World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Diamond T

The Diamond T was an American automobile manufactured in Chicago from 1905 until 1911 by the Diamond T Motor Car Company. It was a powerful touring car (models up to 70 hp were available). The company later became known for its trucks. By 1967, as a subsidiary of White Motor Company, it was merged with Reo Motor Company to become Diamond Reo Trucks, Inc.[1]

During World War II, Diamond T produced a classic heavy truck in the 980/981, a prime mover which was quickly acquired by the British Purchasing Commission for duty as a tank transporter tractor. Coupled with a Rogers trailer, the truck gave sterling service with the British Army in North Africa Campaign, where its power and rugged construction allowed the rescue of damaged tanks in the most demanding of conditions.[2] In addition Diamond T built the entire range of the G509 series 4 ton 6X6s, including cargo, dump, semi tractor, and wrecker trucks,[3] as well as some lighter trucks, and even G7102 half tracks.[4] Diamond T ranked 47th among United States corporations in the value of World War II military production contracts.[5]

Diamond T manufactured two pickup trucks: the Model 80 and the Model 201. Both pickups were powered by the Hercules QX-series 6-cylinder engines. The Model 201 was produced from 1938 to 1949.

Diamond T Truck 1937
Diamond T Wrecker 1941
Diamond T 969A Wrecker 1943
1958 Diamond T 630

Contents

  • Models 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Models

Cars[6]

Model and Year Engine HP Wheelbase
Diamond T(1907) Four-cylinder 40 114"
Diamond T(1908) Four-cylinder 50 114"
Diamond T(1909) Four-cylinder 50 114"
Model D(1910) Four-cylinder 35 108"
Model E(1910) Four-cylinder 45 124"
Diamond T(1911) Four-cylinder 45 124"

See also

References

  1. ^ Wren, James A.; Wren, Genevieve (1979). Motor Trucks of America. Ann Arbor MI: The University of Michigan Press. p. 264.  
  2. ^ Doyle, David (2003). Standard catalog of U.S. Military Vehicles. Kraus Publications. p. 230-231.  
  3. ^ Doyle (2003), p. 161-166.
  4. ^ Doyle (2003), p. 386-396.
  5. ^ Peck, Merton J. & Scherer, Frederic M. The Weapons Acquisition Process: An Economic Analysis (1962) Harvard Business School p.619
  6. ^ Kimes, Beverly (1996). standard catalog of American Cars 1805-1942. Krause publications.  
  •  

External links

  • Diamond T(and REO) Trucks (Hank's Truck Pictures)


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.