World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article
 

Mozilla Foundation

Mozilla Foundation
Mozilla wordmark
Founded July 15, 2003 (2003-07-15)
Founder Mozilla Organization
Type 501(c)(3)
Focus Internet
Location
Origins Mozilla Organization
Products Mozilla Firefox web browser
Mozilla Thunderbird e-mail client
Mozilla Firefox OS mobile operating system
List of Mozilla Foundation products
Key people

Mitchell Baker
(Executive Chairwoman)

Mark Surman
(Executive director)
Subsidiaries Mozilla Corporation
Mozilla Messaging
Revenue
$311 million (2012)[1]
Website mozilla.org

The Mozilla Foundation is a Silicon Valley city of Mountain View, California, United States.

The Mozilla Foundation describes itself as "a non-profit organization that promotes openness, innovation and participation on the Internet."[2] The Mozilla Foundation is guided by the Mozilla Manifesto, which lists 10 principles which Mozilla believes "are critical for the Internet to continue to benefit the public good as well as commercial aspects of life."[3]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Subsidiaries 2
    • Mozilla Corporation 2.1
    • Mozilla China 2.2
  • Financing 3
  • People 4
  • Donations 5
  • See also 6
  • Notes 7
  • References 8
  • External links 9

History

Entrance to the Mountain View office which is home to both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation
Former office next to the Googleplex shared by both the Mozilla Foundation and the Mozilla Corporation until July 2009

On February 23, 1998,

  • About the Mozilla Foundation
  • 2005 presentation about the Mozilla Foundation
  • Press release about the creation of the Mozilla Foundation
  • Meeting Minutes from the Weekly Mozilla call
  • Mozilla Labs
  • Mozilla Research

External links

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^ a b
  8. ^ 谋智网络是Mozilla Corporation在中国的全资子公司,我们是Mozilla大家庭中非常重要的一份子——火狐浏览器 | 职业机会
  9. ^
  10. ^
  11. ^
  12. ^
  13. ^
  14. ^
  15. ^
  16. ^
  17. ^
  18. ^
  19. ^

Notes

See also

At the end of 2010, the Mozilla Foundation partnered with Knoxville Zoo in an effort to raise awareness about endangered red pandas. Two red panda (a.k.a. Firefox) cubs born at the Knoxville Zoo have officially become a part of the Mozilla community. The cubs are named Spark and Ember by online voters and Mozilla broadcast a 24-hour live video stream of the cubs for several months.[16][17][18][19]

In 2006, after a request from Theo de Raadt of OpenBSD for funding from corporate entities which make a profit through the use of OpenSSH in their packaged distributions, the Mozilla Foundation donated US$10,000 to de Raadt and OpenBSD for OpenSSH development. The funds donated came from money earned through the income provided by Google. While the target of this request were corporations such as Cisco, IBM, HP, and Red Hat (which all sell operating systems containing OpenSSH but have not donated to its continued development before), the Mozilla Foundation found that without OpenSSH, much of the work done by developers would be through insecure and unsafe methods and thus gave the funds as a thank you.[15]

Donations

The Mozilla project has traditionally been overseen by a committee known as mozilla.org staff; some individuals on that committee later became Foundation or Corporation board members or employees.

The Mozilla Corporation also has a number of employees, many of whom worked for the foundation before the establishment of the corporation.

Mark Surman is the foundation's executive director.

Originally, Christopher Blizzard had a seat on the board, but he moved to the Mozilla Corporation Board of Directors when it was established; Joichi Ito joined the Mozilla Foundation board at that time. Bob Lisbonne and Carl Malamud were elected to the board in October 2006.

The Mozilla Foundation Board of Directors has six members:[14]

People

From 2004 to 2014, the foundation had a deal with [7] However, it is also to be noted that Yahoo! Search is a merely a front-end to Microsoft's search engine Bing, and Microsoft takes a 12% cut of all revenue from the search business per the deal.[13] Due to Mozilla's financial release timetables, the results of the Yahoo! contract will not be public until November 2016.

In 2006, the Mozilla Foundation received US$66.8 million in revenues, of which US$61.5 million is attributed to "search royalties" from Google.[9]

Initial funding in 2003 came from AOL, which donated US$2 million, and from Mitch Kapor who donated US$300,000. The group has tax-exempt status under section 501(c)(3) of the U.S. tax code, though the Mozilla Corporation subsidiary is taxable.

The Mozilla Foundation is funded by donations and "search royalties".

Financing

Beijing Mozilla Online Ltd (Chinese: 北京谋智网络技术有限公司), a.k.a. Mozilla China, is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Mozilla Corporation[8] with its headquarters in Beijing.

Mozilla China

On August 3, 2005, the Mozilla Foundation announced the creation of [7] making Yahoo Search the default search experience for Firefox in the U.S. Yandex Search is the default for Firefox in Russia and Baidu continues its role as the default in China.

Mozilla Corporation

Subsidiaries

With the formation of the Mozilla Corporation, the Mozilla Foundation delegated all their development and business-related activities to the new subsidiary. The Mozilla Foundation now focuses on its Webmaker initiative (which aims to raise the level of users' Web Literacy) as well as on governance and policy issues. The Mozilla Foundation owns the Mozilla trademarks and other intellectual property, which it licenses to the Mozilla Corporation. It also controls the Mozilla source code repository and decides who is allowed to check code in.

Initially, the remit of the Mozilla Foundation grew to become much wider than that of mozilla.org, with the organization taking on many tasks that were traditionally left to Netscape and other vendors of Mozilla technology. As part of a wider move to target end-users, the foundation made deals with commercial companies to sell CDs containing Mozilla software and provide telephone support. In both cases, the group chose the same suppliers as Netscape for these services. The Mozilla Foundation also became more assertive over its intellectual property, with policies put in place for the use of Mozilla trademarks and logos. New projects such as marketing were also started.

[5]

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.