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1989 In Aviation

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Title: 1989 In Aviation  
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Subject: Aviation/Anniversaries/January 4, Aviation/Anniversaries/December 12, 1992 in aviation, 1991 in aviation, 1990 in aviation
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1989 In Aviation

Years in aviation: 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992
Centuries: 19th century · 20th century · 21st century
Decades: 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s
Years: 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992

This is a list of aviation-related events from 1989:

Contents

  • Events 1
    • January 1.1
    • February 1.2
    • March 1.3
    • April 1.4
    • May 1.5
    • June 1.6
    • July 1.7
    • August 1.8
    • September 1.9
    • October 1.10
    • November 1.11
    • December 1.12
  • First flights 2
    • January 2.1
    • March 2.2
    • April 2.3
    • May 2.4
    • June 2.5
    • July 2.6
    • October 2.7
    • December 2.8
  • Entered service 3
  • References 4

Events

January

February

March

April

May

  • May 23 – First flight of the second and last Grumman X-29, American experimental aircraft that tested a forward-swept wing, canard control surfaces, and other novel aircraft technologies.

June

July

  • July 4 – Crash of an unmanned MiG-23 in Kortrijk, Belgium. The pilot had believed he was experiencing an engine failure shortly after take-off from the Soviet airbase near Kolobzreg, Poland and had ejected, while the aircraft continued on autopilot for 900 km (559 miles), until running out of fuel. One 18-year-old man on the ground was killed in the crash.[5]
  • July 16 – European air traffic is halted due to industrial action by French air traffic controllers.
  • July 19 – United Airlines Flight 232, a Douglas DC-10, suffers decompression in and catastrophic failure of its tail-mounted engine, knocking out all its flight controls. In what is considered a prime example of successful crew resource management, the plane‍ '​s crew manages to use engine throttles to fly the plane to Sioux City, Iowa, where it crashes on landing. Although 111 of the people on board die, the crew is credited with saving the other 185 by coaxing the aircraft to Sioux City..

August

September

October

November

December

First flights

January

March

April

May

June

July

October

December

Entered service

References

  1. ^ Polmar, Norman, "Historic Aircraft: A Premier Fighter," Naval History, April 2012, p. 14.
  2. ^ McCabe, Scott, "Crime History: TV Journalists Try to Plant Fake Bombs on Planes," The Washington Examiner, January 4, 2013, p. 8.
  3. ^ a b Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 58.
  4. ^ Crickmore, Paul F. "Lockheed's Blackbirds: A-12, YF-12 and SR-71", Wings of Fame, Volume 8, AIRtime Publishing Inc., Westport, Connecticut, 1997, ISBN 1-880588-23-4, page 93.
  5. ^ Incident summary at Eastern Wings
  6. ^ Chant, Chris, The World‍ '​s Great Bombers, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 2000, ISBN 0-7607-2012-6, p. 172.
  7. ^ Project: Da Vinci III
  8. ^ Associated Press, "Carriers Do Better On Arrival Time, Liggage," The Washington Post, August 10, 2012, p. A9.
  9. ^ Lambert 1990, p. 289.
  10. ^ Lambert 1990, p. 343.
  11. ^ Donald, David, ed., The Complete Encyclopedia of World Aircraft, New York: Barnes & Noble Books, 1997, ISBN 0-7607-0592-5, p. 118.
  12. ^ a b c d e f Lambert 1990, p. [31].
  13. ^ Lambert 1990, p. [33].
  • Lambert, Mark. Jane's All The World's Aircraft 1990–1991. Coulsdon, UK: Jane's Defence Data, 1990. ISBN 0-7106-0908-6.
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