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Quebec general election, 1985

Quebec general election, 1985

December 2, 1985

122 seats in the 33rd National Assembly of Quebec
62 seats were needed for a majority
Turnout 75.69%
  First party Second party
  PQ
Leader Robert Bourassa Pierre-Marc Johnson
Party Liberal Parti Québécois
Leader since October 15, 1983 September 29, 1985
Leader's seat Bertrand (lost re-election) Anjou
Last election 42 seats, 46.07% 80 seats, 49.26%
Seats won 99 23
Seat change +57 -57
Popular vote 1,910,307 1,320,008
Percentage 55.99% 38.69%
Swing +9.92% -10.57%

Premier before election

Pierre-Marc Johnson
Parti Québécois

Premier-designate

Robert Bourassa
Liberal

The Quebec general election of 1985 was held on December 2, 1985, to elect members of the National Assembly of the Province of Quebec, Canada. The Quebec Liberal Party, led by former premier Robert Bourassa, defeated the incumbent Parti Québécois, led by premier Pierre-Marc Johnson.

This election marked the comeback of Robert Bourassa, whose political career had been thought to be over after losing the 1976 general election and resigning as Liberal leader. However, Bourassa personally failed to win his own seat in the Bertrand electoral district, and had to run in a by-election one month later in the safe Saint-Laurent electoral district. The 1985 Quebec general election result produced by far the largest majority of any Canadian legislative election (both in terms of the number of seats and percentage of seats) by a winning party whose leader failed to win his own seat.

Johnson, son of former Union Nationale premier Daniel Johnson, Sr. was unable to revive the PQ's fortune after he succeeded René Lévesque as party leader and premier. Pierre-Marc's brother, Daniel Johnson, Jr, later became leader of the Liberal Party and briefly served as premier.

This election was the last contested by the Union Nationale. It only ran candidates in 19 ridings, none of whom came close to being elected. The party would be wound up by election authorities in 1989.

Contents

  • Results 1
  • See also 2
  • External links 3
  • References 4

Results

The overall results were:[1]

Party Party leader # of
candidates
Seats Popular vote
1981 Elected % Change # % % Change
Liberal Robert Bourassa 122 42 99 +135.7% 1,910,307 55.99% +9.92%
Parti Québécois Pierre-Marc Johnson 122 80 23 -71.3% 1,320,008 38.69% -10.57%
     New Democratic Jean-Paul Harney 90 * - * 82,588 2.42% *
     Progressive Conservative André Asselin 48 * - * 35,210 1.03% *
     Parti indépendantiste Denis Monière 39 * - * 15,423 0.45% *
     Christian Socialist Jacques Paquette 103 * - * 11,712 0.34% *
Union Nationale André Léveillé 19 - - - 7,759 0.23% -3.77%
Green   10 * - * 4,613 0.14% *
     Humanist   17 * - * 3,050 0.09% *
Commonwealth of Canada   28 * - * 2,240 0.07% *
Socialist Movement Roger Deslauriers 10 * - * 1,809 0.05% *
     United Social Credit Jean-Paul Poulin 12 - - - 1,650 0.05% +0.01%
Communist Sam Walsh 10 - - - 834 0.02% -
     Independents 22 - - - 9,380 0.28% +0.16%
     No designation 14 - - - 5,024 0.15%  
Total 666 122 122 - 3,411,607 100%  

Note:

* Party did not nominate candidates in the previous election.

Vote share
PLQ
  
55.99%
PQ
  
38.69%
NDP
  
2.42%
PC
  
1.03%
Others
  
1.86%

See also

External links

  • CBC TV video clip
  • Results by party (total votes and seats won)
  • Results for all ridings

References

  1. ^ "Résultats officiels par parti politique pour l'ensemble des circonscriptions". Directeur général des élections du Québec. Retrieved 2012-01-31. 
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