World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Glottis

Article Id: WHEBN0000013079
Reproduction Date:

Title: Glottis  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Phonation, Modal voice, Line spectral pairs, Creaky voice, Place of articulation
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Glottis

Glottis
Arytenoid cartilage
Glottis positions
Identifiers
MeSH A04.329.364
TA [1]
FMA FMA:55414
Anatomical terminology

The glottis is defined as the vocal folds and the opening between them (the rima glottidis).[1]

Structure

Function

Phonation

As the vocal folds vibrate, the resulting vibration produces a "buzzing" quality to the speech, called voice or voicing or pronunciation.

Sound production involving only the glottis is called glottal. English has a voiceless glottal transition spelled "h". In many accents of English the glottal stop (made by pressing the folds together) is used as a variant allophone of the phoneme /t/ (and in some dialects, occasionally of /k/ and /p/); in some languages, this sound is a phoneme of its own.

Skilled players of the Australian didgeridoo restrict their glottal opening in order to produce the full range of timbres available on the instrument.[2]

The vibration produced is an essential component of voiced consonants as well as vowels. If the vocal folds are drawn apart, air flows between them causing no vibration, as in the production of voiceless consonants.

The glottis is also important in the valsalva maneuver.

  • Voiced consonants include /v/, /z/, /ʒ/, /d͡ʒ/, /ð/, /b/, /d/, /ɡ/, /w/.
  • Voiceless consonants include /f/, /s/, /ʃ/, /t͡ʃ/, /θ/, /p/, /t/, /k/, /ʍ/, and /h/.

Additional images

Larynx 
The entrance to the larynx, viewed from behind. 
The entrance to the larynx. 
Glottis 
Larynx, pharynx and tongue. Deep dissection.Posterior view. 
Larynx, pharynx and tongue. Deep dissection.Posterior view. 
Larynx, pharynx and tongue. Deep dissection.Posterior view. 

References

  1. ^ Glottis at eMedicine Dictionary
  2. ^ See "Acoustics: The vocal tract and the sound of a didgeridoo", by Tarnopolsky et al. in Nature 436, 39 (7 July 2005))

External links

  • States of the Glottis (Esling & Harris, University of Victoria)
  • Universität Stuttgart Speech production
  • de Menezes Lyra R. Glottis simulator. Anesth Analg. 1999 Jun;88(6):1422-3.[2]
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.