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Blind audition

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Title: Blind audition  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Recruitment, Performing arts, Art Davis, Gender studies, Vienna Philharmonic
Collection: Music Performance, Performing Arts, Recruitment
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Blind audition

A blind audition refers to a musical audition in which the person being tested performs from behind a wall or screen. The purpose is to assure that the decision-makers are judging a musician solely on his or her performance, with no consideration of the musician's appearance.

History

Research published in American Economic Review suggests the use of blind auditions also changed the role that gender apparently plays during auditions. According to a 2001 study by Cecilia Rouse of Princeton and Claudia Goldin of Harvard, the introduction of blind auditions to American symphony orchestras increased the probability that a woman would advance from preliminary rounds by 50 percent. According to the study, among those symphonies, "about 10 percent of orchestra members were female around 1970, compared to about 35 percent in the mid-1990s. Rouse and Goldin attribute about 30 percent of this gain to the advent of blind auditions."[1]

Jazz bassist and clinical psychologist Art Davis is known for launching a legal case which led to the current system of blind auditions for orchestras.[2][3]

In 2010, the competitive talent show The Voice of Holland introduced the use of blind auditions to televised talent shows; the format was then quickly franchised to dozens of other countries.

References

  1. ^ Marks, Marilyn (February 12, 2001). "Blind auditions key to hiring musicians". Princeton Weekly Bulletin. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  2. ^ Stewart, Jocelyn Y. (August 5, 2007). "Art Davis, renowned bassist, dies at 73". Los Angeles Times obituary. Seattle Times. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
  3. ^ Osborne, William. "Blind Auditions and Moral Myopia". osborne-conant.org. Retrieved 2012-12-28. 
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