World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Air travel

Article Id: WHEBN0000449952
Reproduction Date:

Title: Air travel  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Tourism in the United States, Computer reservations system, Economy class, Aircraft cabin, Civil aviation
Collection: Civil Aviation, Types of Travel
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Air travel

A Eurocopter AS350B helicopter in flight

Air travel is a form of travel in vehicles such as airplanes, helicopters, hot air balloons, blimps, gliders, hang gliding, parachuting, or anything else that can sustain flight.[1] Use of air travel has greatly increased in recent decades - worldwide it doubled between the mid-1980s and the year 2000.[2]

Contents

  • Domestic and international flights 1
  • Air travel 2
  • Health effects 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Domestic and international flights

Air travel can be separated into two general classifications: national/domestic and international flights. Flights from one point to another within the same country are called domestic flights. Flights from a point in one country to a point within a different country are known as international flights.

Air travel

A hot air balloon in flight

Travel class on an airplane is usually split into a two, three or four class model sevens. US Domestic flights usually have two classes: Economy Class and a Domestic First Class partitioned into cabins. International flights may have up to four classes: Economy Class; Premium Economy; Business Class or Club Class; and First Class.

Most air travel starts and ends at a commercial airport. The typical procedure is check-in; border control; airport security baggage and passenger check before entering the gate; boarding; flying; and pick-up of luggage and - limited to international flights - another border control at the host country's border.

Health effects

During flight, the aircraft cabin pressure is usually maintained at the equivalent of 6,000–8,000 ft (1,829–2,438 m) above sea level. Most healthy travelers will not notice any effects. However, for travelers with cardiopulmonary diseases (especially those who normally require supplemental oxygen), cerebrovascular disease, anemia, or sickle cell disease, conditions in an aircraft can exacerbate underlying medical conditions. Aircraft cabin air is typically dry, usually 10%–20% humidity, which can cause dryness of the mucous membranes of the eyes and airways.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Aviation." Encyclopædia Britannica. Accessed June 2011.
  2. ^ http://www.worldwatch.org/system/files/EWP159.pdf
  3. ^ http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2014/chapter-6-conveyance-and-transportation-issues/air-travel

External links

  • Chasing the Sun - History of commercial aviation, from PBS


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.