Search Results (44 titles)

Searched over 21.6 Million titles in 0.33 seconds

 
English (X) Cultural Studies (X) LibriVox Audio Books (X) Religion (X)

       
1
|
2
|
3
Records: 1 - 20 of 44 - Pages: 
  • Cover Image

First Apology of Justin Martyr, The

By: Saint Justin Martyr

The purpose of the Apology is to prove to the emperors, renowned as upright and philosophical men, the injustice of the persecution of the Christians, who are the representatives of true philosophy … Christians are the true worshipers of God, the Creator of all things; they offer him the only sacrifices worthy of him, those of prayer and thanksgiving, and are taught by his Son, to whom they assign a place next in honor to him. This teaching leads them to perfect morality, as shown in their teacher's words and their own lives, and founded on their belief in the resurrection. (Summary from Wikipedia)...

Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Summa Theologica - 03 Pars Prima, Angels and the Six Days

By: Saint Thomas Aquinas

The Summa Theologica (or the Summa Theologiae or simply the Summa, written 1265–1274) is the most famous work of Thomas Aquinas (c. 1225–1274) although it was never finished. It was intended as a manual for beginners as a compilation of all of the main theological teachings of that time. It summarizes the reasonings for almost all points of Christian theology in the West, which, before the Protestant Reformation, subsisted solely in the Roman Catholic Church. The Summa's topics follow a cycle: the existence of God, God's creation, Man, Man's purpose, Christ, the Sacraments, and back to God.(Summary adapted from the Wikipedia) These are parts three and four of six parts of the Pars Prima, consisting of questions regarding the Angels, and the Work of the Six Days....

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Life of the Spirit and the Life of Today, The

By: Evelyn Underhill

Underhill emphasizes the practical, here-and-now nature of spiritual life. She argues that spirituality is a genuine and abiding human fact, and that any complete description of human life must find room for the spiritual factor, and for the religious life in which it finds expression....

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

On Union with God

By: Blessed Albert the Great ; Albertus Magnus

Surely the most deeply-rooted need of the human soul, its purest aspiration, is for the closest possible union with God. As one turns over the pages of this little work, written by Blessed Albert the Great towards the end of his life, when that great soul had ripened and matured, one feels that here indeed is the ideal of one's hopes. (From the Preface)...

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Dhammapada, The

By: Unknown

The Dhammapada is is a Buddhist scripture, containing 423 verses in 26 categories. According to tradition, these are verses spoken by the Buddha on various occasions, most of which deal with ethics. It is is considered one of the most important pieces of Theravada literature. Despite this, the Dhammapada is read by many Mahayana Buddhists and remains a very popular text across all schools of Buddhism. - Excerpted from Wikipedia...

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Rosicrucian Mysteries, The

By: Max Heindel

A primer for those interested in the basic philosophy, beliefs & secrets of the Rosicrucians. (Summary by Kirk Ziegler)

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

On Loving God

By: Saint Bernard of Clairvaux

On Loving God is one of the best-known and most influential works of Medieval Christian mysticism. Written at the request of one of the cardinals of Rome, it describes the four “levels” of love for God, and puts Christian devotion in the context of God’s love for mankind. Summary by Kirsten Ferreri...

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

She-rab Dong-bu (The Tree of Wisdom)

By: Nagarjuna

The She-rab Dong-bu (Tree of Wisdom) is a metrical translation in Tibetan of a Sanscrit ethical work entitled Prajnya Danda, written by Nagarjuna who flourished in the fourth century of the Buddhist era (about 100 B.C.), The Tibetan version was probably made about the 11th century of our era but the exact date has not been determined. It is included in the Ten-gyur, section, volume གོ་, beginning at leaf 165. The Tibetan translator describes it as the second volume but I cannot say whether the remainder of the work has been preserved in Tibetan--the Sanscrit original is apparently lost. - W.L. Campbell...

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Truth About Jesus. Is He a Myth?, The

By: M. M. Mangasarian

The following work offers in book form the series of studies on the question of the historicity of Jesus, presented from time to time before the Independent Religious Society in Orchestra Hall, Chicago, 1909. No effort has been made to change the manner of the spoken, into the more regular form of the written, word. (Summary by M.M. Mangasarian (1859-1943) and Joanne Pauwels)...

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Orthodoxy (Version 2)

By: G. K. Chesterton

Orthodoxy is a book that has become a classic of Christian apologetics. In the book's preface Chesterton states the purpose is to attempt an explanation, not of whether the Christian faith can be believed, but of how he personally has come to believe it. In it, Chesterton presents an original view of the Christian religion. He sees it as the answer to natural human needs, the answer to a riddle in his own words, and not simply as an arbitrary truth received from somewhere outside the boundaries of human experience....

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Life of God in the Soul of Man, The

By: Henry Scougal

Henry Scougal was born in Scotland in 1650. The son of the Bishop of Aberdeen, he flourished under rigorous teaching to become Professor of Philosophy at King's College, Aberdeen. In 1672, Scougal was ordained minister in Auchterless and, after a year, returned to King's College as Professor of Divinity. He continued in this office until his death in 1678. The Life of God in the Soul of Ma is, in reality, a letter of doctrine and encouragement to a friend wavering in the faith, and was never intended for publication. Scougal dwells on three points in his epistle: the nature of true religion, the excellency and advantage of true religion, and the basic elements of true religion. As a whole, this writing reflects his peculiar marriage of scholarship to faith, learning to love. His was what one would call a practical piety, and he would assert it can only come from the life of God in the soul of man. (Introduction by Jenn Raimundo)...

Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Essay on the Creative Imagination

By: Théodule-Armand Ribot

It is quite generally recognized that psychology has remained in the semi-mythological, semi-scholastic period longer than most attempts at scientific formulization. For a long time it has been the spook science per se, and the imagination, now analyzed by M. Ribot in such a masterly manner, has been one of the most persistent, apparently real, though very indefinite, of psychological spooks. Whereas people have been accustomed to speak of the imagination as an entity sui generis , as a lofty something found only in long-haired, wild-eyed geniuses, constituting indeed the center of a cult, our author, Prometheus-like, has brought it down from the heavens, and has clearly shown that imagination is a function of mind common to all men in some degree, and that it is shown in as highly developed form in commercial leaders and practical inventors as in the most bizarre of romantic idealists. The only difference is that the manifestation is not the same. - Albert H. N. Baron, in translator's preface to Essai sur l'imagination créatrice...

Psychology, Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Arabic Hidden Words, The

By: Bahá'u'lláh

Kalimát-i-Maknúnih or The Hidden Words is a book written in Baghdad around 1857 by Bahá'u'lláh, the founder of the Bahá'í Faith. This work is written partly in Arabic and partly in Persian. The Hidden Words is written in the form of a collection of short utterances, 71 in Arabic and 82 in Persian, in which Bahá'u'lláh claims to have taken the basic essence of certain spiritual truths and written them in brief form. Bahá'ís are advised by `Abdu'l-Bahá, the son of Bahá'u'lláh to read them every day and every night and to implement its latent wisdom into their daily lives. He also said that The Hidden Words is a treasury of divine mysteries and that when one ponders its contents, the doors of the mysteries will open. The text of the Hidden Words is divided up into two sections: one from Arabic, and another from Persian. Each consist of several short, numbered passages. The Arabic has 71 passages, and the Persian has 82. This audiobook only contains the Arabic section. Each passage begins with an invocation, many of which repeat. Some common invocations include O Son of Spirit, O Son of Man, and O Son of Being. Bahá'í prayers are writte...

Religion, Philosophy, Advice

Read More
  • Cover Image

Bible (KJV) 11: 1 Kings

By: King James Version

The history of Israel from the final years of King David's life, through the reign of his son, Solomon, to the rule of King Jehoshaphat of Judah and King Ahaziah of Israel. (Summary by Joy Chan)...

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Life of Jesus Critically Examined, The

By: David Friedrich Strauss

Strauss was an early pioneer in the ongoing 'Quest of the Historical Jesus' movement, and his Life of Jesus is one of the few landmarks in the field. The first edition of Strauss' book was published in Germany in 1835, when he was only 27 years old. He focused his attention on battling two theological fronts which were current at the time - the biblical Literalists who believed the miracles in the Gospels were to be taken as literal history, and the Rationalists, who believed that the Gospel miracles were true but could be explained by natural and rational causes. Strauss rejected both camps and, in a historical analysis of the Gospels that was scrupulous and exhaustive, concluded that our knowledge of the Historical Jesus is hopelessly buried under layers of legend and myth.The price that Strauss paid for publication was high – his book scandalized Europe, and cost him his job as Chair of Theology at the University of Zurich, and ultimately his career. Dozens of books, mostly from Germany, were written in rebuttal. The school of Rationalism died in the 19th century, due in no small part to Strauss' criticism. The school of Literali...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Quest of the Historical Jesus, The

By: Albert Schweitzer

In this book, Schweitzer traces the historical progress of 'Historical Jesus' research, from Hermann Reimarus in the mid 18th century, to William Wrede at the turn of the 20th. Schweitzer showed how Jesus' image had changed with the times and with the personal proclivities of the various authors. He concluded with his own synopsis and interpretation of what had been learned over the course of the previous century. He took the position that the life of Jesus must be interpreted in the light of Jesus' own convictions, which he characterized as those of late Jewish eschatology. (Introduction from Wikipedia, modified by JoeD)...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Quiet Talks about Jesus

By: S. D Gordon

So far as I can find out, I have no theory about Jesus to make these talks fit into. I have tried to find out for myself what the old Book of God tells about Him. And here I am trying to tell to others, as simply as I can, what I found. It was by the tedious, twisting path of doubt that I climbed the hill of truth up to some of its summits of certainty. I am free to confess that I am ignorant of the subject treated here save for the statements of that Book, and for the assent within my own spirit to these statements, which has greatly deepened the impression they made, and make. There is no question raised here about that Book itself, but simply a taking and grouping up together of what it says. ( Summary by Introductory Section )...

Religion, Philosophy, Psychology

Read More
  • Cover Image

Ten Days in the Light of Acca

By: Julia M. Grundy

This work is the story of a pilgrimage made over a hundred years ago by a group of American pilgrims. They were not headed for Canterbury, Rome or Jerusalem. Rather, they were headed for an historical but remote prison-city in a far corner of the Ottoman Empire. ‘Akká (Akko), now a city in Israel which attracts thousands of Bahá’í pilgrims each year, was but little thought of in that early period. It was originally the final place of exile and imprisonment for Bahá’u’lláh, a Persian nobleman who proclaimed that He was the Promised One of all religions and Messenger of God for this day and age. It was also the home of His eldest son, ‘Abbás Effendí, known as ‘Abdu’l-Bahá (Servant of Bahá), or Áqá (the Master), who was the leader of the Bahá’í Faith after Bahá’u’lláh’s passing in 1892. The first Western Bahá’í pilgrims arrived in 1898, which was then followed by a nearly continuous stream of pilgrims that has now grown into a river of devoted followers from all parts of the globe. The Bahá’í Faith was a little known religion in the late 19th and early 20th centuries but has now become widely recognised as the newest of the great world...

Religion, Philosophy, Travel

Read More
  • Cover Image

Three Dialogues between Hylas and Philonous

By: George Berkeley

Berkeley uses Hylas as his primary contemporary philosophical adversary, John Locke. A Hylas is featured in Greek mythology and the name Hylas is derived from an ancient Greek word for matter which Hylas argues for in the dialogues. Philonous translates as lover of mind. In The First Dialogue, Hylas expresses his disdain for skepticism, adding that he has heard Philonous to have maintained the most extravagant opinion... namely, that there is no such thing as material substance in the world. Philonous argues that it is actually Hylas who is the skeptic and that he can prove it. Thus, a philosophical battle of wit begins. (Summary from Wikipedia)...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Wahrheitpfad (Dhammapadam), Der

By: Gautama Buddha

Das Dhammapada ist eine Anthologie von Aussprüchen des Buddha. Dabei sind die Verse so ausgewählt, dass sie den Kern der Lehre des Buddha wiedergeben. Es ist einer der bekanntesten Texte dieser Lehre und findet seine weiteste Verbreitung im südlichen Buddhismus. Dort begleitet es die Schüler des Buddha vom Anfang bis zum Ende ihres Pfades. Darüber hinaus ist es ein Meisterwerk sowohl der frühen buddhistischen Literatur als auch der indischen Tradition des Karvya (Belle Lettre)....

Religion, Ancient Texts, Philosophy, Psychology

Read More
  • Cover Image

Greatest Thing in the World and Other Addresses, The

By: Henry Drummond

The spiritual classic The Greatest Thing In the World is a trenchant and tender analysis of Christian love as set forth in the thirteenth chapter of I Corinthians. The other addresses speak to other aspects of Christian life and thought. (Summary by Pattymarie)...

Religion, Philosophy, Psychology

Read More
  • Cover Image

Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz, The

By: Anonymous

The Chymical Wedding of Christian Rosenkreutz was edited in 1616 in Strasbourg (annexed by France in 1681). It is the third of the original manifestos of the mysterious Fraternity of the Rose Cross (Rosicrucians).NOTE: It was translated into English for the first time in 1690 by E. Foxcroft. This translation became the source for many of the modern attempts to improve the original. The translation presented here is that of E. Foxcroft.Although the book first appeared in 1616, the story takes place over 150 years earlier. It is an allegoric romance (story) divided into Seven Days, or Seven Journeys, like Genesis, and tells us about the way Christian Rosenkreuz was invited to go to a wonderful castle full of miracles, in order to assist the Chymical Wedding of the king and the queen, that is, the husband and the bride. The story begins on an evening near Easter. In the final chapter—the seventh day—CRC is knighted; the year is 1459. It was on Easter-day 1459 that the Constitutions of the Freemasons of Strasburg was first signed in Regensburg, with a second signed shortly afterwards in Strasburg. The Gutenberg Bible be...

Philosophy, Religion, Fiction

Read More
  • Cover Image

Pensées

By: Blaise Pascal

Pascal's Pensées is widely considered to be a masterpiece, and a landmark in French prose. When commenting on one particular section (Thought #72), Sainte-Beuve praised it as the finest pages in the French language. Will Durant, in his 11-volume, comprehensive The Story of Civilization series, hailed it as the most eloquent book in French prose. In Pensées, Pascal surveys several philosophical paradoxes: infinity and nothing, faith and reason, soul and matter, death and life, meaning and vanity—seemingly arriving at no definitive conclusions besides humility, ignorance, and grace. Rolling these into one he develops Pascal's Wager. (Summary from Wikipedia)...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Way of Peace, The

By: James Allen

The Way of Peace is your guide to the power of meditation; self and truth; the acquirement of spiritual power; the realization of selfless love; entering into the infinite; saints, sages, and saviors; the law of service; and the realization of perfect peace. (Summary by Andrea Fiore)...

Instruction, Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Bible (TCNT) NT 01-27: The New Testament

By: Twentieth Century New Testament

Published in 1904, The Twentieth Century New Testament is considered the first translation of the Bible into modern English. It was produced in Britain over a period of 15 years by approximately 20 people -- ministers, housewives, school teachers and businessmen -- who were united by their desire for a New Testament in the language of the people. They were advised by such scholars as J. Rendel Harris and Richard Weymouth so their rendering is quite accurate. In addition they made some effort at rearranging the New Testament books in the order scholars believe they were written -- Mark comes before Matthew, for instance. They also include brief introductions before each book. Though little-known today, the reader will find in The Twentieth Century New Testament a delightful translation that is rewarding both for in-depth study and personal reading. (Summary by Pleonic)...

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Bhagavad Gita

By: Sir Edwin Arnold

The content of the text is a conversation between Krishna and Arjuna taking place on the battlefield of Kurukshetra just prior to the start of a climactic war. Responding to Arjuna's confusion and moral dilemma, Krishna explains to Arjuna his duties as a warrior and Prince and elaborates on a number of different Yogic[7] and Vedantic philosophies, with examples and analogies. This has led to the Gita often being described as a concise guide to Hindu philosophy and also as a practical, self-contained guide to life. During the discourse, Krishna reveals his identity as the Supreme Being Himself (Bhagavan), blessing Arjuna with an awe-inspiring glimpse of His divine absolute form. - Wikipedia...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Vegetarianism and Occultism

By: C. W. Leadbeater

How does occultism regard vegetarianism? It regards it very favorably, and that for many reasons. These reasons may be divided into two classes: those which are ordinary and physical, and those which are occult or hidden. Let us see in detail why a vegetarian diet is emphatically the purest and the best. (Summary from Vegetarianism and Occultism)...

Religion, Science, Philosophy, Advice

Read More
  • Cover Image

God and the State

By: Mikhail Bakunin

Bakunin's most famous work, published in various lengths, this version is the most complete form of the work published hitherto. Originally titled Dieu et l'état, Bakunin intended it to be part of the second portion to a larger work named The Knouto-Germanic Empire and the Social Revolution (Knouto-Germanic Empire is in reference to a treaty betwixt Russia and Germany at the time), but the work was never completed. (from book introduction)...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Book of the Foundations

By: St. Teresa of Avila

Essentially the sequel to The Life of St. Teresa, Teresa recounts the foundations of the Discalced Carmelite monasteries in Spain, both for men and women. This book tells of all the triumphs and troubles, and about the many people who helped her.(Introduction by Ann Boulais)...

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion

By: David Hume

In Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, philosopher David Hume examines whether belief in God can be rational. The work takes the form of a debate between three characters: Cleanthes, who argues that the existence and nature of God can be empirically verified; Demea, who argues that God is completely beyond human knowledge; and Philo, a philosophical skeptic widely thought to represent Hume's own beliefs. Much of the debate centers around Cleanthes' presentation of the analogical argument from design. According to this argument, the complexity and beauty of the universe can only be explained by inferring an intelligent designer, in the same way that one would infer a designer if one came across an intricately complicated machine. Philo presents several objections to this argument, with rejoinders by Cleanthes and occasional interjections by Demea. (Summary by Leon Mire)...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Sadhana : The Realisation of Life, version 2

By: Rabindranath Tagore

A collection of essays on the Hindu/Buddhist view of humankind's place in the universe. As the author says in his introduction: in these papers, it may be hoped, western readers will have an opportunity of coming into touch with the ancient spirit of India as revealed in our sacred texts and manifested in the life of to-day. Most of the essays were given as lectures before Harvard University in 1916 or before. (Summary by Peter Yearsley)...

Philosophy, Religion, Essay/Short nonfiction

Read More
  • Cover Image

All of Grace

By: Charles Spurgeon

HE WHO SPOKE and wrote this message will be greatly disappointed if it does not lead many to the Lord Jesus. It is sent forth in childlike dependence upon the power of God the Holy Ghost, to use it in the conversion of millions, if so He pleases. No doubt many poor men and women will take up this little volume, and the Lord will visit them with grace. To answer this end, the very plainest language has been chosen, and many homely expressions have been used. But if those of wealth and rank should glance at this book, the Holy Ghost can impress them also; since that which can be understood by the unlettered is none the less attractive to the instructed. Oh that some might read it who will become great winners of souls! Who knows how many will find their way to peace by what they read here? A more important question to you, dear reader, is this – Will you be one of them? (From All of Grace)...

Fiction, Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Talks by Abdul Baha Given in Paris

By: ‘Abdu’l-Bahá ‘Abbás

“Much has already been written of the visit of Abdul Baha, Abbas Effendi, to Europe,” writes Lady Blomfield in her Preface to Paris Talks, “During his stay at Paris at 4, Avenue de Comoens, he gave short “Talks” each morning to those who crowded, eager to hear His Teaching. These listeners were of many Nationalities and types of thought, learned and unlearned, members of various religious sects, Theosophists and Agnostics, Materialists and Spiritualists, etc., etc. Abdul Baha spoke in Persian, which was translated into French. Of these “Talks” my two daughters, my friend and I took notes. Many friends asked us to publish these notes in English, but we hesitated. At length when Abdul Baha himself asked us to do so we, of course, consented—in spite of our feeling that our pen is “too weak for such high message.”” Paris Talks is a book transcribed from talks given by `Abdu'l-Bahá, the son and successor of Bahá’u’lláh, the Founder of the Bahá’í Faith, while in Paris. It was originally published as “Talks by `Abdu'l-Bahá Given in Paris” in 1912. `Abdu'l-Bahá did not read and authenticate the transcripts of his talks in Paris, and thus th...

Religion, Instruction, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Soul Food

By: George Douglas Watson

A guide for Christians to walk a godly life. Covering various practical and spiritual topics.

Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Pantheisticon

By: John Toland

Pantheisticon: or, the Form Of Celebrating the Socratic-Society. Divided into Three Parts. Which Contain, I. The Morals and Axioms of the Pantheists; or the Brotherhood. II. Their Deity and Philosophy. III. Their Liberty, and a Law, neither deceiving, nor to be deceived. To which is prefix'd a Discourse upon the Antient and Modern Societies of the Learned, as also upon the Infinite and Eternal Universe. And subjoined, a short dissertation upon a Two-fold Philosophy of the Pantheists, that is to be followed; together with an Idea of the best and most accomplished Man. Written Originally in Latin, by the Ingenious Mr. John Toland. And now, for the first Time, faithfully rendered into English. (Summary from frontispiece.)...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Age of Reason, The

By: Thomas Paine

The Age of Reason: Being an Investigation of True and Fabulous Theology, a deistic treatise written by eighteenth-century British radical and American revolutionary Thomas Paine, critiques institutionalized religion and challenges the inerrancy of the Bible. Published in three parts in 1794, 1795, and 1807, it was a bestseller in America, where it caused a short-lived deistic revival. British audiences, however, fearing increased political radicalism as a result of the French revolution, received it with more hostility. The Age of Reason presents common deistic arguments; for example, it highlights the corruption of the Christian Church and criticizes its efforts to acquire political power. Paine advocates reason in the place of revelation, leading him to reject miracles and to view the Bible as an ordinary piece of literature rather than as a divinely-inspired text. Yet, The Age of Reason is not atheistic: it promotes natural religion and argues for a creator-God....

Politics, Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Union and Communion - or Thoughts on the Song of Solomon

By: J Hudson Taylor

This little book, whose design is to lead the devout Bible student into the Green Pastures of the Good Shepherd, thence to the Banqueting House of the King, and thence to the service of the Vineyard, is one of the abiding legacies of Mr. Hudson Taylor to the Church. In the power of an evident unction from the Holy One, he has been enabled herein to unfold in simplest language the deep truth of the believer's personal union with the Lord, which under symbol and imagery is the subject of The Song of Songs. (From the Foreword by J Stuart Holden)....

Religion, Psychology, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Brilliant Proof (Burhäne Lämé) in reply to an attack upon the Bahai Revelation by Peter Z. Easton, The

By: Mírzá Abu’l-Fadl Gulpáygání

“In these days,” writes the renowned Bahá’í scholar, Mírzá Abu’l-Fadl, “which are the latter days of 1911, A. D. and the early days of 1330 A. H., I have seen a curious article which astonished me. What did I see? I find that one of the missionaries of the Protestant sect, who accounts himself among the learned men of the twentieth century, a helper of the pure religion of Christ and one of the civilized and cultured occidentals, by name, Peter Z. Easton, has been so provoked by jealousy at the universal spread of the heavenly word of His Holiness Abdul-Baha throughout vast expanses of Europe that he has trespassed the limit of courtesy and humanity and published an article replete with execration and calumny in the magazine “Evangelical Christendom.” …Briefly, as this servant [Mírzá Abu’l-Fadl] carefully perused and weighed the above mentioned article, it was found that Peter Z. Easton, in his own supposition, has clung to “four proofs” in opposing the great Bahai Cause. We will therefore mention these four points and show the falsity of his fanciful ideas in each instance.” A number of works were written in the 19th century to def...

Religion, Philosophy, Essay/Short nonfiction

Read More
  • Cover Image

Heretics

By: G. K. Chesterton

The Author Gilbert Keith Chesterton was born in London, England on the 29th of May, 1874. Though he considered himself a mere rollicking journalist, he was actually a prolific and gifted writer in virtually every area of literature. A man of strong opinions and enormously talented at defending them, his exuberant personality nevertheless allowed him to maintain warm friendships with people--such as George Bernard Shaw and H. G. Wells--with whom he vehemently disagreed. Chesterton had no difficulty standing up for what he believed. He was one of the few journalists to oppose the Boer War. His 1922 Eugenics and Other Evils attacked what was at that time the most progressive of all ideas, the idea that the human race could and should breed a superior version of itself. In the Nazi experience, history demonstrated the wisdom of his once reactionary views.Chesterton wrote several works of Christian apologetics, the best known of which are Othodoxy, Heretics, and The Everlasting Man. (Summary from Project Gutenberg)...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Greek View of Life, The

By: Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson

“With the Greek civilisation beauty perished from the world. Never again has it been possible for man to believe that harmony is in fact the truth of all existence.” This elegantly-written work provides a splendid introduction to the Greeks of the classic period: how they thought, wrote, and organised their lives and loves. Although it dates from the 1890s, there is very little about it that has dated. To its author’s credit, the subject of “Greek love” is dealt with in a sane and factual context - despite the judicial assassination of Oscar Wilde going on in the background. A Cambridge don much admired by his students (including E. M. Forster), Goldsworthy Lowes Dickinson belonged to the Apostles, a secret society with a strong ethic of male friendship. Alfred Tennyson and his beloved Arthur Hallam were early members. Dickinson is chiefly remembered as a historian and pacifist who played a significant part in the founding of the League of Nations. Inevitably, given his interests and intellectual background, he became a close associate of the Bloomsbury Group. The Greek View of Life is no dry academic tome. It is a popularizing work...

Essay/Short nonfiction, Religion, Politics, Philosophy, Art

Read More
  • Cover Image

Dawn of a To-morrow, The

By: Frances Hodgson Burnett

A wealthy London business man takes a room in a poor part of the city. He is depressed and has decided to take his life by going the next day to purchase a hand gun he had seen in a pawnshop window. The morning comes with one of those 'memorable fogs' and the adventure he has in it alters his decisions and ultimately his life. (Summary by Linda Andrus)...

Fiction, Religion, Philosophy

Read More
  • Cover Image

Soren Kierkegaard, Various Readings

By: Various

The writings listed here represent books about Soren Kierkegaard. A fragment of his work, On the Dedication to That Single Individual, has made it to the public domain. Who was Soren Kierkegaard? He was a Danish philosopher and religious author; b. Copenhagen May 6, 1813; d. there Nov. 11, 1855. His father, Michael, a clothing merchant, once cursed God when he was young. This one incident caused him so much distress that it affected him with a deep melancholy, which he transferred to poor Soren. Michael was an evil man. He tricked Soren into thinking that the whole world existed in his own living room by taking him for imaginary walks about the neighborhood, or anywhere Soren wanted to go, as long as it existed in his imagination only. Later in life, when Soren was on his own, he rarely left Copenhagen, but he did walk about the streets and greet passersby, discussing events of the day. After 6 years of “splendid inactivity” he obtained his degree in Theology from the University of Copenhagen with the submission of his thesis paper in 1841, On the Concept of Irony with Continual Reference to Socrates. Just before graduation he fell ...

Philosophy, Religion

Read More
  • Cover Image

Bethink Yourselves!

By: Leo Tolstoy

As Russia goes to war against Japan, Tolstoy urges those at all levels of society, from the Tsar down to the common soldier, to consider their actions in the light of Christ's teaching. However strange this may appear, the most effective and certain deliverance of men from all the calamities which they inflict upon themselves and from the most dreadful of all—war—is attainable, not by any external general measures, but merely by that simple appeal to the consciousness of each separate man which, nineteen hundred years ago, was proposed by Jesus—that every man bethink himself, and ask himself, who is he, why he lives, and what he should and should not do. (Introduction by David Barnes, and extract from Chapter VI)...

Instruction, Religion, Philosophy, Politics

Read More
  • Cover Image

Year Amongst the Persians, A

By: Edward Granville Browne

Edward Granville Browne (1862 – 1926), born in Stouts Hill, Uley, Gloucestershire, England, was a British orientalist who published numerous articles and books of academic value, mainly in the areas of history and literature. His works are respected for their scholarship, uniqueness, and style. He published in areas which few other Western scholars had explored to any sufficient degree. He used a language and style that showed high respect for everybody, even toward those he personally did not view in positive light. In A Year Amongst the Persians (1893) he wrote a sympathetic portrayal of a Persian society which few Westerners had ever seen, including a frank account of the effects of opium. It did not attract the attention it deserved at the time of its initial publication, but after his death in 1926 it was reprinted and became a classic in English travel literature. A Year Amongst the Persians includes moving accounts of the Bahá’í community in Iran. Concerning his meetings with the Bahá’ís of Iran, Browne writes: “The memory of those assemblies can never fade from my mind; the recollection of those faces and those tones no time...

Travel, Religion, Philosophy

Read More
       
1
|
2
|
3
Records: 1 - 20 of 44 - Pages: 
 
 





Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.