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British Museum Guide to the Exhibited Manuscripts : Illuminated Manuscripts and Bindings of Manuscipts Exhibited in the Grenville Library : Part III

By: Julius P. Gilson
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Corpus of a Siam Mosquito

By: Steven David Justin Sills

...." "Why don't they have kings now?" "Well, Canadians do have the British monarchy. Canada is a commonwealth." He didn't go further bec... ...y had seen of the kings' ancient boats that were housed in the Royal Barge Museum. The night and its dark appetites were mature in full ins... ...ng now intimacy?" she spoke with a bit of anger. "Isn' t going to an art museum even a higher intimacy? Isn't being an artist or in my case sharing... ...inception of their friendship, they had attended the natural science freak museum at Siriaj Hospital. In Thailand no one told the truth. They were c... ... of those restaurants. Instead, he was supposed to meet her in front of a museum. He meandered in different pathways throughout many buildings until ... ... buildings until he noticed her sitting on a stoop under a sign that said "Museum" in English. Her hair was shorter than the last time he saw her and...

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In the Eye of the Beholder

By: By Sharon E. Cathcart

...ned possible. I tried to keep a normal life, going to cafes, galleries and museums; always, I imagined Erik there with me. Zareh and Antoinette vis... ... him handsomely to do it. So, it is he who goes with you to the cafes, 78 museums, gardens and market. It is he with whom you discuss books and en... ...times. Some days, Gilbert would persuade me to go on an outing with him; the British Museum was a particular favorite. On those occasions, I could f... ...ome days, Gilbert would persuade me to go on an outing with him; the British Museum was a particular favorite. On those occasions, I could forget my... ...y when I felt up to activity, it snowed in London. I had planned to visit a museum, but Gilbert had a different idea. “There is a frozen pond at the... ...iding one of the horses. Sometimes Erik insisted that Gilbert take me to a museum so that I would get out of the house for a while and he could wor...

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The Hitler File : A Novel of Fact

By: Sam Vaknin

... all the way to Jerusalem and, standing on the grounds of Yad Vashem, the Holocaust Museum, she taped the piercing sound and the ensuing silence. ... ...-supporting Jews.” He paused, as if for emphasis: “No one wanted the Jews. The British sealed off Palestine. The Americans imposed immigration ... ... Business Week predicted ‘a steady decline of jingoistic action against the Jews’. British political commentators concurred: ‘Herr Hitler has not in... ...d essentially the same job: Josh was a research librarian at the Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington DC. The Genocide Monitoring Group and the M... ... with more than a modicum of trepidation that I decided to pay him a visit. The Museum was the only exhibition space I knew that intentionally i... ... tried everything. We sent couriers with peace offers to both the Americans and the British. We released prisoners from concentration camps. We prom... ...ced moles everywhere: the OSS, later the CIA, not to mention the Communist-infested British MI6. It looked hopeless until someone came with the idea...

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Words to Wright By

By: Robin Bayne

...face. Therefore, whether I find craftsmanship and beauty in libraries or art museums, engagements with pen or with brush, there are writing techniques... ... a book is to be measured by what you can carry away from it. ~ James Bryce (British Historian) “For though I be free from all men, yet have I made my...

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Class Heroes: A Class Apart

By: Stephen Henning

... London. They had been on a day trip to St Paul’s Cathedral and the Imperial War Museum. There were shrieks, giggles, mobile ringtones, and competi... .... Anika was tearing out sheets of paper from another girl’s set of Imperial War Museum worksheets, screwing them up, and handing them to Emma. Emma... ... it might have had when it was new had long since been tarnished by time and the British weather. PC O’Brien of the Metropolitan Police trudged up a... ...poken to any of them so far because I have been too upset, I may decide that the British public, and people around the world, have a right to know h... ...p if we had him treated in the US by the very best doctors. 53 That way the British police would have no jurisdiction anyway. We’d pick up the ...

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And Gulliver Returns Book IV : A Look at Our Human Values

By: Lemuel Gulliver XVI

...ical document whose aim was to incite the colonists to revolt against the British.‖ --―I don‘t buy that Lee. We have always been a primarily Ch... ...s? ` ―I don‘t know any of the particulars of these studies, but the British Broadcasting Company in 2004 found that 10% of Americans didn‘t be... ...e Soviet Union with a youth hostel group. Some in the group knew about the Museum of Religion and Atheism. The Intourist guide said it didn‘t exist, ... ...ttempt to prove that atheism was true. He said that when they entered the museum they first saw pictures of primitives worshiping gods in volcanoes ... ... ―I went to Leningrad and Moscow in the mid-80s to look for the museum. All of the exhibits on atheism had been removed. And I understand ... ...equired by other governmental agencies. Cut culture—the orchestras, zoos, museums. But keep the limos for the city council members. Just cut health... .... Were all German soldiers anti-Semitic? Was Churchill the genius that the British say he was? Did Roosevelt really know that the Japanese were going... ...Airlines is safer than flying on a transatlantic flight of an American or British airliner because of the terrorist threats? ―If the presi... ...have just enumerated are not mine alone. Roger Bacon, the 13 th . Century British philosopher said ‗There are four chief obstacles in grasping truth ...

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And Gulliver Returns Book III : A Visit to Kino

By: Bob Oconnor

.... The richest man in the UK picks up about a half million dollars from the British tax payers while Ted Turner and David Rockefeller are also report... ...ese or the realities of the ill-conceived war in Iraq for the Americans and British—it doesn‟t take long for the truth to be known. The ruling group ... ...g brought to us in the 7 th and 8 th centuries by the Arabs, then by the British in the 18 th Century, there has been a long history 16 of opi... ...nment has always fought bitterly against it. We lost the opium wars to the British so were forced to allow opium imports. Under the Communists drug u... ... West to immigrate. German engineers, American doctors and physicists, and British bankers were among those who were welcomed by the power elite of K... ...his is done by e-mail and in our newspapers. We also keep them informed of museum exhibits, theater performances, athletic events, youth athletic lea...

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Listen with Your Heart

By: Barbara Scott

... mobs that stoned the Opera House to protest the New York appearance of the British tragedian, William Charles Macready. It was a senseless exercise... ...h tragedian, William Charles Macready. It was a senseless exercise in anti- British hatred that resulted in more than twenty deaths, not counting Jim... ...g green leaves and yellow cabbage roses as big as dinner plates. “And the British subjugated the world for tea,” she said. “Exactly so.” He sele... ... He opened a bottle of Irish whisky and filled a glass with it. “I am not British. An Irishman’s veins require stronger fluid than tea.” Ther... ... been pullin’ in such huge audiences for Barnum’s Minstrels at the American Museum, Christy never would have hired me to compete with him. Needless ...

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The American

By: Henry James

... divan which at that period occupied the centre of the Salon Carre, in the Museum of the Louvre. This com- modious ottoman has since been removed, to ... ...dge of English, and his accent was oddly tinged with the cockneyism of the British metropolis. But his learning had grown rusty with disuse, and his v... ...78 The American glish without an accent, or rather with that distinctively British accent which, on his arrival in Europe, had struck Newman as an alt... ... Bellegarde looked hard at him, and returned his hand-shake with a sort of British positiveness which reminded him that she was the daughter of the Ea... ... whiskers were fair and glossy, and he had a large dimple, of unmistakably British origin, in the middle of his handsome chin. He was “distinguished” ... ...the progress of the young lady herself. He went one afternoon to the great museum, and wandered through several of the rooms in fruitless quest of her... ...very now and then, having learned from Newman that he had been through the museums of Europe, he uttered some pol- ished aphorism upon the flesh-tints... ... been a sufficient assurance that she was not a Frenchwoman; a cap of pure British compo- sition. She had a pale, decent, depressed-looking face, and ...

...the year 1868, a gentle man was reclining at his ease on the great circular divan which at that period occupied the centre of the Salon Carre, in the Museum of the Louvre. This commodious ottoman has since been removed, to the extreme regret of all weak-kneed lovers of the fine arts, but the gentleman in question had taken serene possession of its softest spot, and, with h...

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He Sat, In Defiance of Municipal Orders

By: Rudyard Kipling

...osite the old Ajaib Gher the Wonder House, as the natives call the Lahore Museum. Who hold Zam Zammah, that ‘fire breathing dragon’, hold the Punjab,... ... a great piece of magic–such magic as men practised over yonder behind the Museum, in the big blue and white Jadoo Gher–the Magic House, as we name th... ...e a rude remark to the native policeman on guard over rows of shoes at the Museum door. The big Punjabi grinned toler antly: he knew Kim of old. So d... ...r on the dry road from his goat skin bag. So did Jawahir 6 Kim Singh, the Museum carpenter, bent over new packing cases. So did everybody in sight ex... ...orthern Power that there was a leakage of news from their territories into British India. So those Kings’ Prime Ministers were seriously annoyed and t... ... of a royal house who had been brought to book for kidnapping women within British territory. The Moslem Archbishop had been emphatic and over arrogan... ...ial faceelities by the Government. Of course, we always do that. It is our British pride.’ ‘Then what is to fear from them?’ ‘By Jove, they are not bl... ...raid that in his drunken ness he might have been indiscreet. He loved the British Gov ernment–it was the source of all prosperity and honour, and hi... ...rders of Nahan, where the Rahah of that State mistook them for de serting British soldiery. Hurree Babu explained the greatness and glory, in their o...

...e of municipal orders, astride the gun Zam Zammah on her brick platform opposite the old Ajaib-Gher -the Wonder House, as the natives call the Lahore Museum. Who hold Zam-Zammah, that ?fire-breathing dragon?, hold the Punjab, for the great green-bronze piece is always first of the conqueror?s loot....

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Sunday under Three Heads

By: Charles Dickens

...ir generation, advance precisely the same description of argu ments. In the British Museum, there is a curious pamphlet got up by the Agnews of Charl... ...ation, advance precisely the same description of argu ments. In the British Museum, there is a curious pamphlet got up by the Agnews of Charles’s tim... ...ng which will amuse them, and hurt nobody else. The propriety of opening the British Museum to respect able people on Sunday, has lately been the sub... ... will amuse them, and hurt nobody else. The propriety of opening the British Museum to respect able people on Sunday, has lately been the subject of ... ...ators to assign any valid reason for opposing so sensible a proposition. The Museum contains rich specimens from all the vast museums and repositories... ...e employed upon the Sabbath. They certainly would; but how many? Why, if the British Museum, and the National Gallery, and the Gallery of Practical Sc... ...ed upon the Sabbath. They certainly would; but how many? Why, if the British Museum, and the National Gallery, and the Gallery of Practical Science, a... ...ow different a picture would the streets and public places then present! The museums, and repositories of scientific and useful inventions, would be c...

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What Is Coming a Forecast of Things after the War

By: H. G. Wells

... prelude. The prophetic type will steadfastly refuse to see the world as a museum; it will insist that here is a stage set for a drama that perpetuall... ...gle) the greatness of the power of Russia, which was still in those days a British bogey; in making Belgium the battle-ground in a coming struggle bet... ...uld find in the divines and dignitaries of the Vatican, of the Russian and British official churches, or of any other of the multitudinous Christian s... ...ge, dream- ing of a renewal of the struggle, it becomes impossible for the British, the French, the Belgians, Russians, Italians or Japanese to think ... ...vely , to hold together and maintain any institution for co-operation. The British Press may be too silly not to foster irritation and sus- picion; we... ...onism on a larger scale trading on the resuscitation of dying hatreds; the British and Russian diplomatists may play annoying tricks upon one another ... ...r Gothic cathe- drals for us. They put our dearest racial possessions into museums and admire them very much indeed. They teach our young men to fly k...

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A Little Tour in France

By: Henry James

...f Balzac at Tours; there is only, in one of the chambers of the melancholy museum, a rather clever, coarse bust. The description in “La Grenadiere,” o... ...ttle suggestion, in the untended aspect of walk and lawns, of the vigilant British gardener. The manor of Azay, as seen to-day, dates from the early p... ...nder the mirror behind the comptoir, was a much more civilized spot than a British public-house, or a “commercial room,” with pipes and whiskey, or ev... ...me to go to the Musee; the more so that I have a weakness for pro- vincial museums,—a sentiment that depends but little on the quality of the collecti... ...cap, who pulls aside a faded curtain to show you the lustreless gem of the museum,—these things have a mild historical qual- ity, and the sallow canva... ...d the sallow canvases after all illustrate something. Many of those in the museum of Nantes illustrate the taste of a successful warrior; having been ... ...s of Montpellier. Long before Mentone was discovered or Colorado invented, British invalids travelled down through France in the post-chaise or the pu... ...f no less a person than Charles Edward Stuart, the second pretender to the British crown. Surely no woman ever was associated sentimentally with three... ...ous Albion that they order this matter best! How many a time did the eager British mercenary, clad in vel- veteen and clinging to the door of the carr...

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20, 000 Leagues under the Sea

By: Jules Verne

...in the United States. In virtue of my office as Assistant Professor in the Museum of Natural History in Paris, the French Government had attached me t... ...ch they had pierced through and through, as a gimlet pierces a barrel. The Museum of the Faculty of Medicine of Paris possesses one of these defensive... ... follows: 12 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea To M. Aronnax, Professor in the Museum of Paris, Fifth Avenue Hotel, New York. Sir,—If you will consent to ... ...nd I will not bring back less than half a yard of his ivory halberd to the Museum of Natural His- tory.” But in the meanwhile I must seek this narwhal... ...six months ago.” “In your little room, sir,” replied Conseil, “and in your museum, sir; and I should have already classed all your fossils, sir. And t... ...an hour. But I saw noth- ing, not even the Island of Perim, with which the British Government has fortified the position of Aden. There were too many ... ...s Verne than 120 miles from Ireland. Was Captain Nemo going to land on the British Isles? No. To my great surprise he made for the south, once more co...

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War and the Future; Italy, France and Britain at War

By: H. G. Wells

...ist- ence for making things clear, counteracting hostile sugges- tion, the British official organisations are comparatively in- effective; but what is... ...btle critic, calling in upon me after brav- ing the wintry seas to see the British fleet; M. Joseph Reinach follows them presently upon the same erran... ...nyone who from the perspective of Italy may seem to be a representative of British opinion. If Herbert Spencer had been alive General Radcliffe would ... ...en objects, bits of shell, cartridge clips, hel- mets; it is a peripatetic museum. It is as if he hoped for a clue. It is almost impossible, I have fo... ...p the weapon. I carry my pacifism far beyond the ambiguous little group of British and foreign sentimentalists who pretend so amusingly to be socialis... ...that preceded the war. The reckless and beautiful zeal of the women in the British and French munition factories, for example, the gaiety and fearless...

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A Modern Utopia

By: H. G. Wells

...vidualities, and Plato turned his back on truth when he turned towards his museum of spe- cific ideals. Heraclitus, that lost and misinterpreted giant... ...; the lighter minded may read and mark the temper of Professor Case in the British Encyclopaedia, article Logic (Vol. XXX.). I have appended to his bo... ...on. T o us, clad as we are in mountain-soiled tweeds and with no money but British bank- notes negotiable only at a practically infinite distance, thi... ...f labour. This most excellent idea does, as a matter of fact, underlie the British institution of the work- house, but it is jumbled up with the relie... ...of begging. 94 A Modern Utopia There will need to be, in the place of the British casual wards, simple but comfortable inns with a low tariff—con- tr... ... of the Touring Club de France, my green ticket to the Reading Room of the British Museum, and my Lettre d’Indication from the London and County Bank.... ...Touring Club de France, my green ticket to the Reading Room of the British Museum, and my Lettre d’Indication from the London and County Bank. A fooli... ...offer the card of the T .C.F . I follow up that blow with my green British Museum ticket, as tattered as a flag in a knight’s chapel. “You’ll get foun... ...rld of to-day, or the cataloguing of such libraries as that of the British Museum, or such collections as that of the insects in Cromwell Road. Such a...

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Sartor Resartus: The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

...tional, or any other of those patriotic Libraries, at present the glory of British Literature;” might work revolutions in Thought; and so forth;—in co... ...uch title and vocation, it were perhaps uninteresting to say more. Let the British reader study and enjoy, in simplicity of heart, what is here presen... ... us to that joint-stock ve- hicle of publication, “at present the glory of British Lit- erature”? If so, the Library Editors are welcome to dig in it ... ...ooden Dibble fashioned by man, and those Liverpool Steam-carriages, or the British House of Com- mons, we shall note what progress he has made. He dig... ...le Editor, or Combination of Able Edi- tors, gains the world’s ear. Of the British Newspaper Press, perhaps the most important of all, and wonderful e... ... see it our duty ultimately to deposit these Six Paper-Bags in the British Museum, farther description, and all vituperation of them, may be spared. B... ...ts with care: when did we see any injected Preparation of the Dandy in our Museums; any specimen of him preserved in spirits! Lord Herringbone may dre...

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The Whole History of Grandfathers Chair or True Stories from New England History, 1620-1808

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

...ss caused the gover nor and Sir Francis Wheeler, who was commander of the British forces, to give up all thoughts of attacking Canada. “Soon after th... ...r’s younger days there used to be a wax figure of him in one of the Boston museums, representing a solemn, dark visaged person, in a minister’s black ... ... a mob of the Boston people. They were so in censed at the conduct of the British Commodore Knowles, who had impressed some of their fellow citizens,... ...s of Acadia ever reached the ears of Louis XV . The exiles grew old in the British prov inces, and never saw Acadia again. Their descendants remain a... ...nt times; but not one of them had won a single important tri umph for the British arms. This ill success was not owing to the want of means: for, in ... ...in 1759, Sir Jeffrey Amherst was appointed com mander in chief of all the British forces in America. He was a man of ability and a skilful soldier. A...

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The New Machiavelli

By: H. G. Wells

...as a Sowerby’s Botany also, with thousands of carefully tinted pictures of British plants, and one or two other important works in the sitting-room. I... ...orant and wretched and the under-equipped and under-staffed Na- tional and British schools, supported by voluntary contribu- tions and sectarian rival... ...still hard at it, and Heaven frightfully upset about the Sunday opening of museums and the falling birth-rate, and as touchy and vindictive as ever. T... ... excursion to Margate and back; we explored London docks and Bethnal Green Museum, Petticoat Lane and all sorts of out-of-the-way places together. We ... ... social phenomenon, the German official, so differ- ent in manner from the British; and when one woke again after that one had come to Bale, and out o... ...“Things are being done?” “Oh!—no doubt of it. It’s one of the parts of the British machinery—that doesn’t show… . But nobody else could do it. “Two pe... ...ndow. She linked with that the fact that Bailey had a mind as orderly as a museum, and an invincible power over detail. She saw that if two people too... ...Baileys’ one extravagance, they loved to think of searches going on in the British Museum, and letters being cleared up and precis made overhead, whil... ... one extravagance, they loved to think of searches going on in the British Museum, and letters being cleared up and precis made overhead, while they s...

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