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Norwegian rigsdaler

The rigsdaler was the unit of currency used in Norway until 1816 and in Denmark until 1873. The similarly named Reichsthaler, riksdaler and rijksdaalder were used in Germany and Austria-Hungary, Sweden and the Netherlands, respectively.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Coins 2
  • Banknotes 3
  • References 4

History

During the political union between Denmark and Norway, Danish currency circulated alongside Norwegian. Norway itself issued currency denominated in two different rigsdaler, the rigsdaler courant and the rigsdaler specie, with 96 skilling to the rigsdaler courant and 120 skilling to the rigsdaler specie.

In 1816, following the establishment of the union between Sweden and Norway, the rigsdaler specie was renamed the speciedaler and became the standard unit of currency in Norway.

Coins

In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, coins were issued in denominations of 1, 2, 4, 8 and 24 skilling, 115, 15, ⅓, ½, ⅔ and 1 rigsdaler specie.

Banknotes

In 1695, government notes were issued for 10, 20, 25, 50 and 100 rigsdaler (spelt rixdaler). In 1807, notes were reintroduced by the government, in denominations of 1, 5,10 and 100 rigsdaler courant, with 12 skilling notes added in 1810. In 1813, Norges Rigsbanken began issuing notes. Denominations were for 3, 6, 8 and 16 skilling, ½, 1, 5, 15, 25, 50 and 100 rigsdaler.

References

  • Krause, Chester L., and Clifford Mishler (1991).  
  • Pick, Albert (1994).  
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