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Cephalic

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Cephalic

For other uses, see Head (disambiguation).


A head is the cephalic part of an animal, which usually comprises the brain, eyes, ears, nose and mouth, each of which aid in various sensory functions, such as sight, hearing, smell, and taste. Some very simple animals may not have a head, but many bilaterally symmetric forms do. Heads develop in animals by an evolutionary trend known as cephalization. In bilaterally symmetrical animals, nerve tissues concentrate at the anterior region, forming structures responsible for information processing. Through biological evolution, sense organs and feeding structures also concentrate into the anterior region; these collectively form the head.

Human head

Main article: Human head

In human anatomy, the head is the upper portion of the human body. It includes (from superficial to deep) the scalp and face, the skull, the sinuses and the brain. Humans have the largest head size relative to body size of any species.

Use in heraldry

Main article: Heads in heraldry

Both human and animal heads frequently occur as mobile charges in heraldry. The blazon, or heraldic description, usually states whether an animal's head is couped (as if cut off cleanly at the neck), erased (as if forcibly ripped from the body), or cabossed (turned affronté without any of the neck showing). Human heads are often described in much greater detail, though some of these are identified by name with little or no further description.

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