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42nd Primetime Emmy Awards

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Title: 42nd Primetime Emmy Awards  
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Subject: The Incident (1990 film), List of accolades received by David Lynch, 43rd Primetime Emmy Awards, 41st Primetime Emmy Awards, Twin Peaks
Collection: 1990 Television Awards, Primetime Emmy Award Ceremonies
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42nd Primetime Emmy Awards

42nd Primetime Emmy Awards
Date
  • September 16, 1990 (Ceremony)
  • September 15 (Creative Arts Awards)
Location Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California
Host Candice Bergen[1]
Jay Leno[1]
Jane Pauley[2]
Television/Radio coverage
Network Fox
41st Primetime Emmy Awards 43rd >

The 42nd Primetime Emmy Awards were held on September 16, 1990. The ceremony was broadcast on Fox, from the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, Pasadena, California. Two networks, The Family Channel and The Disney Channel received their first major nominations.

In its second season Murphy Brown won the Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series, and two other major awards on the night. Defending champion Cheers received the most major nominations for a comedy series with 11. Newhart finished its series run with 21 major nominations, but not a single win. On the drama side L.A. Law won Outstanding Drama Series for the third time in four years. It also won three major awards on the night, and received the most major nominations for a drama with 11.

This ceremony was remembered for an anomaly that took place, as three major categories resulted in ties, the most ever for one ceremony.

A clip of The Simpsons presenting the award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series can be seen on the second season DVD boxset as a special feature.

Contents

  • Winners and Nominees 1
    • Programs 1.1
    • Acting 1.2
      • Lead performances 1.2.1
      • Supporting performances 1.2.2
      • Guest performances 1.2.3
    • Directing 1.3
    • Writing 1.4
  • Most major nominations 2
  • Most major awards 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Winners and Nominees

[3]

Programs

Outstanding Comedy Series Outstanding Drama Series
Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Series Outstanding Variety, Music or Comedy Special
Outstanding Drama/Comedy Special Outstanding Miniseries

Acting

Lead performances

Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Lead Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Lead Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Supporting performances

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series
Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or a Special Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or a Special

Guest performances

Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Comedy Series
  • Jay Thomas as Jerry Gold on Murphy Brown, (Episode: "Heart of Gold"), (CBS)
    • David Huddleston as Granpa Arnold on The Wonder Years, (Episode: "The Powers That Be"), (ABC)
    • Darren McGavin as Max Weinstock on Murphy Brown, (Episode: "Brown Like Me"), (CBS)
    • Jerry Orbach as Glen on The Golden Girls, (Episode: "Cheaters"), (NBC)
    • Dick Van Dyke as Ken on The Golden Girls, (Episode: "Love Under The Big Top"), (NBC)
Outstanding Guest Actor in a Drama Series Outstanding Guest Actress in a Drama Series

Directing

Outstanding Directing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Directing in a Drama Series
  • Michael Dinner, for The Wonder Years, (Episode: "Good-Bye"), (ABC)
    • James Burrows for Cheers, (Episode: "The Improbable Dream, Part I"), (NBC)
    • Terry Hughes, for The Golden Girls, (Episode: "Triple Play"), (NBC)
    • Barnet Kellman for Murphy Brown, (Episode: "Brown Like Me"), (CBS)
    • Harry Thomason for Designing Women, (Episode: "They Shoot Fat Women, Don't They?"), (CBS)
    • Hugh Wilson for The Famous Teddy Z, (Episode: "Pilot"), (CBS)
Outstanding Directing in a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Directing in a Miniseries or a Special

Writing

Outstanding Writing in a Comedy Series Outstanding Writing in a Drama Series
  • Bob Brush for The Wonder Years, (Episode: "Good-Bye"), (ABC)
    • Mark Egan, Mark Solomon, Bob Bendetson for Newhart, (Episode: "The Last Newhart"), (CBS)
    • Diane English for Murphy Brown, (Episode: "Brown Like Me"), (CBS)
    • Ken Levine, David Isaacs for Cheers, (Episode: "Death Takes a Holiday on Ice"), (NBC)
    • Hugh Wilson for The Famous Teddy Z, (Episode: "Pilot"), (CBS)
Outstanding Writing in a Variety or Music Program Outstanding Writing in a Miniseries or a Special
  • The Tracey Ullman Show, (Episode: "I Hate Paris"), (Fox)
  • Billy Crystal: Midnight Train to Moscow, (HBO)
    • In Living Color, (Episode: "Pilot"), (Fox)
    • Saturday Night Live, (NBC)
    • Late Night with David Letterman, (Episode: "8th Anniversary Special"), (NBC)

Most major nominations

By network [note 1]
  • NBC / ABC – 47
  • CBS – 35
  • HBO – 11
By program
  • Cheers (NBC) / L.A. Law (NBC) – 11
  • Murphy Brown (CBS) – 9
  • thirtysomething (ABC) – 8
  • Twin Peaks (ABC) – 7
  • The Golden Girls (NBC) – 6

Most major awards

By network [note 1]
  • ABC – 10
  • CBS – 9
  • NBC – 8
  • HBO – 3
  • Fox – 2
By program
  • L.A. Law (NBC) / Murphy Brown (CBS) – 3
  • Age-Old Friends (ABC) / Caroline? (CBS) / Cheers (NBC) / Columbo (ABC) / thirtysomething (ABC) / The Wonder Years (ABC) – 2
Notes
  1. ^ a b "Major" constitutes the categories listed above: Program, Acting, Directing, and Writing. Does not include the technical categories.

References

  1. ^ a b Editors. "The 42nd Annual Primetime Emmy Awards (1990 TV Special)—Connections". IMDb. Retrieved 2013-12-29. 
  2. ^ Editors. "Filmography by type for Jane Pauley". IMDb. Retrieved 2013-12-29. 
  3. ^ "1990 Primetime Emmy Awards".  

External links

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