World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Philippikos

Article Id: WHEBN0019220746
Reproduction Date:

Title: Philippikos  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Anastasios II, Justinian II, Kyros of Constantinople, John VI of Constantinople
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Philippikos

"Philippicus" redirects here. For the 6th-century Byzantine general, see Philippicus (general).
"Bardanes" redirects here. For the 9th-century Byzantine general and rebel, see Bardanes Tourkos. For the moth, see Bardanes (moth).
Philippikos
Emperor of the Byzantine Empire
A coin of Philippikos
Reign 711– 713
Died 713
Predecessor Justinian II
Successor Anastasius II
Father Nikephorus

Philippikos or Philippicus (Greek: Φιλιππικός) was Emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 711 to 713.

Biography

Philippicus was originally named Bardanes (Greek: Βαρδάνης, Vardanis; Armenian: Վարդան, Vardan); he was the son of the patrician Nikephorus, who was of Armenian extraction from an Armenian colony in Pergamum.[1]

Relying on the support of the Monothelite party, he made some pretensions to the throne on the outbreak of the first great rebellion against Emperor Justinian II; these led to his relegation to Cephalonia by Tiberius Apsimarus, and subsequently to his banishment to Cherson by order of Justinian. Here Bardanes, taking the name of Philippicus, successfully incited the inhabitants to revolt with the help of the Khazars. The successful rebels seized Constantinople, and Justinian fled (only to be assassinated soon afterward, unable to rally substantial support in the provinces); Philippikos took the throne.

Reign

Among his first acts were the deposition of the orthodox patriarch Cyrus of Constantinople, in favour of John VI, a member of his own sect, and the summoning of a conciliabulum of Eastern bishops, which abolished the canons of the Sixth Ecumenical Council. In response the Roman Church refused to recognize the new Emperor and his patriarch. Meanwhile Tervel of Bulgaria plundered up to the walls of Constantinople in 712. When Philippicus transferred an army from the Opsikion theme to police the Balkans, the Umayyad Caliphate under Al-Walid I made inroads across the weakened defenses of Asia Minor.

In late May 713 the Opsikion troops rebelled in Thrace. Several of their officers penetrated the city and blinded Philippicus on June 3, 713 while he was at a public bathhouse.[2] He was succeeded for a short while by his principal secretary, Artemius, who was raised to the purple as Emperor Anastasius II.

Bibliography

Notes
References

Further reading

External links

Philippikos Bardanes
Years of Anarchy
Born:  ? Died: 714
Regnal titles
Preceded by
Justinian II
Byzantine Emperor
711–713
Succeeded by
Anastasius II
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.