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J-bar lift

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Title: J-bar lift  
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Subject: Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, Chairlift, Dick Durrance, T-bar lift, Park City Mountain Resort, Surface lift, L bar, J-bar, Gore Mountain (ski resort)
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J-bar lift

A J-bar (L-bar in some regions) is a type of surface lift[1] for ski area passenger transport. They are named for the shape of the carrier which has a long vertical bar curving to a short horizontal bar. Invented in the 1930s, they are now rarely in operation having been superseded by T-bars which have twice the capacity at basically the same price.

A J-bar closely resembles a T-bar, except each carrier holds only one passenger. The operation is similar: the passenger stands in position and waits for the next carrier. The passenger guides the carrier to hook around the upper thighs or buttocks while standing on the snow. The lift slides them uphill on the surface.

J-Bars were installed in the 1930s in North America and Australia, with The Ski Hoist at Charlotte Pass in Australia dating from 1938.[2]

Both T-bars and J-bars have many disadvantages compared to chairlifts: require more passenger skills than a chair, surface must be continuous, impedes skiable terrain, slow speed, limited capacity,

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