World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Cetrimonium bromide

Article Id: WHEBN0003441929
Reproduction Date:

Title: Cetrimonium bromide  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Antiseptic, Phenol, DODAB, Myristyl-benzalkonium, Household chemicals
Collection: Antiseptics, Bromides, Cationic Surfactants, Household Chemicals, Quaternary Ammonium Compounds
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Cetrimonium bromide

Cetrimonium bromide
Names
IUPAC name
hexadecyl-trimethyl-ammonium bromide
Identifiers
 Y
ATC code D08
R02
ChEBI  Y
ChEMBL  N
ChemSpider  Y
Jmol-3D images Image
KEGG  Y
PubChem
UNII  Y
Properties
C19H42BrN
Molar mass 364.45 g/mol
Appearance white powder
Melting point 237 to 243 °C (459 to 469 °F; 510 to 516 K) (decomposes)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
 N  (: Y/N?)

Cetrimonium bromide ((C16H33)N(CH3)3Br, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) is an amine based cationic quaternary surfactant.

It is one of the components of the topical antiseptic cetrimide.[1] The cetrimonium (or hexadecyltrimethylammonium) cation is an effective antiseptic agent against bacteria and fungi. Its uses also include providing a buffer solution for the extraction of DNA. It has been widely used in synthesis of gold nanoparticles (e.g., spheres, rods, bipyramids) and mesoporous silica nanoparticles (e.g., MCM-41). It is also widely used in hair conditioning products.

As any surfactant, it forms micelles in aqueous solutions. At 303 K (30 °C) it forms micelles with aggregation number 75-120 (depending on method of determination, usually average ~95) and degree of ionization α (fractional charge) 0.2–0.1 (from low to high concentration).

The standard constant of Br- counterion binding to the micelle at 303 K (30 °C) is K° ≈ 400. This value is calculated from Br- and CTA+ ion selective electrode measurements and conductometry data by using literature data for micelle size (r = ~3 nm), extrapolated to the critical micelle concentration of 1 mM. However, it varies with total surfactant concentration so it is extrapolated to the point at which the concentration of micelles is zero)

The closely related compounds cetrimonium chloride and cetrimonium stearate are also used as topic antiseptics, and may be found in many household products such as shampoos and cosmetics, while cetrimonium bromide, due to its high cost, is only found in select cosmetics.

Contents

  • Use of CTAB in protein electrophoresis 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • Further reading 4

Use of CTAB in protein electrophoresis

Because of the broad distribution of negative charges in glycoproteins, these form broad, fuzzy bands in SDS-PAGE (Laemmli-electrophoresis).[2] This can be avoided by using positively charged detergents like CTAB [3][4] instead of the negatively charged SDS. Proteins can be blotted from CTAB-gels in analogy to western blots ("eastern blot"), and CTAB-PAGE can be used as second dimension after IEF. Myelin-associated high hydrophobic protein can be analyzed using CTAB 2-DE.

See also

References

  1. ^ Ito., Emma (November 2009). "Editorial". Potential Use of Cetrimonium Bromide as an Apoptosis-Promoting Anticancer Agent for Head and Neck Cancer 76 (5): 969–983. Retrieved November 2009. 
  2. ^ Laemmli, UK (1970). "Cleavage of structural proteins during the assembly of the head of bacteriophage T4". Nature 227 (5259): 680–5.  
  3. ^ Buxbaum, Engelbert (2003). "Cationic electrophoresis and electrotransfer of membrane glycoproteins". Analytical Biochemistry 314 (1): 70–6.  
  4. ^ E. Buxbaum: Cationic electrophoresis and eastern blotting. In: B.T. Kurien & R.H. Scofield (ed): Protein blotting and detection – Methods and protocols, (Meth. Mol. Biol. 536), Dordrecht (Humana) 2009, ISBN 978-1-934115-73-2, pp. 115–28

Further reading

  • Merck Index, 11th Edition, 1989.
  • Drug information
  • Chemicalland21
  • Household Products data base for cetrimonium chloride
  • Household Products data base for cetrimonium bromide
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.