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Anterior temporal lobectomy

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Title: Anterior temporal lobectomy  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Subject: Neurosurgery, Ventriculostomy, Hypophysectomy, Discectomy, Epilepsy
Collection: Epilepsy, Neurosurgery, Surgical Removal Procedures
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Anterior temporal lobectomy

Anterior temporal lobectomy
Intervention
ICD-9-CM 01.53
MeSH

Anterior temporal lobectomy is the complete removal of the anterior portion of the temporal lobe of the brain. It is a treatment option in temporal lobe epilepsy for those in whom anticonvulsant medications do not control epileptic seizures.

The techniques for removing temporal lobe tissue vary from resection of large amounts of tissue, including lateral temporal cortex along with medial structures, to more restricted anterior temporal lobectomy (ATL) to more restricted removal of only the medial structures (selective amygdalohippocampectomy, SAH).

Nearly all reports of seizure outcome following these procedures indicate that the best outcome group includes patients with MRI evidence of mesial temporal sclerosis (hippocampal atrophy with increased T-2 signal.) The range of seizure-free outcomes for these patients is reported to be between 80 and 90%, which is typically reported as a sub-set of data within a larger surgical series.[1][2]

Open surgical procedures such as ATL have inherent risks including damage to the brain (either directly or indirectly by injury to important blood vessels), bleeding (which can require re-operation), blood loss (which can require transfusion), and infection. Furthermore, open procedures require several days of care in the hospital including at least one night in an intensive care unit. Although such treatment can be costly, multiple studies have demonstrated that ATL in patients who have failed at least two anticonvulsant drug trials (thereby meeting the criteria for medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy) has lower mortality, lower morbidity and lower long-term cost in comparison with continued medical therapy without surgical intervention.

The strongest evidence supporting ATL over continued medical therapy for medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy is a prospective, randomized trial of ATL compared to best medical therapy (anticonvulsants), which convincingly demonstrated that the seizure-free rate after surgery was ~ 60% as compared to only 8% for the medicine only group.[3] Furthermore, there was no mortality in the surgery group, while there was seizure-related mortality in the medical therapy group. Therefore, ATL is considered the standard of care for patients with medically intractable mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

References

  1. ^ Engel J (1996). "Surgery for seizures". New England Journal of Medicine 334: 647–652.  
  2. ^ Spencer SS, Berg AT, Vickrey BG, Sperling MR, Bazil CW, Shinnar S; et al. (2003). "Predicting long-term seizure outcome after resective epilepsy surgery: the multicenter study". Neurology 65 (6): 1680–1685.  
  3. ^ Wiebe S, Blume WT, Girvin JP, Eliasziw M. A. (2001). "A randomized, controlled trial of surgery for temporal-lobe epilepsy". New England J Medicine 345 (5): 311–318.  

External links

  • Surgery Encyclopedia: Anterior temporal lobectomy
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