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1978 In Aviation

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1978 In Aviation

Years in aviation: 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s
Years: 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1978:

Contents

  • Events 1
    • January 1.1
    • February 1.2
    • March 1.3
    • April 1.4
    • May 1.5
    • June 1.6
    • July 1.7
    • August 1.8
    • September 1.9
    • October 1.10
    • November 1.11
    • December 1.12
  • First flights 2
    • January 2.1
    • February 2.2
    • March 2.3
    • April 2.4
    • June 2.5
    • July 2.6
    • August 2.7
    • September 2.8
    • November 2.9
    • December 2.10
  • Entered service 3
    • January 3.1
    • April 3.2
    • June 3.3
    • August 3.4
  • Retirements 4
    • June 4.1
  • References 5

Events

January

February

March

April

May

  • National Airlines inaugurates nonstop service from Florida to both Frankfurt-am-Main, West Germany, and Amsterdam, the Netherlands.[4]
  • May 8 – The National Airlines Boeing 727-235 Donna, operating as Flight 193, crashes into Escambia Bay while on descent to Pensacola, Florida, killing three of the 58 people on board and injuring 11 of the 55 survivors.
  • May 16–27 – Eighteen U.S. Air Force C-141 Starlifters fly 32 missions to transport 850 short tons (771 metric tons) of cargo and 125 passengers to Zaire in support of French Foreign Legion troops and Belgian paratroopers deploying there to oppose the Shaba II invasion of the Zairian province of Shaba by a separatist movement.[5]
  • May 19
    • A Belgian force of 1,171 paratroopers arrives at Kamina, Zaire, in Belgian aircraft to intervene in the Shaba II crisis.[6]
    • Paratroopers of the French Foreign Legion jump into [6]
  • May 20
    • Belgian troops land unopposed the airfield at Kolwezi after Zairian ground forces have seized it. Additional French Foreign Legion paratroopers jump over Kolwezi later in the day.[6]
    • McDonnell Douglas delivers its 5,000th F-4 Phantom II aircraft, 20 years after the first flight of the prototype.
  • May 23 – Tu-144D experienced an in-flight failure during a pre-delivery test flight, and crash-landed with crew fatalities.
  • May 24 – Barbara Ann Oswald hijacks a St. Louis, Missouri-based charter helicopter and orders its pilot, Allen Barklage, to fly it to United States Penitentiary, Marion, in Marion, Illinois, so that her husband, Garrett B. Trapnell – imprisoned there for a 1972 airliner hijacking – can escape. Barklage wrestles Oswald‍ '​s gun from her as he lands the helicopter in the prison yard and shoots her to death. In December, her daughter Robin Oswald will hijack an airliner in an unsuccessful attempt to get Trapnell released.
  • May 31 – U.S. Air Force C-141 Starlifter aircraft begin to transport French and Belgian troops as they withdraw from their intervention in the Shaba II affair in Zaire. Simultaneously, the C-141s begin airlift support for troops from Gabon, Ivory Coast, Morocco, Senegal, and Togo as they deploy into Shaba on peacekeeping duties.[6]

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

First flights

January

February

March

April

June

July

August

September

November

December

Entered service

January

April

June

August

Retirements

June

References

  1. ^ Mondey, David, ed., The Complete Illustrated History of the World‍ '​s Aircraft, Secaucus, New Jersey: Chartwell Books, Inc., 1983, ISBN 0-89009-771-2, p. 27.
  2. ^ Flickr: Tiger Moth
  3. ^ [1]
  4. ^ a b Organization of Former Stewardesses and Flight Attendants with the Original National Airlines.National Airlines history, at Nationalsundowners.com, the
  5. ^ Mets, David R., Land-Based Air Power in Third World Crises, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Air University Press, July 1986, no ISBN number, pp. 133-134.
  6. ^ a b c d Mets, David R., Land-Based Air Power in Third World Crises, Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama: Air University Press, July 1986, no ISBN number, p. 134.
  7. ^ Holland, Douglas (16 August 2006). "The Air Links between Gatwick and Heathrow" (PDF). p. 4. Retrieved 28 December 2012. 
  8. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 314.
  9. ^ Thetford, Owen, British Naval Aircraft Since 1912, Sixth Edition, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1991, ISBN 1-55750-076-2, p. 27.
  10. ^ McCabe, Scott, "Crime History: 'Goodfellas' Make Off With $5.8M in Lufthansa Heist", Washington Examiner, Sunday, December 11, 2011, Page 6.
  11. ^ a b Associated Press, "," washingtonpost.com, January 24, 2014, 6:47 a.m.
  12. ^ Mondey, David, ed., The Complete Illustrated History of the World‍ '​s Aircraft, Secaucus, New Jersey: Chartwell Books, Inc., 1978, ISBN 0-89009-771-2, p. 76.
  13. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, p. 321.
  14. ^ Angelucci, Enzo, The American Fighter: The Definitive Guide to American Fighter Aircraft From 1917 to the Present, New York: Orion Books, 1987, ISBN 0-517-56588-9, p. 102.
  15. ^ Bach, Martin, Boeing 367 Stratofreighter, Boeing 377 Stratocruiser, Aero Spacelines Guppies, NARA Verlag, Allershausen 1996, ISBN 3-925671-18-8, p. 31.
  16. ^ Knott, Robert C., Attack From the Sky: Naval Air Operations in the Korean War, Washington, D.C.: Department of the Navy Naval Historical Center, 2004, ISBN 0-945274-52-1, p. 188.
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