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North Dakota elections, 2014

A general election will be held in the U.S. state of North Dakota on November 4, 2014. Five of North Dakota's executive officers are up for election as well as the state's at-large seat in the United States House of Representatives. Primary elections will be held on June 10, 2014.[1]

Contents

  • Attorney General 1
  • Secretary of State 2
  • Commissioner of Agriculture 3
  • Tax Commissioner 4
  • Public Services Commissioner 5
  • United States House of Representatives 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Attorney General

Incumbent Republican Attorney General Wayne Stenehjem, who has served in the office since January 1, 2001, is running for re-election to a fifth term.[2]

Kiara Kraus-Parr, an attorney and adjunct law professor at the University of North Dakota, is running for the Democrats.[3]

Secretary of State

Incumbent Republican Secretary of State Alvin Jaeger, who has served in the office since January 1, 1993, is running for re-election to a sixth term.[4]

Non-profit director, former State Representative and former State Senator April Fairfield is running for the Democrats[5] and businessman, perennial candidate and Chairman of the Libertarian Party of North Dakota Roland Riemers is running for the Libertarians.[6]

Commissioner of Agriculture

Incumbent Republican Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring, who has served in the office since April 6, 2009, is running for re-election to second term.[2]

Goehring was the only Republican or Democrat to face a contested nomination for any statewide position. After he made insensitive comments to female staffers, farmer and nurse Judy Estenson challenged him for the Republican nomination.[7][8] The North Dakota Farm Bureau, which Goehring was a former Vice President of, opposed his bid for re-election,[9] and he announced that if did not win the Republican endorsement, he would run in the primary in June, though he ruled out running as an Independent in the general election.[10][11] At the Republican convention on April 6, 2014,[12] Goehring defeated Estenson by 624 votes to 245.[13]

Rancher, former State Senator and nominee for Governor in 2012 Ryan Taylor is running for the Democrats.[14][15]

Goehring has raised more money but Taylor, who is running on a platform of tighter regulation of the state's oil industry, is a strong campaigner and the race is considered a tossup.[16]

Poll source Date(s)
administered
Sample
size
Margin of
error
Doug
Goehring (R)
Ryan
Taylor (D)
Other Undecided
Mellman Group* May 5–8, 2014 600 ± 4% 36% 36% 28%
  • * Poll for the North Dakota Democratic-Nonpartisan League Party

Tax Commissioner

Incumbent Republican Tax Commissioner Ryan Rauschenberger, who was appointed to the office on January 1, 2014,[17] after Republican incumbent Cory Fong resigned to join the private sector,[18] is running for election to a first full term.[19]

Democratic attorney Jason Astrup and Libertarian television producer Anthony Mangnall are also running.[6][20]

Public Services Commissioner

Two of the three seats on the North Dakota Public Service Commission are up for election.

Incumbent Republican Commissioner 2 Julie Fedorchak, who was appointed to the position in January 2013 after Kevin Cramer resigned after being elected to the House of Representatives,[21] is running in the special election to fill the remaining two years of his term.[22] State Senator Tyler Axness is running for the Democrats.[23]

Incumbent Republican Commissioner 3 Brian Kalk, the Chairman of the Commission, is running for re-election to a second term in office.[24] Democratic businessman Todd Reisenauer is also running.[25]

United States House of Representatives

North Dakota's at-large seat in the United States House of Representatives will be up for election in 2014.

References

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  15. ^ http://www.agweek.com/event/article/id/24140/
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External links

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