World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Ana Fidelia Quirot

 

Ana Fidelia Quirot

Ana Fidelia Quirot
Personal information
Full name Ana Fidelia Quirot Moré
Born (1963-03-23) 23 March 1963
Palma Soriano, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba
Height 165 cm (5 ft 5 in)[1]
Weight 59 kg (130 lb)
Updated on 10 February 2014.

Ana Fidelia Quirot Moré (Spanish pronunciation: ; born March 23, 1963) is a female former athlete from Cuba, who specialised in the 800 m but was also successful over 400 m. At 800 metres, she is a two-time World Champion (1995, 1997) and a two-time Olympic medallist (1992, 1996). Her best time of 1:54.44 from 1989, still ranks her fourth on world all-time list (as of 2014).

Career

Quirot was born in Palma Soriano, Cuba. In 1983, she won a silver medal in the 400 metres at the Pan American Games in Caracus, running 51.83. Four years later at the Pan American Games in Indianapolis, she won both the 400 m and 800 m. In the 400 m, she ran 50.27 to defeat Canada's Jillian Richardson, while in the 800 m she defeated Delisa Walton-Floyd of the USA in 1:59.06. Later that year at the 1987 World Championships in Rome, she improved her 800 m best 1:55.84, to finish fourth in a high quality final. The race was won by East Germany's Sigrun Wodars in 1:55.32.

At the 1989 IAAF World Cup in Barcelona, Quirot reached her peak at 800 metres. In a race that was fast from the start, thanks to the front running of World and Olympic champion Wodars, Quirot won in 1:54.44, to move to third on the world all-time list behind world record holder Jarmila Kratochvilova and 1980 Olympic champion Nadezhda Olizarenko. She also won the 400 m, after original winner Marie-Jose Perec was disqualified for running out of her lane. In 1990, she again achieved a 400m, 800 m double, this time at the Goodwill Games in Seattle. She won the 400 min 50.38 and the 800 m in 1:57.42, narrowly ahead of the Soviet Union's Liliya Nurutdinova, who ran 1:57.52.

Quirot was unbeaten at the 800 metres for almost three years, from her fourth place at the 1987 Worlds, to the Zurich Grand Prix in August 1990, when she was third behind the East German pair of Wodars and Christine Wachtel. She won a silver medal at the 1991 1991 World Championships in Tokyo, narrowly losing to Nurutdinova 1:57.50 to 1:57.55.

Having been prevented from competing at the 1984 and 1988 Olympic Games, due to the Cuban boycotts, Quirot made her Olympic debut at the 1992 games in Barcelona, where she won a bronze medal in the 800 m behind Ellen van Langen and Nurutdinova. However the following year she was involved in a domestic accident that left her seriously injured. She was pregnant at the time and gave birth to her daughter prematurely in hospital while fighting for her life. Her daughter did not survive and died a week after she was born.

Quirot returned from her accident in late 1993 and won a silver medal in the Central America Games, behind the Surinam athlete Letitia Vriesde. Then in 1995, at the World Championships in Gothenburg, she became World champion, defeating Vriesde and Kelly Holmes, who were second and third respectively.

Quirot won her second Olympic medal at the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, winning silver. This was a disappointing result for her as she went in as the 2nd favorite behind Maria Mutola, and defeated Mutola, but ended up losing the gold to the Russian Svetlana Masterkova, who had returned to the sport in 1996, after two years away to have a baby. In 1997, Quirot retained her World title at the 1997 World Championships in Athens, with Yelena Afanasyeva second and Mutola third.

Quirot is one of only six female athletes who have run under 1 minute and 55 seconds for 800 m. Her best time of 1:54.44 from 1989, ranks her fourth on the world all-time list behind Kratochvilova, Olizarenko and Pamela Jelimo. She also ran 1:54.82 to beat Maria Mutola in a Grand Prix race in Cologne in 1997.[2] Her lifetime best for 400 m is 49.61 in 1991. She also holds the world best for the unofficial distance of 600 metres with 1:22.63 at altitude in 1997.

References

  1. ^ "Ana Fidelia Quirot". sports-reference.com. Sports Reference LLC. Retrieved 10 February 2014. 
  2. ^ http://www.iaaf.org/statistics/toplists/inout=o/age=n/season=0/sex=W/all=y/legal=A/disc=800/detail.html

External links and sources

  • Ana Fidelia Quirot profile at IAAF
  • [1] a brief biography in French
  • [2] a blog with photo of Quirot taken on 1 st May 2007.

Awards
Preceded by
Florence Griffith-Joyner
Women's Track & Field Athlete of the Year
1989
Succeeded by
Merlene Ottey


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.