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Arcade system board

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Title: Arcade system board  
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Subject: List of Sega arcade system boards, Kinnikuman Muscle Grand Prix, F-Zero GX, Art of Fighting, Arcana Heart
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Arcade system board

An arcade system board is a dedicated computer system created for the purpose of running video arcade games. Arcade system boards typically consist of a main system board with any number of supporting boards.[1]

Contents

  • Design 1
  • List of arcade system boards 2
    • Atari 2.1
    • Bally 2.2
    • BrezzaSoft 2.3
    • Capcom 2.4
    • Cave 2.5
    • CD Express 2.6
    • Data East 2.7
    • Eolith 2.8
    • Examu 2.9
    • Fuuki 2.10
    • Gaelco 2.11
    • ICE 2.12
    • International Games System 2.13
    • Incredible Technologies 2.14
    • Interpark 2.15
    • Irem 2.16
    • Jaleco 2.17
    • Kaneko 2.18
    • Konami 2.19
    • Limenko 2.20
    • Metro 2.21
    • MicroProse 2.22
    • Midway 2.23
    • Mitchell 2.24
    • Namco 2.25
    • Nintendo 2.26
    • Psikyo 2.27
    • RCI 2.28
    • Sammy 2.29
    • Sega 2.30
    • Seibu 2.31
    • SI Electronics 2.32
    • Seta 2.33
    • Skonec 2.34
    • SNK 2.35
    • Sony 2.36
    • Taito 2.37
    • Tecmo 2.38
    • Terminal 2.39
    • Williams 2.40
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Design

The earliest non-microprocessor based arcade system boards were designed around codeless state machine computers with the main board and any support boards consisting of discrete logic circuits comprising each element of the game itself.[2] The next generation of arcade system boards, with the inclusion of microprocessor based technology, incorporated the game program code directly on the main system board via game code stored in ROM chips mounted on the main board.

Later arcade system boards, including the DECO Cassette System, SNK's Neo-Geo, Capcom's CPS-2, and Sega's NAOMI, separated the system board from the game program itself, akin to a home video game console and cartridge/CD/DVD/Hard Disk. This method benefitted both manufacturers and arcade game owners. Once the system board was purchased, the owner could switch out the games at a fraction of the price and with less effort, and the manufacturers could produce fewer of the costly system boards and more of the less-costly games.

Currently, the company with the record of the highest number of original arcade system boards is Sega.

List of arcade system boards

Atari

Bally

BrezzaSoft

Capcom

Cave

CD Express

Data East

Eolith

Examu

Fuuki

Gaelco

ICE

International Games System

Incredible Technologies

Interpark

Irem

Jaleco

Kaneko

Konami

Limenko

Metro

MicroProse

Midway

Mitchell

Namco

  • Namco System 147 (2011)
  • Namco System ES2 Plus (2012)
  • Namco System ES3 (2013–)
  • Namco Unreal Engine 4 (2015)

Nintendo

Psikyo

RCI

Sammy

Sega

Seibu

SI Electronics

Seta

Skonec

SNK

Sony

Taito

Tecmo

Terminal

Williams

See also

References

  1. ^ http://www.computerspacefan.com/ComputerSpace.pdf
  2. ^ Al Alcorn Interview
This video game–related list is ; you can help by .
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