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List of mythological objects

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List of mythological objects

Mythological objects (also known as mythical objects, mythic objects, or even god weapons in some cases) encompass a variety of items (e.g. weapons, armor, clothing) appearing in world mythologies. This list will be organized according to category of object.

Contents

  • Armor 1
    • Headgear 1.1
    • Shields 1.2
  • Weapons 2
    • Sword 2.1
      • Swords from Celtic mythology 2.1.1
      • Swords from Continental Germanic mythology 2.1.2
      • Swords from Anglo-Saxon mythology 2.1.3
      • Swords from the Matter of Britain 2.1.4
      • Swords from Norse mythology 2.1.5
      • Swords from the Matter of France 2.1.6
      • Swords from Spanish mythology 2.1.7
    • Spear 2.2
    • Bows 2.3
    • Rods and Staves 2.4
    • Axe and Hammer 2.5
    • Clubs 2.6
    • Projectile Weapons 2.7
  • Clothing 3
  • Jewellery 4
    • Necklaces 4.1
    • Rings 4.2
  • Vehicles 5
    • Airborne 5.1
    • Ships 5.2
    • Chariots 5.3
  • Treasures 6
    • Relic 6.1
  • Books 7
  • Stones 8
  • Plants and Herbs 9
  • Foods 10
  • Substances 11
  • Miscellaneous 12
  • References 13

Armor

Headgear

Shields

  • Aegis, Zeus' shield, often loaned to his daughter Athena, also used by Perseus. (Greek mythology)
  • Ancile, the shield of the Roman god Mars.
  • Priwen, the shield of King Arthur. (Arthurian legend)
  • Shield of Achilles. (Greek mythology)
  • Shield of Ajax. (Greek mythology)
  • Shield of Joseph of Arimathea, according to Arthurian legend it was carried by three maidens to Arthur's castle where it was discovered by Sir Percival. In Perlesvaus he uses it to defeat the Knight of the Burning Dragon. (Arthurian legend)
  • Shield of Judas Maccabee, a red shield emblazoned with a golden eagle. According to Arthurian legend the same shield was later found and used by Gawain after he defeated an evil knight.
  • Shield of El Cid, according to the epic poem Carmen Campidoctoris, bears the image of a fierce shining golden dragon.[1]
  • Shield of Evalach, a white shield belonging to king Evalach. Josephus of Arimathea painted a red cross upon it with his own blood, which granted the owner heavenly protection. It was later won by Sir Galahad.
  • Svalinn, a shield which stands before the sun and protects earth from burning. (Norse mythology)
  • Shield of Vishnu, Srivatsa, A symbol worshiped and revered by the Hindus, said to be manifested in the god's chest. (Hindu mythology)

Weapons

  • Carnwennan, the dagger of King Arthur. (Arthurian legend)
  • Cronus' scythe, Cronus castrated his father Uranus using an Adamant sickle given to him by his mother Gaea. (Greek mythology)
  • Death's scythe, a large scythe appearing in the hands of the Grim Reaper. This stems mainly from the Christian Biblical belief of death as a "harvester of souls".
  • Pashupatastra, an irresistible and most destructive personal weapon of Shiva and Kali, discharged by the mind, the eyes, words, or a bow. (Hindu mythology)
  • Varunastra, a water weapon (a storm) according to the Indian scriptures, incepted by Varuna. In stories it is said to assume any weapon's shape, just like water. (Hindu mythology)
  • Astra, a supernatural weapon, presided over by a specific deity. To summon or use an astra required knowledge of a specific incantation/invocation, when armed. (Hindu mythology)
  • Sling-stone (also cloich tabaill), was used by Lugh to slay his grandfather, Balor the Strong-Smiter in the Cath Maige Tuired according to the brief accounts in the Lebor Gabála Érenn. (Irish mythology)

Swords

Swords from Celtic mythology

  • Caladbolg (also Caladcholg), the sword of Fergus mac Róich and powerful enough to cut the tops off three hills; related to the Caledfwlch of Welsh mythology.
  • Caledfwlch, often compared to Excalibur. This sword is used by Llenlleawg Wyddel to kill Diwrnach Wyddel and his men.
  • Ceard-nan Gallan, the Smith of the Branches, sword of Oisín.
  • Claíomh Solais (Sword of Light), the sword of Nuada Airgeadlámh.
  • Cosgarach Mhor, the Great Triumphant One, sword of Oscar.
  • Cruadh-Chosgarach, the Hard Destroying One, sword of Caílte mac Rónáin.
  • Dyrnwyn, the Sword of Rhydderch.
  • Manannán mac Lir and Lugh Lamfada. No armor could stop it, and it would grant its wielder command over the powers of wind.
  • Mac an Luin, the Son of the Waves, sword of Fionn mac Cumhaill.
  • Moralltach (Great Fury) and Beagalltach (Little Fury), swords given to Diarmuid Ua Duibhne by his father Aengus.
  • Singing Sword of Conaire Mór.

Swords from Continental Germanic mythology

Swords from Anglo-Saxon mythology

Swords from the Matter of Britain

  • Arondight, Lancelot's sword.
  • Carnwennan, The dagger Arthur used.
  • Clarent, a ceremonial sword of King Arthur stolen and used by Mordred.
  • Coreiseuse, The sword of King Ban, Lancelot's father. Coreiseuse means wrathful.
  • Excalibur, also known as Caledfwlch in Welsh and Caliburnus in Latin, the sword which Merlin received from the Lady of the Lake.
  • Galatine, Gawain's sword.
  • Grail Sword, a cracked holy sword which Sir Percival bonded back together, though the crack remained.
  • Secace, The sword that Lancelot used to battle the Saxons at Saxon Rock. It is translated as Seure (Sequence) in the Vulgate Cycle.
  • Sword in the Stone which Arthur pulled free to become King of Britain. Sometimes equated with Excalibur.
  • Sword with the Red Hilt, One of the swords wielded by Sir Balin. After his death Merlin sealed it in the float stone where it remained until it was drawn by Sir Galahad.

Swords from Norse mythology

  • Angurvadal, a magical sword of Frithiof.
  • Dáinsleif is king Högni's sword, according to Snorri Sturluson's account of the battle known as the Hjaðningavíg.
  • Freyr's Sword, Freyr's magic sword which fought on its own. It might be Lævateinn.
  • Sigurd and used it to slay the dragon Fafnir. After being reforged, it could cleave an anvil in half.
  • Hǫfuð, the sword of Heimdallr, the guardian of Bifröst.
  • Hrotti, the sword is mentioned in the Völsung cycle. It was part of Fáfnir's treasure, which Sigurðr took after he slew the dragon.
  • Lævateinn, a sword mentioned in an emendation to the Poetic Edda Fjölsvinnsmál by Sophus Bugge.
  • Legbiter, the sword of Magnus III of Norway.
  • Mistilteinn, the magical sword of Prainn, the draugr, later owned by Hromundr Gripsson.
  • Quern-biter, sword of Haakon I of Norway and his follower, Thoralf Skolinson the Strong, said to be sharp enough to cut through quernstones.
  • Ridill (also Refil), sword of the dwarf Regin.
  • Skofnung, a sword with mythical properties associated with the legendary Danish king Hrólf Kraki.
  • Tyrfing (also Tirfing or Tyrving), the cursed sword of Svafrlami, from the Elder Edda; also said to be the sword of Odin in Richard Wagner's works.

Swords from the Matter of France

Swords from Spanish mythology

Spears

  • Amenonuhoko (Heavenly Jewelled Spear), the naginata used by the Shinto deities Izanagi and Izanami to create the world - also called tonbogiri. (Japanese mythology)
  • Ascalon, the St. George used to kill the dragon.
  • Gáe Buide (Yellow Shaft) and the Gáe Derg (Red Javelin), spears of Diarmuid Ua Duibhne, could inflict wound that none can recover from.
  • Gáe Bulg, the spear of Cú Chulainn.
  • Gungnir, Odin's magic spear created by the dwarf Dvalinn.
  • Lance of Olyndicus, the celtiberians' war chief who fought against Rome. According to Florus, he wielded a silver lance that was sent to him by the gods from the sky.[7]
  • Lug's Spear, an insuperable spear.
  • Lugh to use in his fight against Balor.
  • Nihongo, is one of three legendary Japanese spears created by the famed swordsmith Masazane Fujiwara. A famous spear that was once used in the Imperial Palace. Nihongo later found its way into the possession of Masanori Fukushima, and then Tahei Mori.
  • Otegine, is one of three legendary Japanese spears created by the famed swordsmith Masazane Fujiwara.
  • Rhongomiant, the spear of King Arthur. (Arthurian legend)
  • Sha Wujing's Yuèyáchǎn, a double-headed staff with a crescent-moon (yuèyá) blade at one end and a spade (chǎn) at the other, with six xīzhàng rings in the shovel part to denote its religious association.
  • Spear of Achilles, created by Hephaestus and given to Peleus at his wedding with Thetis.
  • Tonbogiri, is one of three legendary Japanese spears created by the famed swordsmith Masazane Fujiwara, said to be wielded by the legendary daimyō Honda Tadakatsu. The spear derives its name from the myth that a dragonfly landed on its blade and was instantly cut in two. Thus Tonbo (Japanese for "dragonfly") and giri (Japanese for "cutting"), translating this spear's name as "Dragonfly Cutter/Cutting spear".
  • Bident, a two-pronged implement resembling a pitchfork. In classical mythology, the bident is associated with Pluto/Hades, the ruler of the underworld. (Greek mythology)
  • Kongō, A trident-shaped staff which emits a bright light in the darkness, and grants wisdom and insight. The staff belonged originally to the Japanese mountain god Kōya-no-Myōjin. It is the equivalent of the Sanskrit Vajra, the indestructible lightning-diamond pounder of the king of the gods/rain-god Indra. There the staff represents the three flames of the sacrificial fire, part of the image of the vajra wheel.
  • Poseidon's trident, used to create horses and some water sources in Greece. It could cause earthquakes when struck on the ground. (Greek mythology)
  • Trishula, the trident of Shiva, stylized by some as used as a missile weapon and often included a crossed stabilizer to facilitate flight when thrown. Considered to be the most powerful weapon. (Hindu mythology)
  • Holy Lance, also called the Spear of Longinus, is the name given to the lance that pierced the side of Jesus as he hung on the cross, according to the Gospel of John.
  • Vel, a divine javelin associated with Hindu war god Karthikeya. (Hindu mythology)
  • Gae Assail (Spear of Assal), the spear of Lugh, the incantation "Ibar (Yew)" made the cast always hit its mark, and "Athibar (Re-Yew)" caused the spear to return. (Irish mythology)
  • Areadbhair, belonged to Pisear, king of Persia. Its tip had to be kept immersed in a pot of water to keep it from igniting, a property similar to the Lúin of Celtchar. (Irish mythology)
  • Crann Buidhe, the spear of Manannán. (Irish mythology)

Bows

Rods and Staves

Axes and Hammers

Clubs

  • Sharur, the enchanted mace of the Sumerian god Ninurta. It can fly unaided and also may communicate with its wielder. (Ancient Mesopotamian religion)
  • Yagrush and Ayamur, two clubs created by Kothar and used by Baal to defeat Yam. (Phoenician mythology)
  • Indravarman III's metalwood bat is a legendary bat, wielded by a Cambodian emperor.[9]
  • Kaladanda, the staff of Death[10] is a special and lethal club used by God Yama or God of Naraka or Hell in Hindu mythology. It is very ferocious weapon. It was once granted by Brahma or God of creation. It was ultimate weapon, once fired would kill anybody before it. No matter what boons he had to protect himself.
  • Club of Dagda, this magic club was supposed to be able to kill nine men with one blow; but with the handle he could return the slain to life. (Irish Mythology)
  • Gada, the main weapon of the Hindu god Hanuman, an avatara of Shiva. (Hindu Mythology)

Projectile Weapons

Clothing

Jewellery

Necklaces

Rings

  • Andvaranaut, a magical ring capable of producing gold, first owned by Andvari. (Norse mythology)
  • Draupnir, a golden arm ring possessed by Odin. The ring was a source of endless wealth. (Norse mythology)
  • Ring of Dispel, a ring given to Sir Lancelot by the Lady of the Lake which could dispel any enchantment. In Le Chevalier de la Charrette it is given to him by a fairy instead. He used the ring to cross the Sword Bridge.
  • Ring of Mudarra, the ring that Gonzalo Bustos breaks in two pieces to later on recognize his future son. When Mudarra joins the two halves, it becomes again a complete ring and Gonzalo Bustos heals his blindness, as shown in the epic poem Cantar de los siete infantes de Lara.[11]
  • Ring of Gyges, a mythical magical artifact that granted its owner the power to become invisible at will. (Greek mythology)
  • Seal of Solomon, a magical brass or steel ring that could imprison demons. (JudeoChristian mythology)
  • Svíagris, Adils' prized ring in the Hrólfr Kraki's saga. (Norse mythology)

Vehicles

Airborne

Ships

Chariots

Treasures

Relics

Books

Stones

  • Baetylus, a sacred stone which was supposedly endowed with life. (Greek mythology)
  • Cintamani (also Chintamani Stone), a wish-fulfilling jewel within both Hindu and Buddhist traditions, equivalent to the philosopher's stone in Western alchemy.
  • Philosopher's stone, it could turn lead into gold.
  • Sessho-seki, a stone that kills anyone who comes into contact with it.
  • Stone of Giramphiel, a stone described in Diu Crône. Sir Gawain wins from the knight Fimbeus and it offers him protection against the fiery breath of dragons and the magic of the sorcerer Laamorz.
  • Singasteinn (Old Norse singing stone or chanting stone), an object that appears in the account of Loki and Heimdallr's fight in the form of seals. (Norse mythology)
  • Llech Ronw (also Slate of Gron), a holed stone located along Afon Bryn Saeth in Blaenau Ffestiniog, Wales. The stone is described as being roughly forty inches by thirty inches with a hole of about an inch in diameter going through it.
  • Adder stone were believed to have magical powers such as protection against eye diseases or evil charms, preventing nightmares, curing whooping cough, the ability to see through fairy or witch disguises and traps if looked at through the middle of the stone, and of course recovery from snakebite.
  • Lyngurium (also Ligurium), the name of a mythical gemstone believed to be formed of the solidified urine of the lynx (the best ones coming from wild males).
  • Toadstone (also Bufonite), a mythical stone or gem thought to be found in, or produced by, a toad, and is supposed to be an antidote to poison.
  • Stone of Scone (also Stone of Destiny), an oblong block of red sandstone.
  • Sledovik, a most widespread type of sacred stones, venerated in Slavic (Russian, Belarussian, Ukrainian) and Uralic (Karela, Merya) pagan practices.
  • Lia Fáil (also Stone of Destiny) is a stone at the Inauguration Mound on the Hill of Tara in County Meath, Ireland. In legend, all of the kings of Ireland were crowned on the stone up to Muirchertach mac Ercae c. AD 500.
  • Thunderstone, throughout Europe, Asia, and Polynesia - flint arrowheads and axes turned up by farmer's plows are considered to have fallen from the sky. They were often thought to be thunderbolts and are called "thunderstones".
  • Gjöll, the name of the rock which Fenrir the wolf is bound. (Norse mythology)
  • Batrachite, gemstones that was supposedly found in frogs, to which ancient physicians and naturalists attributed the virtue of resisting poison.
  • Vaidurya, most precious of all stones, sparkling beauty beyond compare, the stone worn by the goddess Lakshmi and the goddess of wealth Rigveda. (Hindu Mythology)

Plants and Herbs

  • Aglaophotis, an herb. According to Dioscorides, peony is used for warding off demons, witchcraft, and fever.
  • Fern flower, a magic flower that blooms for a very short time on the eve of the Summer solstice. The flower brings fortune to the person who finds it. (Slavic mythology)
  • Hungry grass (also Féar Gortach), a patch of cursed grass. Anyone walking on it was doomed to perpetual and insatiable hunger. (Irish mythology)
  • Lotus tree, a plant that occurs in stories from Greek mythology and later in the Book of Job.
  • Moly, a magical herb Hermes gave to Odysseus to protect him from Circe's magic when he went to her home to rescue his friends.
  • Raskovnik, a magical herb in Slavic mythology. According to lore, the raskovnik has the magical property to unlock or uncover anything that is locked or closed.
  • Ausadhirdipyamanas, healing plants. Used for healing and rejuvenations in battles. These are used by Ashvins. (Hindu mythology)
  • Haoma, is the Avestan language name of a plant and its divinity, both of which play a role in Zoroastrian doctrine and in later Persian culture and mythology.

Foods

  • Ambrosia, the food or drink of the gods often depicted as conferring longevity or immortality upon whoever consumed it. (Greek mythology)
  • Apple of Discord, the goddess Eris inscribed "to the fairest" and tossed in the midst of the festivities at the wedding of Peleus and Thetis. (Greek mythology)
  • Cornucopia (also Horn of Plenty), was the horn of the goat-nymph Amalthea from which poured an unceasing abundance of nectar, ambrosia and fruit. (Greek mythology)
  • Golden apple, an element that appears in various national and ethnic folk legends or fairy tales.
  • Peaches of Immortality, consumed by the immortals due to their mystic virtue of conferring longevity on all who eat them. (Chinese mythology)
  • Mead of poetry (also Mead of Suttungr), is a mythical beverage that whoever "drinks becomes a skald or scholar to recite any information and solve any question. (Norse mythology)
  • Amrita, the drink of the gods which grants them immortality. (Hindu mythology)
  • Soma, it is described as being prepared by extracting juice from the stalks of a certain plant. In both Vedic and Zoroastrian tradition, the name of the drink and the plant are the same, and also personified as a divinity, the three forming a religious or mythological unity. (Hindu mythology)

Substances

  • Adamant and similar words are used to refer to any especially hard substance, whether composed of diamond, some other gemstone, or some type of metal.
  • Alkahest, a hypothetical universal solvent, having the power to dissolve every other substance, including gold. It was much sought after by alchemists for what they thought would be its invaluable medicinal qualities.
  • Azoth, it was considered to be a universal medicine or universal solvent sought in alchemy.
  • Eitr, this liquid substance is the origin of all living things: the first giant Ymir was conceived from eitr. The substance is supposed to be very poisonous and is also produced by Jörmungandr and other serpents. (Norse mythology)
  • Elixir of life, a mythical potion that, when drunk from a certain cup at a certain time, supposedly grants the drinker eternal life and/or eternal youth.
  • Ichor, is the ethereal golden fluid that is the blood of the gods and/or immortals. (Greek mythology)
  • Manna (also Mana), is an edible substance that, according to the Bible and the Quran. God provided for the Israelites during their travels in the desert.
  • Orichalcum, a metal mentioned in several ancient writings, including a story of Atlantis in the Critias dialogue, recorded by Plato. According to Critias, orichalcum was considered second only to gold in value, and was found and mined in many parts of Atlantis in ancient times.
  • Panacea, was supposed to be a remedy that would cure all diseases and prolong life indefinitely.
  • Prima materia (also Materia Prima or First Matter), is the ubiquitous starting material required for the alchemical magnum opus and the creation of the philosopher's stone. It is the primitive formless base of all matter similar to chaos, the quintessence, or aether.
  • Yliaster, is the formless base of all matter which is the raw material for the alchemical Great Work.
  • Hydra's poisonous blood, Heracles would use arrows dipped in the Hydra's poisonous blood to kill other foes during his Labours, such as Stymphalian birds and the giant Geryon. (Greek mythology)

Miscellaneous

  • Bone of Ullr, the god Ullr had a bone upon which spells were carved. (Norse mythology)
  • Clue of Ariadne, the magical ball of string given to Theseus by Ariadne to help him navigate the Labyrinth. (Greek Mythology)
  • Cup of Jamshid, a cup of divination in the Persian mythology. It was long possessed by rulers of ancient Persia and was said to be filled with an elixir of immortality. The whole world was said to be reflected in it.
  • Eldhrímnir, the cauldron in which Andhrímnir cooks Sæhrímnir. (Norse mythology)
  • Gleipnir, the magic chain that bound the wolf Fenrir. It was light and thin as silk but strong as creation itself and made from six wonderful ingredients. (Norse mythology)
  • Hand of Glory, a disembodied pickled hand of a man who was hung alive. Said to have the power to unlock any door and, if a candle was placed within made from some body part of the same person, would freeze in place anyone who it was given to.
  • Hlidskjalf, Odin's all-seeing throne in his palace Valaskjálf.
  • Horn of Gabriel, the name refers to the tradition identifying the Archangel Gabriel with the angel who blows the horn to announce Judgement Day, associating the infinite with the divine.
  • Lantern of Diogenes, according to popular legend, carried in broad daylight by the Cynic philosopher Diogenes of Sinope to aid in his fruitless search for an honest man.
  • Māui's Fishhook, used to catch the fish that would become New Zealand's North Island; the hook was also used to create the Hawaiian Islands. (Polynesian mythology)
  • Olivant, the horn of Roland, paladin of Charlemagne in the Song of Roland. It was won from the giant Jutmundus and is made of ivory. When blown, it is so loud that it kills birds flying in the sky and causes whole armies to rout.
  • Palladium, a wooden statue that fell from the sky. As long as it stayed in Troy, the city-state could not lose a war. (Greek mythology)
  • Reginnaglar, (Old Norse god nails) are nails used for religious purposes.
  • Sampo, a magical artifact of indeterminate type constructed by Ilmarinen that brought good fortune to its holder. (Finnish mythology)
  • The Smoking Mirror, the mirror that the god Tezcatlipoca uses to see the whole cosmos.
  • Winnowing Oar, an object that appears in Books XI and XXIII of Homer's Odyssey. (Greek mythology)
  • Pair Dadeni, a magical cauldron able to revive the dead. (Welsh mythology)
  • Nanteos Cup, a medieval wood mazer bowl, since the late 19th century it has been attributed with a supernatural ability to heal those who drink from it.
  • Óðrerir, refers either to one of the vessels that contain the mead of poetry (along with Boðn and Són) or to the mead itself. (Norse mythology)
  • Ankh, appears frequently in Egyptian tomb paintings and other art, often at the fingertips of a god or goddess. (Egyptian mythology)
  • Rati, the name of a drill or auger that was used by Odin during his quest to obtain the mead of poetry. (Norse mythology)
  • Gjallarhorn, a mystical horn blown at the onset of Ragnarök associated with the god Heimdallr and the wise being Mímir. (Norse mythology)
  • Benben, the mound that arose from the primordial waters, Nu, and on which the creator god Atum settled. (Egyptian mythology)
  • Loeðing and Drómi, the first and second fetter that was used to bound Fenrir which broke. (Norse mythology)
  • Svefnthorn (Sleep Thorn), it was used to put an adversary into a deep sleep from which he or she would not awaken for a long time. (Norse mythology)
  • Golden Fleece, sought by Jason and the Argonauts. (Greek mythology)
  • Excalibur's scabbard, was said to have powers of its own. Injuries from losses of blood, for example, would not kill the bearer. In some telling, wounds received by one wearing the scabbard did not bleed at all. (Arthurian legend)
  • Bragi's harp, a magical golden harp given to Bragi by the dwarfs when he was born. (Norse mythology)
  • Kantele, Kalevala, the mage Väinämöinen makes the first kantele from the jawbone of a giant pike and a few hairs from Hiisi's stallion. The music it makes draws all the forest creatures near to wonder at its beauty. (Finnish mythology)
  • Pot of Gold, Leprechaun store away all their coins in a hidden pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. (Irish mythology)
  • Triton's conch shell, a twisted conch shell on which Triton blew like a trumpet to calm or raise the waves. (Greek mythology)
  • Fountain of Youth, is a spring that supposedly restores the youth of anyone who drinks or bathes in its waters.
  • Magic Lamp, an oil lamp that can be rubbed in order to summon a genie who grants wishes. (Arabic mythology)
  • Bag of Wind, Aeolus gave Odysseus a tightly closed leather bag full of the captured winds so he could sail easily home to Ithaca on the gentle West Wind. (Greek mythology)

References

  1. ^ Carmen Campidoctoris o Poema latino del Campeador, Madrid, Sociedad Estatal España Nuevo Milenio, 2001
  2. ^ The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire. 3 Ch. XXXIV Part 1. 
  3. ^ Garbáty, Thomas Jay (1962). The Fallible Sword: Inception of a Motif. The Journal of American Folklore. American Folklore Society. ISBN 1-898577-10-2
  4. ^ Cantar de mio Cid Edition of Alberto Montaner. Ed. Galaxia Gutenberg, 2007.
  5. ^ Cantar de mio Cid. Edition of Alberto Montaner. Ed. Galaxia Gutenberg, 2007.
  6. ^ Don Juan Manuel. El Conde Lucanor. Barcelona: Losada, 1997.
  7. ^ Florus. Epitomae, 1.33.
  8. ^ D'après l'épigraphie cambodgienne du X° siècle, les rois des "Kambuja" prétendaient descendre d'un ancêtre mythique éponyme, le sage ermite Kambu, et de la nymphe céleste Mera, dont le nom a pu être forgé d'après l'appellation ethnique "khmèr" (George Coedes). [2]; See also: Indianised States of Southeast Asia, 1968, p 66, George Coedes.
  9. ^ Sri Dharmaraja
  10. ^ Smith, Bardwell L. "Hinduism: New Essays in the History of Religions". 
  11. ^ Épica medieval española (Cantar de los Siete Infantes de Lara). Madrid, Cátedra, 1991
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