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Stacey Dales

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Title: Stacey Dales  
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Subject: List of NFL draft broadcasters, ESPN College Football broadcast teams, Canada Basketball, ESPN College Basketball broadcast teams, NFL Network
Collection: 1979 Births, Basketball People from Ontario, Basketball Players at the 2000 Summer Olympics, Canadian Expatriate Basketball People in the United States, Canadian Expatriates in the United States, Canadian Sports Announcers, Canadian Women's Basketball Players, Chicago Sky Players, College Basketball Announcers in the United States, College Football Announcers, Living People, National Football League Announcers, Oklahoma Sooners Women's Basketball Players, Olympic Basketball Players of Canada, People from Brockville, People from Collingwood, Ontario, Point Guards, Washington Mystics Players, Women Sports Announcers, Women's College Basketball Announcers in the United States
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Stacey Dales

Stacey Dales in 2014

Stacey Dales (born September 5, 1979) is a former Canadian basketball player and a current host on the NFL Network. Dales was born in Collingwood, Ontario, and raised in Brockville, Ontario.

Contents

  • Basketball 1
  • Oklahoma statistics 2
  • WNBA Statistics 3
  • Television 4
  • Family 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Basketball

She attended the University of Oklahoma, and was a first team All-American in 2001 and 2002. She was named the 2001 and 2002 Big 12 Conference Player of the Year and is the Big 12 all-time career assist leader (764). In 2002, she was the all-sports Academic All-American of the Year.[1] She was the first Oklahoma player to record 1,700 points, 600 rebounds and 700 assists. During her senior year she led the Sooners to the NCAA Championship game where they lost to Connecticut. After leaving Oklahoma that year, she went by the married name "Dales-Schuman," but has used only "Dales" since divorcing her husband during her year off from pro ball.

Dales was drafted third overall in 2002 by the Washington Mystics, the highest pick ever for a Canadian. That year she was named to the All-Star team as a replacement. When she was with Washington, she was diagnosed with Raynaud's phenomenon in her hands. In 2004 she announced her retirement from the league for the first time.

After a one-year retirement, she joined the Chicago Sky, who picked her in the expansion draft of 2006 after Washington left her unprotected. On April 5, 2008, Dales announced her retirement from the WNBA for the second time.

Oklahoma statistics

Source[2]

Year Team GP Points FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
1998-99 Oklahoma 29 346 39.0 0.3 0.7 6.9 5.2 1.3 0.6 11.9
1999-00 Oklahoma 33 420 41.2 35.2 61.7 5.1 5.8 1.9 0.3 12.7
2000-01 Oklahoma 34 543 47.6 32.6 66.0 5.1 7.3 2.4 0.1 16.0
2001-02 Oklahoma 36 611 47.6 38.7 78.6 5.0 4.9 1.8 0.3 17.0
Career Oklahoma 132 1920 44.4 34.8 68.7 5.5 5.8 1.9 0.3 14.5

WNBA Statistics

She played Guard-Forward. He height is 6' ft 0", 183 cm and playing weight 155 lbs. She played for the Washington Mystics and Chicago Sky. She is ranked 4th in the WNBA for 3-pointers made (62) and 2nd in 3-point attempts (201) in 2007.

Television

Dales served as a men's and women's college basketball analyst, as well as a sideline reporter for college football games, on ESPN. She left ESPN in November 2008 after a contract dispute in which she was denied first class flight privileges during cutbacks.[3]

On August 31, 2009 the NFL Network announced that Dales would be co-host of Gameday Morning. For the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Dales was hired by Universal Sports to work as a correspondent.

Family

Her brother Burke played 10 seasons in the Canadian Football League, retiring in 2014. Her cousin, Jason Arnott, played 18 seasons in the NHL, retiring in 2013.

References

  1. ^ "ESPN The Magazine Annual Acacemic All-America® of the Year Recipients" (PDF).  
  2. ^ "Women's Basketball Player stats". NCAA. Retrieved 3 October 2015. 
  3. ^ http://deadspin.com/5153172/source-confirms-stacey-dales-quit-espn-because-she-wouldnt-fly-coach

External links

  • Player Profile
  • Interview with The Oklahoman
  • Interview with New York Times
  • Involvement in animal welfare
  • Dales retires from the WNBA
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