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Succotash

Loose kernels of sweet corn
A succotash prepared with kidney beans.

Succotash (from Narragansett sohquttahhash, "broken corn kernels"[1]) is a food dish consisting primarily of sweet corn with lima beans or other shell beans. Other ingredients may be added including tomatoes and green or sweet red peppers.[2] Combining a grain with a legume provides a dish that is high in all essential amino acids.[3][4] Because of the relatively inexpensive and more readily available ingredients, the dish was popular during the Great Depression in the United States. It was sometimes cooked in a casserole form, often with a light pie crust on top as in a traditional pot pie. Succotash is a traditional dish of many Thanksgiving celebrations in New England[5] as well as in Pennsylvania and other states. In some parts of the American South, any mixture of vegetables prepared with lima beans and topped with lard or butter is called succotash. The Native Americans of the northeastern woodlands were the first to prepare the dish.

Cultural references

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^ Livestrong.com webpage entitled NUTRITIONAL SOURCES OF ESSENTIAL AMINO ACIDS
  4. ^ http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/organic/essam.html
  5. ^ Morgan, Diane and John Rizzo. The Thanksgiving Table: Recipes and Ideas to Create Your Own Holiday Tradition. Pg. 122.
  6. ^ Sylvester the Cat - A Favorite Cartoon Cat

Further reading

External links

  • How to Make Succotash
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