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The Book of Nehemiah

By: Anonymous

Excerpt: The Book of Nehemiah, the Sixteenth Book of the King James Version of the Bible.

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The Divine Comedy Volume 2 Purgatory [Purgatorio]

By: Dante Aligheri

Excerpt: The Divine Comedy, Volume Two, Purgatory [Purgatorio] by Dante Aligheri, trans Charles Eliot Norton.

Contents PURGATORY................................................................... 6 CANTO I. Invocation to the Muses.?Dawn of Easter on the shore of Purgatory.?The Four Stars.?Cato.?The cleansing of Dante from the stains of Hell. ............................................................................................................ 6 CANTO II. Sunrise.?The Poets on the shore.?Coming of a boat, guided by an angel, bearing souls to Purgatory.? Their landing.?Casella and his song.?Cato hurries the souls to the mountain. ................................. 10 CANTO III. Ante-Purgatory.?Souls of those who have died in contumacy of the Church.? Manfred. ............. 13 CANTO IV. Ante-Purgatory.?Ascent to a shelf of the mountain.?The negligent, who postponed repentance to the last hour.?Belacqua. ..................................................................................................................................... 16 CANTO V. Ante-Purgatory.?Spirits who had delayed repentance, and met with death by violence, but died repentant.?Jacopo del Cassero.?Buonconte da Montefeltro?Via de? Tolomei. ................................

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The Enormous Room

By: E. E. Cummings

Introduction: ?For this my son was dead, and is alive again; he was lost; and is found.? He was lost by the Norton-Harjes Ambulance Corps. He was officially dead as a result of official misinformation....

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A Treatise on Good Works Together with the Letter of Dedication

By: Dr. Martin Luther

Introduction: 1. The Occasion of the Work. -- Luther did not impose himself as reformer upon the Church. In the course of a conscientious performance of the duties of his office, to which he had been regularly and divinely called, and without any urging on his part, he attained to this position by inward necessity. In 1515 he received his appointment as the standing substitute for the sickly city pastor, Simon Heinse, from the city council of Wittenberg. Before this time he was obliged to preach only occasionally in the convent, apart from his activity as teacher in the University and convent. Through this appointment he was in duty bound, by divine and human right, to lead and direct the congregation at Wittenberg on the true way to life, and it would have been a denial of the knowledge of salvation which God had led him to acquire, by way of ardent inner struggles, if he had led the congregation on any other way than the one God had revealed to him in His Word. He could not deny before the congregation which had been intrusted to his care, what up to this time he had taught with ever increasing clearness in his lectures at the Uni...

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Salammbo

By: Gustave Flaubert

Excerpt: Salammbo by Gustave Flaubert.

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Travels in England during the Reign of Queen Elizabeth

By: Paul Hentzner

Introduction: Queen Elizabeth herself, and London as it was in her time, with sketches of Elizabethan England, and of its great men in the way of social dignity, are here brought home to us by Paul Hentzner and Sir Robert Naunton....

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Ana Karenina

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Excerpt: Chapter 1. The Karenins, husband and wife, continued living in the same house, met every day, but were complete strangers to one another. Alexey Alexandrovitch made it a rule to see his wife every day, so that the servants might have no grounds for suppositions, but avoided dining at home. Vronsky was never at Alexey Alexandrovitch?s house, but Anna saw him away from home, and her husband was aware of it....

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Ferragus Chief of the Devorants

By: Honoré de Balzac

Preface: Thirteen men were banded together in Paris under the Empire, all imbued with one and the same sentiment, all gifted with sufficient energy to be faithful to the same thought, with sufficient honor among themselves never to betray one another even if their interests clashed; and sufficiently wily and politic to conceal the sacred ties that united them, sufficiently strong to maintain themselves above the law, bold enough to undertake all things, and fortunate enough to succeed, nearly always, in their undertakings; having run the greatest dangers, but keeping silence if defeated; inaccessible to fear; trembling neither before princes, nor executioners, not even before innocence; accepting each other for such as they were, without social prejudices,--criminals, no doubt, but certainly remarkable through certain of the qualities that make great men, and recruiting their number only among men of mark....

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Taras Bulba and Other Tales

By: Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol

Excerpt: Taras Bulba and Other Tales by Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol.

Contents INTRODUCTION ............................................................ 4 TARAS BULBA.............................................................. 13 ST. JOHN?S EVE ......................................................... 130 THE CLOAK ................................................................ 146 HOW THE TWO IVANS QUARRELLED .................. 176 THE MYSTERIOUS PORTRAIT ................................ 223 THE CALASH .............................................................. 270...

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Wilhelm Tell

By: Johann Christoph Friedrich Von Schiller

Excerpt: Wilhelm Tell by Johann Christoph Freidrich von Schiller, translated by Theodore Martin.

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Confidence

By: Henry James

Excerpt: Chapter 1. It was in the early days of April; Bernard Longueville had been spending the winter in Rome. He had travelled northward with the consciousness of several social duties that appealed to him from the further side of the Alps, but he was under the charm of the Italian spring, and he made a pretext for lingering....

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Preface to Major Barbara First Aid to Critics

By: George Bernard Shaw

Excerpt: Preface to Major Barbara: First Aid to Critics by George Bernard Shaw.

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The Divine Comedy Volume 1 Hell

By: Dante Aligheri

Excerpt: The Divine Comedy, Volume One, Hell [The Inferno] by Dante Aligheri, trans Charles Eliot Norton.

Contents INTRODUCTION .................................................................................................................7 AIDS TO THE STUDY OF THE DIVINE COMEDY .......................................................... 14 HELL .............................................................................. 16 CANTO I. Dante, astray in a wood, reaches the foot of a hill which he begins to ascend; he is hindered by three beasts; he turns back and is met by Virgil, who proposes to guide him into the eternal world. ....................................... 16 CANTO II. Dante, doubtful of his own powers, is discouraged at the outset.?Virgil cheers him by telling him that he has been sent to his aid by a blessed Spirit from Heaven.?Dante casts off fear, and the poets proceed. ................ 19 CANTO III. The gate of Hell.?Virgil lends Dante in.?The punishment of the neither good nor bad.?Aeheron, and the sinners on its bank.?Charon.?Earthquake.?Dante swoons. ................................................................. 22 CANTO IV. The further side of Acheron.?Virgil leads Dante into Limbo, the First Circle of Hell, cont...

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Ghosts a Domestic Tragedy in Three Acts

By: Henrik Ibsen

Excerpt: ACT I. (SCENE.--A large room looking upon a garden door in the left-hand wall, and two in the right. In the middle of the room, a round table with chairs set about it, and books, magazines and newspapers upon it. In the foreground on the left, a window, by which is a small sofa with a work-table in front of it. At the back the room opens into a conservatory rather smaller than the room. From the right-hand side of this, a door leads to the garden. Through the large panes of glass that form the outer wall of the conservatory, a gloomy fjord landscape can be discerned, half-obscured by steady rain....

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Leaves of Grass

By: Walt Whitman

Excerpt: BOOK I. INSCRIPTIONS. One?s-self I sing, a simple separate person, Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-Masse. Of physiology from top to toe I sing, Not physiognomy alone nor brain alone is worthy for the Muse, I say the Form complete is worthier far, The Female equally with the Male I sing. Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power, Cheerful, for freest action form?d under the laws divine, The Modern Man I sing....

Contents LEAVES OF GRASS.......................8 BOOK I. INSCRIPTIONS..................9 One?s-Self I Sing...................................9 As I Ponder?d in Silence.....................10 In Cabin?d Ships at Sea.......................11 To Foreign Lands................................12 To a Historian.....................................12 To Thee Old Cause..............................13 Eidolons................................................14 For Him I Sing....................................18 When I Read the Book........................18 Beginning My Studies.........................18 Beginners............................................19 To the States.......................................19 On Journeys Through the States..........19 To a Certain Cantatrice.......................20 Me Imperturbe....................................20 Savantism..............................................21 The Ship Starting................................21 I Hear America Singing......................21 What Place Is Besieged?......................22 Still Though the One I Sing................22 Shut Not Your Doors..........................

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Our Mutual Friend

By: Charles Dickens

Excerpt: It was a foggy day in London, and the fog was heavy and dark. Animate London, with smarting eyes and irritated lungs, was blinking, wheezing, and choking; inanimate London was a sooty spectre, divided in purpose between being visible and invisible, and so being wholly neither. Gaslights flared in the shops with a haggard and unblest air, as knowing themselves to be night-creatures that had no business abroad under the sun; while the sun itself when it was for a few moments dimly indicated through circling eddies of fog, showed as if it had gone out and were collapsing flat and cold....

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The Magic Skin

By: Honoré de Balzac

Excerpt: The talisman towards the end of the month of October 1829 a young man entered the Palais-Royal just as the gaming-houses opened, agreeably to the law which protects a passion by its very nature easily excisable. He mounted the staircase of one of the gambling hells distinguished by the number 36, without too much deliberation. ?Your hat, sir, if you please?? a thin, querulous voice called out. A little old man, crouching in the darkness behind a railing, suddenly rose and exhibited his features, carved after a mean design....

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Overruled

By: George Bernard Shaw

Excerpt: Overruled by George Bernard Shaw.

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Princess Shtcherbatskaya Considered That It Was Out of the Question for the Wedding to Take Place before Lent

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Excerpt: Chapter 1. Princess Shtcherbatskaya considered that it was out of the question for the wedding to take place before Lent, just five weeks off, since not half the trousseau could possibly be ready by that time. But she could not but agree with Levin that to fix it for after Lent would be putting it off too late, as an old aunt of Prince Shtcherbatsky?s was seriously ill and might die, and then the mourning would delay the wedding still longer. And therefore, deciding to divide the trousseau into two parts--a larger and smaller trousseau--the princess consented to have the wedding before Lent. She determined that she would get the smaller part of the trousseau all ready now, and the larger part should be made later, and she was much vexed with Levin because he was incapable of giving her a serious answer to the question whether he agreed to this arrangement or not. The arrangement was the more suitable as, immediately after the wedding, the young people were to go to the country, where the more important part of the trousseau would not be wanted....

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The Shewing-Up of Blanco Posnet

By: George Bernard Shaw

Excerpt: This little play is really a religious tract in dramatic form. If our silly censorship would permit its performance, it might possibly help to set right-side-up the perverted conscience and re-invigorate the starved self-respect of our considerable class of loose-lived playgoers whose point of honor is to deride all official and conventional sermons....

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Democracy and Education

By: John Dewey

Excerpt: Renewal of Life by Transmission. The most notable distinction between living and inanimate things is that the former maintain themselves by renewal. A stone when struck resists. If its resistance is greater than the force of the blow struck, it remains outwardly unchanged. Otherwise, it is shattered into smaller bits. Never does the stone attempt to react in such a way that it may maintain itself against the blow, much less so as to render the blow a contributing factor to its own continued action....

Contents Chapter One: Education as a Necessity of Life .............................................................................. 5 Chapter Two: Education as a Social Function .............................................................................. 14 Chapter Three: Education as Direction ........................................................................................ 28 Chapter Four: Education as Growth ............................................................................................. 46 Chapter Five: Preparation, Unfolding, and Formal Discipline................................................... 58 Chapter Six: Education as Conservative and Progressive ........................................................... 74 Chapter Seven: The Democratic Conception in Education ......................................................... 85 Chapter Eight: Aims in Education .............................................................................................. 105 Chapter Nine: Natural Development and Social Efficiency as Aims.........................................116 Chapter Ten: Interest and Discipline ......

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War and Peace

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Excerpt: War and Peace: Book Thirteen by Leo Tolstoy.

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Letters on England

By: Voltaire, 1694-1778

Introduction: Francois Marie Arouet, who called himself Voltaire, was the son of Francois Arouet of Poitou, who lived in Paris, had given up his office of notary two years before the birth of this his third son, and obtained some years afterwards a treasurer?s office in the Chambre des Comptes. Voltaire was born in the year 1694. He lived until within ten or eleven years of the outbreak of the Great French Revolution, and was a chief leader in the movement of thought that preceded the Revolution. Though he lived to his eighty-fourth year, Voltaire was born with a weak body....

Contents LETTER I.?ON THE QUAKERS .............................................................................................................................. 6 LETTER II.?ON THE QUAKERS .......................................................................................................................... 10 LETTER III.?ON THE QUAKERS ......................................................................................................................... 12 LETTER IV.?ON THE QUAKERS......................................................................................................................... 16 LETTER V.?ON THE CHURCH OF ENGLAND .................................................................................................. 20 LETTER VI.?ON THE PRESBYTERIANS............................................................................................................ 23 LETTER VII.?ON THE SOCINIANS, OR ARIANS, OR ANTITRINITARIANS ............................................. 24 LETTER VIII.?ON THE PARLIAMENT ............................................................................................................... ...

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