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Ad hoc

Ad hoc is a network protocol, or a purpose-specific equation. Ad hoc can also mean makeshift solutions, shifting contexts to create new meanings, inadequate planning, or improvised events.

According to The Chicago Manual of Style, familiar Latin phrases that are listed in Merriam-Webster, such as "ad hoc", should not be italicized.[1][2]

Contents

  • Ad hoc hypothesis 1
  • Ad hoc military 2
  • Ad hoc networking 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • Further reading 6
  • External links 7

Ad hoc hypothesis

In science and philosophy, ad hoc means the addition of extraneous hypotheses to a theory to save it from being falsified. Ad hoc hypotheses compensate for anomalies not anticipated by the theory in its unmodified form. Scientists are often skeptical of theories that rely on frequent, unsupported adjustments to sustain them. Ad hoc hypotheses are often characteristic of pseudoscientific subjects such as homeopathy.[3]

Ad hoc military

In military, ad hoc units are created during unpredictable situations, when the cooperation between different units is needed for fast action.

Ad hoc networking

The term ad hoc networking typically refers to a system of network elements that combine to form a network requiring little or no planning.

See also

References

  1. ^ http://grammarpartyblog.com/2012/02/23/when-to-italicize-foreign-words-and-phrases/
  2. ^ http://www.economist.com/style-guide/italics
  3. ^ Carroll, Robert T. (23 February 2012), "Ad hoc hypothesis",  

Further reading

  • Howard, R. (2002), Smart Mobs: the Next Social Revolution, Perseus 

External links

  • The dictionary definition of ad hoc at Wiktionary
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