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Mákina

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Title: Mákina  
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Subject: Hardcore (electronic dance music genre), Jumpstyle, Newton (band), Streamline (song), Kambi Muru
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Mákina

Mákina is a subgenre of hardcore techno, originating in Spain. Similar to UK hardcore, it includes elements of bouncy techno and hardtrance. The tempo ranges from 150 to 180 BPM.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Early 1990s: origins 1.1
    • Mid-1990s: breakthrough and success 1.2
  • References 2

History

Early 1990s: origins

Dance music in Spain became prominent in 1988 with the rise of acid house. Mákina followed this trend and has its origins in the early 1990s in Valencia, Spain.[1] Derived from another style called Bakalao, which was in reality the local name given to an association of electronic dance music played together with pop and rock tunes in Valencian clubs in the second half of the 1980s.[2][3]

Mid-1990s: breakthrough and success

The genre gained prominence in 1991 when Spanish producer Chimo Bayo released his single, "Asi Me Gusta A Mi (X-Ta Si, X-Ta No)". The song was a success throughout Europe and the genre soon gained prominence. The genre became extremely popular throughout Spain from 1995 to 1997, as many Mákina oriented singles reached number one on the Spanish Singles Chart. Spanish mákina group EX-3 had two number-one singles, "Extres" and "Ex-P-Cial" in 1995 and 1996, respectively.[4] Perhaps the most recognized mákina single in the United States is "Streamline" by Newton, which was popularized by a 2006 Pepsi commercial starring Jimmy Fallon.

References

  1. ^ Carles Feixa; Carmen Costa; Joan Pallarés (2001). From okupas to makineros: citizenship and youth cultures in Spain. Council of Europe. p. 297. 
  2. ^ Damien Simonis (15 March 2007). Spain. Lonely Planet. p. 69.  
  3. ^ Loretta Chilcoat; Reuben Acciano (15 February 2005). Western Europe. Lonely Planet. p. 30.  
  4. ^ Salaverri, Fernando (September 2005). Sólo éxitos: año a año, 1959–2002 (1st ed.). Spain: Fundación Autor-SGAE.  
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