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Josh Huston

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Josh Huston

Josh Huston
No. -- Free agent
Position: Placekicker
Personal information
Date of birth: (1982-02-28) February 28, 1982
Place of birth: Findlay, Ohio
Height: 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m)
Weight: 209 lb (95 kg)
Career information
College: Ohio State
Undrafted: 2006
Career history
 * Offseason and/or practice squad member only
Roster status: Active
Career NFL statistics
Stats at NFL.com

Josh Huston (born February 28, 1982 in Findlay, Ohio) is an American football placekicker who is currently a free agent. He was signed by the Chicago Bears as an undrafted free agent in 2006. He played college football at Ohio State.

Huston has also been a member of the Las Vegas Gladiators and Cincinnati Bengals.

Contents

  • Early years 1
  • College career 2
  • Professional career 3
    • Chicago Bears 3.1
    • Las Vegas Gladiators 3.2
    • First stint with Giants 3.3
    • Cincinnati Bengals 3.4
    • Second stint with Giants 3.5
  • Personal 4
  • References 5

Early years

Huston played high school football at Findlay High School, where he earned first-team All-Ohio honors as a junior. His holder at Findlay was current National Football League quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. His high school play ended as the Findlay Trojans lost in the Division I regional semifinals to Grove City, 59-41.[1] Josh is related to Army ROTC officer, Nate Huston.

College career

After graduating in 2000, he signed to play for Ohio State. He was redshirted in 2000, and lost the kicking job to Mike Nugent in 2001. In 2002, he was injured again, prompting him to petition the NCAA for a medical redshirt, giving him a sixth year of eligibility. This petition was eventually granted, and after being a backup to Nugent in 2003 and 2004, he took over the starting duty for the Buckeyes in 2005. During that season, he established himself as one of the nation's top kickers, hitting 22 of 28 field goals and 44 of 45 extra points to score 110 points for the Buckeyes.

During a September 10, 2005 game against the 2005 Texas Longhorn football team, Josh Huston made five field goals and attempted a sixth. The five field goals by Josh Huston tied an Ohio State school and stadium record.[2][3][4] He now shares the school record with Mike Nugent (at North Carolina State, September 19, 2004) and Bob Atha (vs. Indiana, 24 October 1981 in Ohio Stadium).[2][3]

Professional career

Chicago Bears

Huston entered the 2006 NFL Draft, but was not selected. He signed on April 30 with the Chicago Bears. He was released by Chicago on August 24, 2006.

Las Vegas Gladiators

On November 2, 2006, Huston was signed by the Las Vegas Gladiators, of the Arena Football League.[5] However, before ever playing in an AFL game, the New York Giants signed him to their roster on January 12, 2007.[6]

First stint with Giants

With former New York Giant placekicker Jay Feely signing with the Miami Dolphins on March 7, 2007, the Giants were willing to hand their placekicking duties over to Huston. However, on May 22, 2007, the Giants traded for Kansas City Chiefs kicker Lawrence Tynes. After Tynes won the job, Huston was cut from the Giants on September 1, 2007.[7]

Cincinnati Bengals

Huston was signed to the practice squad of the Cincinnati Bengals on October 10, 2007, only to be cut five days later.

Second stint with Giants

On August 15, 2008, Huston was re-signed by the Giants. However, due to his struggles in preseason the Giants waived him on August 30, 2008.

Personal

On January 7, 2008, Huston won the "Alumni Kicker Challenge" for his alma mater OSU during halftime of the 2008 BCS National Championship, against former LSU kicker David Browndyke. Huston won $100,000 for the general scholarship fund of Ohio State.

References

  1. ^ OHSAA 1999 Tournament Results. OHSAA.org. Retrieved 2007-01-17.
  2. ^ a b "Texas vs Ohio State (Sep 10, 2005)". MackBrownTexasFootball. Retrieved 2006-07-30. 
  3. ^ a b Russo, Ralph. "No. 2 Texas 25, No. 4 Ohio State 22". Associated Press. Retrieved 2006-12-14. 
  4. ^ "Ohio State Defeated by Texas, 25-22 - Huston ties Buckeye and Ohio Stadium record with five made field goals". Ohio State University. September 11, 2006. Retrieved 2007-03-12. 
  5. ^ Thursday's sports transactions. Pittsburgh Tribune-Review. Retrieved 2006-11-07.
  6. ^ Giants News. InsideFootball.com. Retrieved 2007-01-17.
  7. ^ http://www.bigblueview.com/story/2007/9/1/12522/67849
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