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Angela Hitler

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Title: Angela Hitler  
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Subject: Hitler family, Alois Hitler, Klara Hitler, Geli Raubal, Eva Braun
Collection: 1883 Births, 1949 Deaths, Hitler Family, People from Braunau Am Inn
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Angela Hitler

Angela Hitler
Angela Hitler
Born Angela Franziska Johanna Hitler
(1883-07-28)28 July 1883
Braunau, Austria-Hungary
Died 30 October 1949(1949-10-30) (aged 66)
Hanover, West Germany
Nationality Austro-Hungarian, Austrian
Other names Angela Raubal
Angela Hammitzsch
Spouse(s) Leo Raubal (1903-1910; his death)
Martin Hammitzsch (1936-1945; his death)
Children Leo Rudolf Raubal
Geli Raubal
Elfriede (Friedl) Raubal
Parent(s)

Alois Hitler, Sr.
Franziska Matzelsberger

Stepmother: Klara Hitler[1]
Relatives Adolf Hitler (half-brother)
Alois Hitler, Jr. (brother)
Gustav Hitler (half-brother)
Ida Hitler (half-sister)
Otto Hitler(half-brother)
Edmund Hitler (half-brother)
Paula Hitler (half-sister)

Angela Franziska Johanna Hammitzsch (née Hitler; 28 July 1883 – 30 October 1949), was the elder half-sister of Adolf Hitler. By her first husband, Leo Raubal, Sr., she was the mother of Geli Raubal.

Contents

  • Life 1
    • Widow 1.1
    • Remarriage 1.2
    • Post war 1.3
  • Family 2
  • Film portrayals 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • Sources 6

Life

Angela Hitler was born in Braunau, Austria-Hungary, the second child of Alois Hitler, Sr. and his second wife, Franziska Matzelsberger. Her mother died the following year. She and her brother Alois Hitler, Jr. were brought up by their father and his third wife Klara Pölzl. Her half-brother Adolf Hitler was born six years after her, and they grew very close. She is the only one of his siblings mentioned in Mein Kampf.

Angela's father died in 1903 and her stepmother died in 1907, leaving a small inheritance. On 14 September 1903[2][3] she married Leo Raubal (11 June 1879 - 10 August 1910), a junior tax inspector, and gave birth to a son, Leo on 12 October 1906. On 4 June 1908 Angela gave birth to Geli and in 1910 to a second daughter, Elfriede (Elfriede Maria Hochegger, 10 January 1910 - 24 September 1993). Her husband died in 1910.

Widow

She moved to Vienna after World War I. Walter Langer's wartime report The Mind of Adolf Hitler, an OSS profile of the Hitler family, paints a positive picture of Angela at this period, describing her as "rather a decent and industrious person". It says she became manager of Mensa Academia Judaica, a boarding house for Jewish students, where she once defended those in her care against anti-Semitic rioters. According to Langer, "Some of our informants knew her during this time and report that in the student riots Angela defended the Jewish students from attack and on several occasions beat the Aryan students off the steps of the dining hall with a club. She is a rather large, strong peasant type of person who is well able to take an active part."[4]

Angela had heard nothing from Adolf for a decade when he re-established contact with her in 1919. In 1924 Adolf was confined in Landsberg, Angela made the trip from Vienna to visit him. In 1928 she and Geli moved to the Berghof at Obersalzberg near Berchtesgaden where she became his housekeeper and was later put in charge of the household at Hitler's expanded retreat. Geli committed suicide in 1931.

Angela continued to work for her brother after Geli's death, but she strongly disapproved of Hitler's relationship with Eva Braun.[5] She eventually left Berchtesgaden as a result and moved to Dresden.

Remarriage

On 20 January 1936 she married architect Professor Martin Hammitzsch (22 May 1878- 12 May 1945), who designed the famous Yenidze cigarette factory in Dresden, and who later became the Director of the State School of Building Construction in Dresden.

On June 26, 1936, the couple returned to Passau. When they visited the house at the Inn river, where Angela had lived as a child, they left an entry at the visitors' book, and the local newspaper reported.[6]

Hitler apparently disapproved of the marriage, and referred to his sister as "Frau Hammitzsch".[5] It seems, however, that Hitler re-established contact with her during World War II, because Angela remained his intermediary to the rest of the family with whom he did not want contact. In 1941, she sold her memoirs of her years with Hitler to the Eher Verlag, which brought her 20,000 Reichsmark.

In spring 1945 — after the destruction of Dresden in the massive bomb attack of February 13/14 — Adolf Hitler moved Angela to Berchtesgaden to avoid her being captured by the Soviets. Also he lent her and her younger sister Paula over 100,000 Reichsmark. In Hitler's Last Will and Testament, he guaranteed Angela a pension of 1,000 Reichsmark monthly. It is uncertain if she ever received any payments. Her second husband committed suicide shortly after the final defeat of Germany.[7] In 1949, Angela Hitler-Hammitzsch died after a stroke.[8]

Post war

Hitler apparently had a low opinion of both his sisters' intelligence, calling them "stupid geese".[5] Nevertheless, she spoke very highly of him even after the war, and claimed that neither her brother nor she herself had known anything about the Holocaust. Angela Hitler died of a stroke on the 30th of October, 1949 in the city of Hanover, Germany.[7]

Family

Her son Leo had a son - Peter (b. 1931), a retired engineer who lives in Linz, Austria. Angela's daughter Elfriede married German lawyer Dr. Ernst Hochegger on 27 June 1937 in Düsseldorf;[9][10][11] they had a son, Heiner Hochegger (born in January 1945).[12]

Film portrayals

She is played by Helene Thimig in the 1943 movie The Hitler Gang. In the 2003 miniseries Hitler: The Rise of Evil, she is portrayed by Julie-Ann Hassett.

In the French 1982 comedy L'as des as, Angela Hitler is portrayed as the caretaker of Hitler's Obersalzberg residence. She is played in drag by Günter Meisner, the same actor who plays Hitler.

See also

References

  1. ^ "The Mind of Adolf Hitler",Walter C. Langer, New York 1972 p.116
  2. ^  
  3. ^  
  4. ^ Walter C. Langer, The Mind of Adolf Hitler:The Secret Wartime Report, Basic Books, New York, 1972, p.121.
  5. ^ a b c Fritz Redlich, Hitler:Diagnosis of a Destructive Prophet, Oxford University Press, New York, 1999,p.10
  6. ^ Anna Rosmus Hitlers Nibelungen, Samples Grafenau 2015, pp. 122ff
  7. ^ a b Mitchell, Arthur, Hitler's Mountain: The Führer, Obersalzberg and the American Occupation of Berchtesgaden, McFarland, 2007 p.154.
  8. ^ Anna Rosmus Hitlers Nibelungen, Samples Grafenau 2015, pp. 124
  9. ^ Schaub, Julius; Olaf Rose (2005). Julius Schaub, in Hitlers Schatten: Erinnerungen und Aufzeichnungen des Chefadjutanten 1925-1945. Druffel & Vowinckel-Verlag. p. 421.  
  10. ^  
  11. ^ Läpple, Alfred (2003). Paula Hitler: die unbekannte Schwester Zeitgeschichte (Druffel Verlag). Druffel. p. 174. 
  12. ^  

Sources

  • (Dutch) "De jeugd van Adolf Hitler 1889-1907 en zijn familie en voorouders" by Marc Vermeeren. Soesterberg, 2007, 420 blz. Uitgeverij Aspekt, ISBN 90-5911-606-2
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