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Arabic language in the United States

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Title: Arabic language in the United States  
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Subject: American English, Alaska, Languages of the United States, North Olmsted, Ohio, List of African-American inventors and scientists
Collection: Arab-American Culture, Arabic Language, Languages of the United States
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Arabic language in the United States

A bilingual (English, Arabic) sign at the Detroit People Mover Grand Circus Park station
Arabic speakers in the US
Year
Speakers
1910
32,868
1920
57,557
1930
67,830
1940
50,940
1960
49,908
1970
73,657
1980
251,409
1990[1]
355,150
2000[2]
614,582
2010[3]
864,961
^a Foreign-born population only[4][5]
Arabic speakers in the United States by states in 2010[6]
State Arabic speakers
California
158,398
Michigan
101,470
New York
86,269
Texas
54,340
Illinois
53,251
New Jersey
51,011
Virginia
36,683
Florida
34,698
Ohio
33,125

Arabic is the fastest-growing foreign language taught at U.S. colleges and universities, a trend mirrored at the University of Iowa.

Arabic in 2006 became the 10th most-studied language in the United States.[7]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Detailed Language Spoken at Home and Ability to Speak English for Persons 5 Years and Over --50 Languages with Greatest Number of Speakers: United States 1990".  
  2. ^ "Language Spoken at Home: 2000".  
  3. ^ http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_10_1YR_B16001&prodType=table
  4. ^ "Mother Tongue of the Foreign-Born Population: 1910 to 1940, 1960, and 1970".  
  5. ^ "Language Spoken at Home for the Foreign-Born Population 5 Years and Over: 1980 and 1990".  
  6. ^ http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/tableservices/jsf/pages/productview.xhtml?pid=ACS_10_1YR_B16001&prodType=table
  7. ^ Heldt, Diane (25 March 2010). "Arabic is fastest-growing language at U.S. colleges".  
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