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One Way Ticket (Because I Can)

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Title: One Way Ticket (Because I Can)  
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Language: English
Subject: LeAnn Rimes, 1996 in country music, Blue (LeAnn Rimes album), Holiday in Your Heart, The Best of LeAnn Rimes, Judy Rodman, Something's Gotta Give (LeAnn Rimes song)
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One Way Ticket (Because I Can)

"One Way Ticket (Because I Can)"
B-side Unchained Melody
Released September 28, 1996
Format CD single
Recorded 1996
Genre Country, pop
Length 3:42
Label Curb
Writer(s) Keith Hinton
Judy Rodman
Producer Chuck Howard
Wilbur C. Rimes
LeAnn Rimes singles chronology

"Hurt Me"
(1996)
"One Way Ticket (Because I Can)"
(1996)
"Unchained Melody"
(1997)

"One Way Ticket (Because I Can)" or simply "One Way Ticket"[1] is the title of a song written by Judy Rodman and Keith Hinton, and recorded by American country music artist LeAnn Rimes. It was released in September 1996 as the third single from the album Blue. The single made her the fourth teen-aged country music act to score a Number One single on the U.S. Billboard country music charts. It is also her only Number One country hit.

According to one of her producers, Rimes sang the song in only one take.[2]

Critical reception

A review by Billboard stated "Less retro and traditional than her previous hit singles, Rimes' outing is a vibrant, uptempo number."[3]

Track listing

CD single
  1. One Way Ticket (Because I Can) - 3:42
  2. Unchained Melody - 3:51

Chart performance

Chart (1996-1997) Peak
position
Canada Country Tracks (RPM)[4] 4
US Hot Country Songs (Billboard)[5] 1

Year-end charts

Chart (1997) Position
Canada Country Tracks (RPM)[6] 75
US Country Songs (Billboard)[7] 74

References

External links

Preceded by
"Little Bitty"
by Alan Jackson
Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks
number-one single

December 28, 1996-January 4, 1997
Succeeded by
"Nobody Knows"
by Kevin Sharp
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