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Adam Comorosky

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Adam Comorosky

Adam Comorosky
Outfielder
Born: (1905-12-09)December 9, 1905
Swoyersville, Pennsylvania
Died: March 2, 1951(1951-03-02) (aged 45)
Swoyersville, Pennsylvania
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
September 13, 1926 for the Pittsburgh Pirates
Last MLB appearance
September 18, 1935 for the Cincinnati Reds
Career statistics
Batting average .285
Home runs 28
RBI 417
Teams

Career highlights and awards

  • Is the only National League outfielder ever to have two unassisted double plays in a season. They occurred on May 31, 1931 and June 6, 1931.
  • Held the Pittsburgh Pirates team record for most doubles in a season by a right-handed batter for 76 years (47) until the record was broken by Freddy Sanchez in 2006 (48).
  • Led the Major League in triples (23) and sacrifice hits (a tie with the Philadelphia Athletics's Mule Haas with 33) in 1930.
  • Posthumously awarded membership into the Wyoming Valley Sports Hall of Fame in 1971, the first year membership was decided.

Adam Anthony Comorosky (December 9, 1905 – March 2, 1951) was an American former Major League Baseball player. He started working in the coal mines of Swoyersville, Pennsylvania, at the age of 12, where he worked as a breaker boy. His lesson from the experience was that it "teach[es] you values. If you're ever lucky enough to get a good job outside, you value that job."[1]

He was traded to the Cincinnati Reds November 1933 along with Tony Piet for Red Lucas and Wally Roettger.

His minor league career included stops with the Williamsport Grays in 1926[2] and the Minneapolis Millers in 1936[3] After his baseball career was over, he owned a store in the town of Swoyersville, Pennsylvania until his death at the age of 46.

The New York Times on March 6, 1951 printed his obituary, which read:

Wilkes Barre, Pa., March 3—Adam Comorosky, retired major league baseball player, died at his home in Swoyersville shortly before midnight after a long illness.

An outfielder, he joined the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1927 and was traded to Cincinnati in 1934. In 1930, when he batter .315, he led the National League with 23 triples.[4]

See also

References

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference
  • Wyoming Valley Sports Hall of Fame, 1971
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