World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Anti-rival good

Article Id: WHEBN0007923922
Reproduction Date:

Title: Anti-rival good  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Rivalry (economics), Goods, Types of goods, Independent goods, Necessity good
Collection: Goods
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Anti-rival good

An anti-rival good is a neologism suggested by Steven Weber. According to his definition, it is the opposite of a rival good. When more people share an anti-rival good, the more utility each person receives. Examples include software and other information goods created through the process of commons-based peer production.

An anti-rival good meets the test of a public good because it is non-excludable (freely available to all) and non-rival (consumption by one person does not reduce the amount available for others).[1] However, it has the additional quality of being created by private individuals for common benefit without being motivated by pure altruism, because the individual contributor also receives benefits from the contributions of others.

An example is provided by Lawrence Lessig, "It's not just that code is non-rival; it's that code in particular, and (at least some) knowledge in general, is, as Weber calls it, 'anti-rival'. I am not only not harmed when you share an anti-rival good: I benefit." [2]

The production of anti-rival goods typically benefits from network effects. Leung (2006)[3] quotes from Weber (2004), "Under conditions of anti-rivalness, as the size of the Internet-connected group increases, and there is a heterogeneous distribution of motivations with people who have a high level of interest and some resources to invest, then the large group is more likely, all things being equal, to provide the good than is a small group." [4]

Although this term is a neologism, this category of goods may be neither new nor specific to the Internet era. According to Lessig, English also meets the criteria, as any natural language is an anti-rival good.[5] The term also invokes reciprocity and the concept of a gift economy.

References

  1. ^  
  2. ^ Lessig, L. "Do You Floss?". London Review of Books. Archived from the original on 10 December 2006. Retrieved November 14, 2006. 
  3. ^ Leung, T. "(Review) The Success of Open Source". Sauria Associates. Retrieved November 15, 2006. 
  4. ^ Weber, S. (2004), The Success of Open Source, Harvard University Press,  
  5. ^ Lessig, L. "Do You Floss?". London Review of Books. Archived from the original on 10 December 2006. Retrieved November 14, 2006. 
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.