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Bobby Abrams

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Bobby Abrams

Bobby Abrams
No. 24 (Michigan), 51 (Giants), 50 (Cowboys, Vikings)
Position: Linebacker
Personal information
Date of birth: (1967-04-12) April 12, 1967
Place of birth: Detroit, Michigan
Height: 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)
Weight: 240 lb (109 kg)
Career information
High school: Henry Ford (Detroit, MI)
College: Michigan
Career history
Career NFL statistics
Games played: 74
Games started: 3
Stats at NFL.com
Stats at pro-football-reference.com

Robert E. "Bobby" Abrams, Jr. (born April 12, 1967) is a former American football player. He played college football as defensive back and linebacker for the University of Michigan from 1986 to 1989. He played professional football in the National Football League (NFL) for six seasons as a linebacker and special teams player for the New York Giants (19901992, Cleveland Browns (1992), Dallas Cowboys (19921993), Minnesota Vikings (19931994) and New England Patriots (1995).

Contents

  • Early years 1
  • University of Michigan 2
  • Professional football 3
  • References 4

Early years

Abrams was born in Detroit, Michigan, in 1967. He attended Henry Ford High School in Detroit.[1]

University of Michigan

Abrams enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1985 and played college football for head coach Bo Schembechler's Michigan Wolverines football teams from 1986 to 1989.[2] He began as a defensive back at Michigan and was converted to a linebacker in 1987. He started nine games (seven at outside linebacker, two at inside linebacker) for the 1987 Michigan Wolverines football team.[3]

As a redshirt junior, he started all 12 games at outside linebacker for the 1988 Michigan team that compiled a 9-2-1 record, won the Big Ten Conference championship, defeated USC in the 1989 Rose Bowl, and finished the season ranked #4 in the final AP Poll.[4]

In his final year at Michigan, he again started all 12 games at outside linebacker for the 1989 Michigan team that compiled a 10-2 record, won a second consecutive Big Ten championship, lost to USC in the 1990 Rose Bowl, and finished the season ranked #7 in the final AP Poll.[5]

Professional football

Abrams went undrafted in the 1990 NFL Draft, but signed with the New York Giants. He appeared in 33 games, including two as a starter, for the Giants from 1990 to 1992. He was a backup linebacker for the Giants, behind Lawrence Taylor and Carl Banks.[1][6][7]

Abrams played three games with the Cleveland Browns in 1992 before joining the Dallas Cowboys for the last half of the 1992 season and the first five games of the 1993 NFL season.[1]

Abrams joined the Minnesota Vikings for the last four games of the 1993 season. He then appeared in all 16 games for the Vikings, principally as a special team player, during the 1994 NFL season. He led the Vikings with 28 special teams tackles in 1994.[1][7]

Abrams signed with the New England Patriots in March 1995.[7] He appeared in nine games, one as a starer, for the New England Patriots during the 1995.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Bobby Abrams". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved April 2, 2015. 
  2. ^ "All-Time Football Roster Database". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved April 1, 2015. 
  3. ^ "1987 Michigan Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved April 1, 2015. 
  4. ^ "1988 Michigan Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved April 1, 2015. 
  5. ^ "1989 Michigan Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved April 1, 2015. 
  6. ^ "There are plenty of candidates for Banks' job". The Day. August 20, 1992. p. C7. 
  7. ^ a b c "Abrams signs with New England". Bangor Daily News. March 2, 1995. p. D2. 
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