World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Atari Punk Console

Article Id: WHEBN0009792438
Reproduction Date:

Title: Atari Punk Console  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Circuit bending, Electronic musical instruments, DIY culture, Kraakdoos, Reed Ghazala
Collection: Diy Culture, Electronic Musical Instruments
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Atari Punk Console

Circuit diagram of an implementation of Atari Punk Console

The Atari Punk Console (commonly shortened to APC) is a popular circuit that utilizes two 555 timer ICs or a single 556 dual timer IC. The original circuit, called a "Sound Synthesizer", was published in a Radio Shack booklet: "Engineer's Notebook: Integrated Circuit Applications" in 1980[1] and later called "Stepped Tone Generator" in "Engineer's Mini-Notebook - 555 Circuits" by its designer, Forrest M. Mims III (Siliconcepts, 1984).[2] It was named "Atari Punk Console" (APC) by Kaustic Machines crew because its "low-fi" sounds resemble classic Atari console games from the 1980s, with a square wave output similar to the Atari 2600. Kaustic Machines added a -4db line level output to the circuit which was originally designed to drive a small 8 ohm speaker.

Atari Punk console is an astable square wave oscillator driving a monostable oscillator that creates a single (square) pulse. There are two controls, one for the frequency of the oscillator and one to control the width of the pulse. The controls are usually potentiometers but the circuit can also be controlled by light, temperature, pressure etc. by replacing a potentiometer with a suitable sensor (e.g., photo resistor for light sensitivity). Most of the time there is also a power switch (often a toggle switch) and a volume knob.

The circuit is a simple DIY noisemaker circuit that is relatively inexpensive and easy to build, easily adaptable and is configurable in many ways. It has been built into a wide variety of cases, from metal IKEA bowls to light bulbs, an old Atari mouse or joystick. Its flexibility has led to wide scale popularity among electronics enthusiasts. It is often suggested as a good circuit to build for beginners.

See also

External links

  • Original schematics
  • Kaustic Machines added a line out to the APC
  • Forrest M. Mims III web page
  • PCB layout for dual 555 version
  • Page describing the circuit + schematic + video sample
  • Forrest M. Mims III Atari Punk Console Project description
  • Atari Punk Console fan page

'

References

  1. ^ "Engineer's Notebook: Integrated Circuit Applications". Jameco. Retrieved 13 September 2014. 
  2. ^ "Engineer's Mini-Notebook" (PDF). Radio Shack. Archived from the original (PDF) on 22 August 2013. Retrieved 13 September 2014. 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.