix my habitation where I will. What dwelling shall receive me, in what vale Shall be my harbour, underneath what grove Shall I take up my home, and what sweet stream Shall with its murmurs lull me to my rest? The earth is all before me--with a heart Joyous, nor scared at its own liberty, I look about, and should the guide I chuse Be nothing better than a wandering cloud I cannot miss my way. I breathe again--Trances of thought and mountings of the mind Come fast upon me. It is shaken off, As by miraculous gift ?tis shaken off, That burthen of my own unnatural self, The heavy weight of many a weary day Not mine, and such as were not made for me. Long months of peace--if su...

Table of Contents: Book First Introduction: Childhood and School-time, 1 -- Book Second Childhood and School-time (Continued), 20 -- Book Third Residence at Cambridge, 34 -- Book Fourth Summer Vacation, 53 -- Book Fifth Books, 67 -- Book Sixth Cambridge and the Alps, 85 -- Book Seventh Residence in London, 105 -- Book Eighth Retrospect: Love of Nature Leading to Love of Mankind, 126 -- Book Ninth Residence in France, 150 -- Book Tenth Residence in France and French Revolution, 176 -- Book Eleventh Imagination, How Impaired and Restored, 205 -- Book Twelfth Same Subject (Continued), 217 -- Book Thirteenth Conclusion, 228...

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The Two Gentlemen of Verona

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Two Gentlemen of Verona; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Valentine: Protheus, and Speed. Valentine. Cease to perswade, my loving Protheus; Home- keeping youth, have ever homely wits, Wer?t not affection chaines thy tender dayes To the sweet glaunces of thy honour?d Love, I rather would entreat thy company, To see the wonders of the world abroad, Then (living dully sluggardiz?d at home) Weare out thy youth with shapelesse idlenesse. But since thou lou?st; love still, and thrive therein, Even as I would, when I to love begin. Pro. Wilt thou be gone? Sweet Valentine adew, Thinke on thy Protheus, when thou (hap?ly) seest Some rare note- worthy object in thy travaile. Wish me partaker in thy happinesse, When thou do?st meet good hap; and in thy danger, (If ever danger doe environ thee) Commend thy grievance to my holy prayers, For I will be thy beades- man, Valentine. Val. And on a love- booke pray for my successe? Pro. Upon some booke I love, I?le pray for thee. Val. That?s on some shallow Storie of deepe love, How yong Leander crost the Hellespont. Pro. That?s a deepe Storie, of a deeper love, For he was more then over- sho...

Table of Contents: The Two Gentlemen of Verona, 1 -- Actus primus, Scena prima., 1 -- Scoena Secunda., 4 -- Scoena Tertia., 7 -- Actus secundus: Scoena Prima., 10 -- Scoena secunda., 13 -- Scoena Tertia., 14 -- Scena Quarta., 15 -- Scena Quinta., 20 -- Scoena Sexta., 22 -- Scoena septima., 23 -- Actus Tertius, Scena Prima., 25 -- Scena Secunda., 33 -- Actus Quartus. Scoena Prima., 35 -- Scoena Secunda., 37 -- Scoena Tertia., 40 -- Scena Quarta., 42 -- Actus Quintus. Scoena Prima., 46 -- Scoena Secunda., 47 -- Scena Tertia., 48 -- Scoena Quarta., 48...

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The Life and Strange Surprizing Adventures of Robinson Crusoe, Of York, Mariner : Who Lived Eight and Twenty Years All Alone in an Un-Inhabited Island on the Coast of America, Near the Mouth of the Great River of Oroonoque; Having Been Cast on Shore by Shipwreck, Wherein All the Men Perished but Himself, With an Account How He Was at Last as Strangely Deliver'D by Pyrates

By: Daniel Defoe

Excerpt: THE PREFACE; If ever the story of any private Man?s Adventures in the World were worth making Publick, and were acceptable when Publish?d, the Editor of this Account thinks this will be so. The Wonders of this Man?s Life exceed all that (he thinks)is to be found extant; the Life of one Man being scarce capable of a greater Variety. The Story is told with Modesty, with Seriousness, and with a religious Application of Events to the Uses to which wise Men always apply them (viz.) to the Instruction of others by this Example, and to justify and honour the Wisdom of Providence in all the Variety of our Circumstances, let them happen how they will. The Editor believes the thing to be a just History of Fact; neither is there any Appearance of Fiction in it: And however thinks, because all such things are dispatch?d, that the Improvement of it, as well to the Diversion, as to the Instruction of the Reader, will be the same; and as such, he thinks, without father Compliment to the World, he does them a great Service in the Publication....

Table of Contents: THE PREFACE, 1 -- THE LIFE AND ADVENTURES OF ROBINSON CRUSOE, &c., 2 -- THE JOURNAL., 51

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Samson Agonistes

By: John Milton

Excerpt: Of that sort of Dramatic Poem which is call?d Tragedy; Tragedy, as it was antiently compos?d, hath been ever held the gravest, moralest, and most profitable of all other Poems: therefore said by Aristotle to be of power by raising pity and fear, or terror, to purge the mind of those and such like passions, that is to temper and reduce them to just measure with a kind of delight, stirr?d up by reading or seeing those passions well imitated. Nor is Nature wanting in her own effects to make good his assertion: for so in Physic things of melancholic hue and quality are us?d against melancholy, sowr against sowr, salt to remove salt humours. Hence Philosophers and other gravest Writers, as Cicero, Plutarch and others, frequently cite out of Tragic Poets, both to adorn and illustrate thir discourse....

Table of Contents: Of that sort of Dramatic Poem which is call?d Tragedy, 1 -- The ARGUMENT., 2 -- The Persons., 3 -- SAMSON Agonistes., 4

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Silas Marner

By: George Eliot

Excerpt: PART I; CHAPTER I -- IN the days when the spinning-wheels hummed busily in the farmhouses--and even great ladies, clothed in silk and thread-lace, had their toy spinning-wheels of polished oak --there might be seen in districts far away among the lanes, or deep in the bosom of the hills, certain pallid undersized men, who, by the side of the brawny country-folk, looked like the remnants of a disinherited race. The shepherd?s dog barked fiercely when one of these alien-looking men appeared on the upland, dark against the early winter sunset; for what dog likes a figure bent under a heavy bag? --and these pale men rarely stirred abroad without that mysterious burden. The shepherd himself, though he had good reason to believe that the bag held nothing but flaxen thread, or else the long rolls of strong linen spun from that thread, was not quite sure that this trade of weaving, indispensable though it was, could be carried on entirely without the help of the Evil One. In that far-off time superstition clung easily round every person or thing that was at all unwonted, or even intermittent and occasional merely, like the visits o...

Table of Contents: CHAPTER I, 1 -- CHAPTER II, 10 -- CHAPTER III, 16 -- CHAPTER IV, 25 -- CHAPTER V, 31 -- CHAPTER VI, 35 -- CHAPTER VII, 43 -- CHAPTER VIII, 48 -- CHAPTER IX, 55 -- CHAPTER X, 61 -- CHAPTER XI, 73 -- CHAPTER XII, 88 -- CHAPTER XIII, 93 -- CHAPTER XIV, 99 -- CHAPTER XV, 109 -- CHAPTER XVI, 110 -- CHAPTER XVII, 122 -- CHAPTER XVIII, 131 -- CHAPTER XIX, 134 -- CHAPTER XX, 142 -- CHAPTER XXI, 144 -- CONCLUSION, 147...

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Pride and Prejudice

By: Jane Austen

Excerpt: Chapter I; IT IS A TRUTH universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his first entering a neighbourhood, this truth is so well fixed in the minds of the surrounding families, that he is considered as the rightful property of some one or other of their daughters. ?My dear Mr. Bennet,? said his lady to him one day, ?have you heard that Netherfield Park is let at last?? Mr. Bennet replied that he had not. ?But it is,? returned she; ?for Mrs. Long has just been here, and she told me all about it.? Mr. Bennett made no answer. ?Do not you want to know who has taken it?? cried his wife impatiently. ?You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.? This was invitation enough....

Table of Contents: I 1 -- I 3 -- II 6 -- III 8 -- IV 12 -- V 15 -- VI 18 -- VII 24 -- VIII 29 -- IX 34 -- X 39 -- XI 45 -- XII 49 -- XIII 51 -- XIV 55 -- XV 58...

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The Portrait of a Lady

By: Henry James

Excerpt: CHAPTER 1; Under certain circumstances there are few hours in life more agreeable than the hour dedicated to the ceremony known as afternoon tea. There are circumstances in which, whether you partake of the tea or not--some people of course never do--the situation is in itself delightful. Those that I have in mind in beginning to unfold this simple history offered an admirable setting to an innocent pastime. The implements of the little feast had been disposed upon the lawn of an old English country-house, in what I should call the perfect middle of a splendid summer afternoon. Part of the afternoon had waned, but much of it was left, and what was left was of the finest and rarest quality. Real dusk would not arrive for many hours; but the flood of summer light had begun to ebb, the air had grown mellow, the shadows were long upon the smooth, dense turf. They lengthened slowly, however, and the scene expressed that sense of leisure still to come which is perhaps the chief source of one?s enjoyment of such a scene at such an hour. From five o?clock to eight is on certain occasions a little eternity; but on such an occasion a...

Table of Contents: CHAPTER 1, 1 -- CHAPTER 2, 10 -- CHAPTER 3, 15 -- CHAPTER 4, 22 -- CHAPTER 5, 28 -- CHAPTER 6, 38 -- CHAPTER 7, 46 -- CHAPTER 8, 54 -- CHAPTER 9, 60 -- CHAPTER 10, 66 -- CHAPTER 11, 77 -- CHAPTER 12, 83 -- CHAPTER 13, 92 -- CHAPTER 14, 104 -- CHAPTER 15, 113 -- CHAPTER 16, 125 -- CHAPTER 17, 135 -- CHAPTER 18, 141 -- CHAPTER 19, 154 -- CHAPTER 20, 170 -- CHAPTER 21, 181 -- CHAPTER 22, 187 -- CHAPTER 23, 202 -- CHAPTER 24, 210 -- CHAPTER 25, 221 -- CHAPTER 26, 227 -- CHAPTER 27, 238 -- CHAPTER 28, 247...

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Songs and Sonnets

By: John Donne

Excerpt: THE GOOD-MORROW; I WONDER by my troth, what thou, and I Did, till we lov?d? were we not wean?d till then? But suck?d on countrey pleasures, childishly? Or snorted we in the seaven sleepers den? T?was so; But this, all pleasures fancies bee. If ever any beauty I did see, Which I desir?d, and got, t?was but a dreame of thee. And now good morrow to our waking soules, Which watch not one another out of feare; For love, all love of other sights controules, And makes one little roome, an every where. Let sea-discoverers to new worlds have gone, Let Maps to other, worlds on worlds have showne, Let us possesse one world, each hath one, and is one. My face is thine eye, thine in mine appeares, And true plaine hearts doe in the faces rest, Where can we finde two better hemispheares Without sharpe North, without declining West? What ever dyes, was not mixt equally; If our two loves be one, or, thou and I Love so alike, that none doe slacken, none can die....

Table of Contents: THE GOOD-MORROW, 1 -- SONG, 2 -- WOMANS CONSTANCY, 3 -- THE UNDERTAKING, 4 -- THE SUNNE RISING, 5 -- THE INDIFFERENT, 6 -- LOVES USURY, 7 -- THE CANONIZATION, 8 -- THE TRIPLE FOOLE, 10 -- LOVERS INFINITENESSE, 11 -- SONG, 12 -- THE LEGACIE, 13 -- A FEAVER, 14 -- AIRE AND ANGELLS, 15 -- BREAKE OF DAY, 16 -- THE ANNIVERSARIE, 17 -- A VALEDICTION: OF MY NAME, IN THE WINDOW, 18 -- TWICKNAM GARDEN, 20 -- A VALEDICTION: OF THE BOOKE, 21 -- COMMUNITIE, 23 -- LOVES GROWTH, 24 -- LOVES EXCHANGE, 25 -- CONFINED LOVE, 27 -- THE DREAME, 28 -- A VALEDICTION: OF WEEPING, 29 -- LOVES ALCHYMIE, 30 -- THE FLEA, 31 -- THE CURSE, 32 -- THE MESSAGE, 33 -- A NOCTURNALL UPON S. LUCIES DAY, 34 -- WITCHCRAFT BY A PICTURE, 36 -- THE BAITE, 37 -- THE APPARITION, 38 -- THE BROKEN HEART, 39 -- A VALEDICTION: FORBIDDING MOURNING, 40 -- THE EXTASIE, 41 -- LOVES DEITIE, 43 -- LOVES DIET, 44 -- THE WILL, 45 -- THE FUNERALL, 47 -- THE BLOSSOME, 48 -- THE PRIMROSE, 49 -- THE RELIQUE, 50...

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